Self-Discovery

Self-Discovery Tools

The thing to understand about analytical tools—usually referred to as “inventories”—used in the self-assessment process is that they don’t spit out answers. No evaluation or set of questions can tell you what you should be, or even necessarily what you’d be good at doing. That said, inventories can be particularly useful in helping you sort out a direction, identifying your skills, interests, and values, as well as your motivations.

Our career counselors offer the following assessments and will carefully go over the results with you. To discuss self-assessments further, please schedule an appointment to meet with a career counselor. Undergraduate and graduate students can schedule an appointment on BU CareerLink. Alumni, please call 617-353-3590 to set up an appointment.

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a questionnaire designed to measure psychological preferences in how people perceive the world and make decisions. You’ll answer questions related to how you deal with the world, how you gather information, how you make decisions, and what your orientation is to others. At the end, you’ll be given an indicator that describes your personality type and a list of possible career options. There is a $10 fee to take the MBTI.

Strong Interest Inventory

Strong Interest Inventory seeks to offer insight into a person’s interests that will help inform a career choice. The inventory takes about 30 minutes to complete. After it’s scored, you’ll be provided with a summary of how your interests apply in five areas: vocational (work-related), avocational (activities outside work), types of work environments that best suit you, type of people you are most likely to work well with, and types of work tasks you are most likely to enjoy. It also measures how your interests might be similar to those of others. There is a $10 fee to take the Strong Interest Inventory.

Career Decision-Making System

The Career Decision-Making System (CDM) helps you map a career path and explore career options. It’s self-scored and strives to identify your occupational interests, values, and abilities, and then match those interests to career options.

SkillScan

SkillScan is an assessment that will help you identify your natural strengths and key transferable skills, as well as areas for improvement and development, for use in your future career. When taking this assessment, you choose specific skills that you feel are your strengths. You’ll gain knowledge of your skills and preferences that will help when on the job.

Values Card Sort

The Values Card Sort provides a quick and easy way to clarify what you want in a career. You’ll be given a deck of cards and will deal them out into several categories. It allows you to prioritize your values, such as free time, precision work, power, technical competence, and public contact.

Skills Card Sort

The Skills Card Sort is a quick and easy way to identify the skills you have that are central to your career satisfaction and success. Your selections will involve assessing your proficiency in various skills, then your motivation to use these skills.