Law of the National Banking and Securities Commission of 1995

Mexico

(amended through 2009)

The Law of the National Banking and Securities Commission of 1995 (Ley de la Comisión Nacional Bancaria y de Valores) (CNBV) establishes the CNBV, Mexico’s main regulator of financial institutions. The CNBV is an independent, decentralized sub-agency of the Ministry of Finance whose mission is to safeguard the stability of the Mexican financial system and to promote its efficiency and inclusive development for the benefit of society. This law has been amended several times to be in line with microfinance reforms introduced in the Popular Savings and Credit Law of 2001 and the Law Regulating the Activities of Cooperative Savings and Credit Societies of 2009. The latest amendments seek to clarify the powers of the CNBV to monitor Popular Savings and Credit Societies (SCAPs) as nonprofit companies integrated into the Mexican financial system.

The law is organized as follows:

  • Title I Nature, Object, and Powers:
    • Includes provisions on the CNBV’s role in issuing prudential regulations (Art. 6) and conducting inspections and interventions (Arts. 7-9);
  • Title II Organization and Governance; and
  • Title III General Provisions.