David Langer, Ph.D.

Title
Clinical Director, Child Programs
Co-Director of Research, Child Programs
Office
648 Beacon Street
Email
dalanger@bu.edu

David Langer, Ph.D., is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Boston University. He serves as the Clinical Director and Co-Director of Research of the Child Program at the BU Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders and Associate Director of the Family Development and Treatment Laboratory. Dr. Langer’s research explores the efficacy and effectiveness of psychosocial treatments for youth psychopathology, the processes through which psychosocial treatments work, and the applicability of the research literature to non-research clinical settings. He is currently working on developing novel approaches to personalize psychosocial treatments for youth by supporting active collaboration between clinicians and families throughout the treatment planning process (i.e., shared decision-making). Dr. Langer’s research has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and his work has been published in prestigious peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international research conferences. Dr. Langer’s research involves graduate and undergraduate students at all levels, and Dr. Langer mentors graduate and undergraduate students in the development and execution of their own research studies, as well as providing clinical training and supervision.

Dr. Langer graduated summa cum laude from Washington University in St. Louis in 2003, with a B.A. in Psychology and Philosophy. He received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2009. He completed his pre-doctoral internship in child psychology at the UCLA Semel Institute and Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital, and his post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard University. Dr. Langer has received specialized training in the treatment of childhood anxiety and depression, co-morbid anxiety and autism spectrum disorders, social skills training, family therapy, and disruptive behavior disorders.