Biology Faculty in the News

Research

Oct 21, 2014

BU's new Research Website

Boston University has launched a new website, called simply Research to showcase the depth and breadth of research at the University. The site will publish articles, profiles, and videos aimed at policy makers, other universities, potential students and faculty, federal agencies, funders, and mainstream media. It will also provide resources and support for researchers. “The BU Research website is a much-needed central hub and will enhance our awareness of research, promote collaboration, and act as a catalyst for new research ideas.”

Read more from BU Today's Article, "BU Launces Research Website."

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Definining Women at Women's Colleges

Oct 21, 2014

Prof. Karen Warkentin Mentioned in BU Today

Prof. Karen Warkentin was mentioned in BU Today's article, "POV:Expanding the Definition of Women at Women's Colleges." Prof. Warkentin teaches CAS WS 101 Gender and Sexuality. Her students took a poll on one of the first days of class and indicated that most students believe the letter on a birth certificate does not define what it means to be a “woman,” a “man,” or another gendered category. The course goes on to consider the ways biological sex categories are also far more complicated than the F/M designation at birth.

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Heating Cables to Study Climate Change

Oct 07, 2014

Prof. Pam Templer and her students buried two-plus miles of heating cables in the New Hampshire woods to study climate change. Read more from BU Today's article, "Wiring the Woods."

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Prof. Tim Gardner Invited to White House

Oct 03, 2014

Receives NIH Grant

Biology's own, Prof. Timothy Gardner, was invited to the White House for a conference announcing stepped-up efforts to advance the president's ambitious BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Neurotechnologies) Initiative. The NIH awarded Prof. Tim Gardner, along with others, a federal grant Tuesday (10/6) as part of the BRAIN Initiative. Gardner's grant is part of the NIH's $46 million investment in grants for the BRAIN Initiative.

Read more on BU Today's Article, BU Brain Researchers among Those Invited to White House.

Read more from the Daily Free Press, "BU professor receives grant for brain research."

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Innovation Career Development Professorship

Oct 01, 2014

Awarded to Prof. Timothy Gardner

From CAS News: "Tim Gardner, Assistant Professor of Biology, has been chosen for the 2014–15 Innovation Career Development Professorship. The Innovation Career Development Professorship is a prestigious award that provides a three-year, nonrenewable stipend designed to support scholarly or creative work. Gardner will work on two main projects. First, he will study the sensory-motor learning in songbirds to better understand the cell-type-specific rules underlying vocal learning. Second, he will seek to engineer new electrode arrays for peripheral nerve stimulation, which he anticipates will be useful for treating medical conditions such as asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, and infertility, among others."

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Petitioners seeking BU's divestment from fossil fuel companies

Sep 10, 2014

Prof. Ed Loechler involved in this Petition

Professor Edward Loechler was featured in BU Today's article, "BU Faculty Petition Urges Diverstment from fossil fuel companies." He was one of the faculty members to present this petition to President Robert Brown.

"In an effort to combat climate change, 245 BU faculty members have signed a petition asking the University to divest oil, gas, and coal companies from its endowment.

The petition was presented by four faculty members and one student yesterday to President Robert A. Brown, who said he would forward it to the trustees when they meet in two weeks and to the University’s Advisory Committee on Socially Responsible Investing, which was created last year."

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Paul Lipton, New UROP Director

Jun 13, 2014

Paul Lipton, a College of Arts & Sciences professor of neuroscience and director of the undergraduate neuroscience program, has been named the new director of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP), which provides funding for faculty-mentored research by undergrad students in the humanities, natural sciences, medicine, arts, and education. Effective in August, Lipton succeeds Thomas Gilmore, a CAS professor of biology and a School of Medicine adjunct professor of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, who has led UROP for the past seven years.

BU TODAY: Paul Lipton Named New UROP Director

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Kaufman teams up with Conservation International

Jun 10, 2014

In the New York Times Science section

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Prof. Fulweiler on Nitrogen Footprints

Jun 07, 2014

WGBH Forum Network

Taped by WGBH Forum Network, biologist Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler visited the New England Aquarium to discuss the immortal life of nitrogen.

Read more on WGBH News.

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Prof. Baum Receives Achievement Award

Jun 03, 2014

The 2014 Daniel S. Lehrman Lifetime Achievement Award

SBN is pleased to award the Daniel S. Lehrman Lifetime AchievementAward in Behavioral Neuroendocrinology to Michael J. Baum, Professor of Biology at Boston University. Dr. Baum received a PhD in Psychology from McGill University and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Erasmus, The Netherlands. He was on the faculty in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science at MIT, and then joined the faculty at Boston University in 1985.

Dr. Baum has made many seminal contributions to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying sex differences in the brain and behavior. His work on the organization of sexually dimorphic neural circuits by gonadal hormones has been particularly transformative in generating new conceptual frameworks that have stood the test of time. His influence on the field reverberates through the numerous successful behavioral neuroendocrinologists that he has trained and mentored. Many of these scientists wrote compelling testimonials to the inspiration, encouragement and wisdom that Dr. Baum provided and continues to provide them. During his almost ten-year service as Editor-in-Chief of Hormones and Behavior, Dr. Baum single-handedly brought back the journal's reputation for scientific rigor and publishing high-quality, high-impact papers. Dr. Baum has been an active member of SBN since its inception, and served as the third President of SBN from 2001 to 2003.

We are delighted to recognize and honor Dr. Baum for his leadership, passion and long-lasting scientific contributions to the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology. The award will be officially presented at the 2014 SBN Annual Meeting in Sydney. Our heartfelt congratulations to one of the best our community has to offer!

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Prof. Primack Voted Excellent Foreign Expert

Jun 03, 2014

Headed to China this summer

Professor Richard Primack has been voted as an excellent foreign expert by the State Bureau of Foreign Experts Affairs. He will be spending this July and August (2014) in Harbin, China for teaching and research collaboration.

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PharmLogic Inc Funds Hansen/Schaus Collaboration

May 12, 2014

The Hansen lab has made further progress in their research to fight liver cancer. A major focus of research has centered around one protein, LSF, which can control several distinct points in the progression of dividing cells through their cycle. Drs. Hansen and Schaus combined forces to characterize and optimize these molecules, showing that they killed liver cancer cells – this resulted in two patent applications on different LSF inhibitors. The LSF inhibitors also dramatically reduce liver cancer growth, in mouse model studies, remarkably without any observable toxicity.  Based on these findings, PharmLogic, Inc. is currently funding the Hansen and Schaus collaboration to generate sufficient data such that the FDA will approve clinical trials using the best current inhibitor.

Read more about the Hansen/Schaus collaboration from BU Today's article, "Taking on Cancer: Tackling LIver Cancer in the Lab."

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Warkentin Lab highlighted in Science

May 01, 2014

When Dads Go Missing, Frogs Start Hatching

Dr. Karen Warkentin and graduate student Jesse Delia's research on early hatching behavior of glass frogs in Central and South America is highlighted in Science magazine.

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New study by Prof. Templer on Harmful Winters

Apr 25, 2014

Professor Pamela Templer conducted a new study showing that milder winters can negatively effect trees and water quality of nearby aquatic ecosystems. She is following up her recent winter research with a new NSF funded project using warming cables in the ground to determine the combined effects of warmer winters and summer on the trees.

Read more on CAS News "CAS Study: Milder Winters Will Harm Ecosystems."

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Finzi and alum team up on Climate Change

Apr 22, 2014

Colin Averill (CAS '08), mentored in Dr. Adrien Finzi's lab is now earning a PhD through UT Austin’s Ecology Evolution and Behavior program. Averill is conducting research that could revolutionize our understanding of climate change, and maybe even help us fight it. CAS News..

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Prof. Jennifer Talbot published in PNAS

Apr 18, 2014

Prof. Jennifer Talbot's manuscript "Endemism and functional convergence across the North American soil mycobiome" was published in PNAS on April 17th. This study is about the distribution & function of soil microorganisms across N. America.

The Stanford News has made a press release, also published April 17th.

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Schneider & Warkentin lead herpetology trip to FL

Apr 15, 2014

BU Today

Prof. Chris Schneider and Prof. Karen Warkentin led a group of herpetology students to Florida for their spring break. For more information, pictures, and video, see BU Today's article, "Teachable Moments in Gator Country."

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Prof. Atema featured in Latin Post

Apr 03, 2014

Study Shows Sharks Combine All Their Senses to Hunt

"A first-of-its-kind study of how sharks hunt has found the long-feared fish are truly complete predators, using all of their senses in an array of different combinations and ways.

Led by scientists from Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, Fla., the University of South Florida in Tampa and Boston University, the research sought to better understand how a shark's vision, touch, smell and other senses seem to combine and guide a detailed series of behaviors from start to finish."

Read full article from Latin Post

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Prof. Atema featured in Herald-Tribune

Apr 02, 2014

Mote study sheds light on how sharks feed

“So much of this work had to be conducted on the front end, trying to figure things out,” Gardiner says. “This was no small undertaking. Fortunately we had a great team.” The team included Mote senior scientist Bob Hueter, Boston University biologist Jelle Atema, and USF's Philip Motta.

Read full article from the Herald Tribune (Sarasota, FL)

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Commemorating Prof. Emeritus Hartman

Mar 27, 2014

Dr. Stan Hartman (1931-2014)

Professor Emeritus Stan Hartman of Chemistry has sadly passed away last week. While many of you remember Stan for his leadership roles in the Department of Chemistry, Stan also was one of the founders and the first director of the BMB program and the associated MA in Biotechnology program. Stan also taught a "Recombinant DNA" project lab course, parts of which live on today in the Molecular Biology Laboratory (BB 522) and Genetics Laboratory (BI 513) courses. Chemistry has set up a commemoration page to Stan that includes a link to a candid interview he gave upon his retirement – definitely a recommended read!

Information on a memorial service to be held on Wednesday April 2.

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2014 United Methodist Scholar/Teacher of the Year Award

Mar 25, 2014

Dr. Thomas Gilmore

Gilmore’s dedication to research and instruction has earned him the 2014 United Methodist Scholar/Teacher of the Year Award. Endowed by the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry of the United Methodist Church, the award recognizes outstanding scholarship and contributions to the learning arts and the University.

Read more from BU Today's article, "CAS Biologist Gilmore is United Methodist Scholar/Teacher of the Year."

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Finzi explores climate change and fungus

Mar 12, 2014

Adrien Finzi talks carbon dioxide and global warming and how a common fungus is helping protect the Earth from climate change in StateImpact and Nature World News.

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Atema featured in The Scientist

Mar 01, 2014

Fact is more interesting than fiction

Jelle Atema's  laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution works on  pinning down shark behavioral olfaction threshold: the concentration of odor in the water that initiates a tracking behavior in sharks.


Read more

 

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Oldest Fruit Tree in U.S. Still Bears Pears After Nearly 400 Years

Feb 25, 2014

Professor Richard Primack Quoted in Huffington Post

In a recent Huffington Post article written by Jacqueline Howard, a celebrated Endicott Pear Tree in Danvers, Massachusetts is recognized for its ripe old age of about 383 years – and still bear fruit. Dr. Richard Primack comments on the rarity of such a fruit tree to last over the usual 100 years and notes the tree’s relatively open conditions. He says that old trees tend to be members of the Conifer family and usually aren’t fruit-bearing.

See the full article at:

www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/28/oldest-fruit-tree-us-pears_n_3830443.html

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Professor Finzi's Research Featured in Nature World News Article

Feb 25, 2014

Tiny fungi that play a role in the storage and release of carbon from plants have been overlooked in myriad studies of carbon and its effect on the environment, according to new research which suggest the tiny organism plays a big part in the global carbon cycle. 

Read More at..

www.natureworldnews.com/articles/5592/20140109/tiny-fungi-play-big-role-levels-carbon-environment.htm

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Jelle Atema featured on BU Today

Feb 25, 2014

What a Shark Nose Knows

CAS professor biology and adjunct scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Jelle Atema works with graduate student, Ashley Jennings, to decipher how sharks smell by experimenting on locally caught sharks that live happily in lab pools. Atema and another graduate student, Jayne Gardiner, discovered that sharks turn in the direction of the nostril that first detects a prey’s odor and can therefore smell their prey within seconds no matter how chaotically dispersed the odor plume is.

Read the full article at: http://www.bu.edu/today/2013/sharks-sense-of-smell/

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Professor Richard Primack "Climate change research in partnership with Thoreau"

Feb 25, 2014

In his blog, “Climate change research in partnership with Thoreau", Primack studies the effects of climate change on the timing of seasonal biological events and species diversity with the help of Henry David Thoreau and other local naturalists. The highlight of his most recent trip to “Thailand and Laos with a dash of Thoreau” was his visit to the Khao Yai National Park where he found the extremely abundant wildlife including pheasants, gibbons, sambar deer, hornbills, and procupines. Primack also measured the temperature of the bottom of the Walden Pond and worked with graduate student, Amanda Gallinat on autumn phenology in the Boston area. A separate blog entry posted by Caitlin McDonough MacKenzie focused on the common gardens in the Maine woods.

Read the full blog at: primacklab.blogspot.com

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The Game Maker

Jan 14, 2014

CAS Metcalf winner uses games to help lessons stick

CAS Metcalf winner, Professor John Finnerty, uses games to help lessons stick. Read more about Professor Finnerty and his approach to teaching at BU Today.

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Dr. Les Kaufman Featured in BU Arts and Sciences

Jan 01, 2014

Les Kaufman’s work in Cambodia is highlighted in a piece titled “Ecosystems and Us” by Chris Berdik. It discusses the imminent dangers facing ecosystems today and what we can do to help. Traditional environmental protection aims are explained, as well as proposed new ideas for conservation. A topic detailed in the article is Kaufman’s modeling work, MIMES (Multi-scale Integrated Models of Ecosystem Services).

Read more about: Professor Kaufman

 

 

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Prof. Karen Warkentin Published in Oecologia

Nov 29, 2013

Prof. Warkentin is co-author of the article “Behavioral plasticity mitigates risk across environments and predators during anuran metamorphosis,” which appears in the November issue of Oecologica. Warkentin and colleagues conducted a study examining predator-prey interactions of red-eyed tree frogs and various (aquatic or semi-terrestrial) predators across metamorphosis. They used these interactions to quantify “how frog behavior changes across metamorphic development, habitats, and predator presence or absence.”

Read more>>

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Parental care and embryo self-defense in a glassfrog

Oct 31, 2013

National Geographic

Professor Karen Warkentin’s research has led to the discovery of predator-induced early hatching in many frogs. Glassfrogs are the latest addition to the Warkentin Lab’s study organisms, and the focus of Jesse Delia’s PhD research on the evolution of parental care and hatching plasticity. Prof. Warkentin served as an advisor for this National Geographic project and her former student Myra Hughey (PhD 2011) assisted the film crew in Costa Rica.

 

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Assistant Professor Sean Mullen Featured

Oct 04, 2013

CAS Newsletter Explores Research of the Mullen Lab

BU Assistant Professor of Biology Sean Mullen is leading a team of researchers into the mountains and lowlands of Ecuador, the forests of Costa Rica, and the eastern and western United States. As principal investigator, Mullen, along with his collegues, will look at butterfly species within the Adelpha genus, comparing their rates of genetic variations and the nature of their environmental interactions in both temperate and tropical regions. Their results could help explain why a broad range of species adapts more quickly in the tropics. Read the full Newsletter. Additional  researchers include: Dr. Marcus Kronforst (University of Chicago), Dr. Adriana Briscoe (UC Irvine), Dr. Ryan Hill (University of the Pacific), Dr. Keith Willmott (Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida)

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Professor Art Jahnke in BU Today

Oct 01, 2013

In a BU Today article, Dr. Art Jahnke writes about the BU National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL) moving one step closer to full operation. A federal court judge ruled that research involved pathogens at BioSafety Level 3 and 4 can be done safely at the BU Medical Campus site. Construction of the facility was finished in September 2008, but has been closed due to controversy and litigation. In March, BU researchers moved into the NEIDL to work on tuberculosis research that has been approved for BioSafety Level 2 laboratories.More

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Templer's Research Featured in Scientific American

Jul 01, 2013

Dr. Pamela Templer's work appears in the July 2013 issue

Professor Templer’s work on the effects of climate change appears in the July 2013 issue of Scientific American. In an article entitled “Wired Forest May Reveal How New England Forests Respond to Climate Change” by Stephanie Paige Ogburn and Climatewire, Templer discusses how she is working to simulate rising temperatures by wiring the soil of a New Hampshire forest. This project will hopefully shed more light on the consequences of climate warming on local trees and how climate change will affect New England. Read the full article

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Prof. Templer Explores Dangers of Climate Change

Jun 18, 2013

What New England May Face

In the article “Losing Winter: Climate Change Will Hit New England Hard” by Jim Motavalli on cartalk.com, Professor Pam Templer explains the dangers of rising global temperatures and the adverse effects this could have, especially in New England. The article looks at her work in the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire and what it can tell us about what climate change will do to the environment if the atmosphere continues to heat up. She also addresses the issues that Boston and other cities in the area will face.Read more

 

 

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CAS Researchers in BU Arts & Sciences blog

Jun 03, 2013

A BU Arts & Sciences blog recently highlighted a new study being done by CAS researchers that clarified the role of Wolbachia bacteria in pandemic diseases, available online. Their findings on horizontal transmission provide an explanation on how these bacteria thrive in “stem cell niches.” Read the full blog story

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Dr. Les Kaufman's Cambodia Expedition

May 17, 2013

Cambodia and the Tonle Sap Region

On his trip, he continues his studying of the interactions between one of the world’s largest freshwater fisheries and the people who depend on it. He visits many places including the Siem Reap River and Phnom Penh while meeting up with other colleagues and encountering all sorts of creatures. All in all, Kaufman sees hope in finding the most beneficial, sustainable choices for the people today as well as the vibrant ecosystem whose fate rests in the hands of all future Cambodians. Read more about Dr. Kaufman's research

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Professor Kaufman featured in BU Arts and Sciences Article

May 01, 2013

Prof. Les Kaufman’s work in Cambodia is highlighted in a piece titled “Ecosystems and Us” by Chris Berdik. It discusses the imminent dangers facing ecosystems today and what we can do to help. Traditional environmental protection aims are explained, as well as proposed new ideas for conservation. A topic detailed in the article is Kaufman’s modeling work, MIMES (Multi-scale Integrated Models of Ecosystem Services).

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Dr. Frydman featured in BU's Research publication

Apr 29, 2013

Dr. Horácio Frydman was featured in BU's most recent edition (2012) of Research - a publication that highlights current cutting edge research being performed on campus. In the article, "An Unlikely Ally by Kevin Jiang, Dr. Frydman's study of the Wolbachia bacteria is explained. This research will help scientists understand new strategies for preventing the spread of diseases like malaria, West Nile, and dengue fever.

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Caroline Polgar (GRS '12) mentioned in Boston Globe

Apr 12, 2013

Recent Ph.D. recipient, Dr. Caroline Polgar (GRS '12) was recently interviewed, along with her past advisor, Dr. Richard Primack, for an article on Henry Thoreau and climate change in the March 10, 2013 edition of the Boston Globe. Drs. Polgar and Primack's research on early bloom times highlighted in the article, "Thoreau, viewed as a scientist" by Kathleen Burge. The article also discusses the opening of a new exhibition at the Concord Museum exhibit, ?Early Spring: Henry Thoreau and Climate Change,? which examines Thoreau as scientist.

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Prof. Naya's Research Highlighted in Development

Apr 09, 2013

Prof. Naya's research was recently highlighted in the January 2013 issue of Development. His research on the role transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) plays in skeletal muscle regeneration of adult mice is reviewed.

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Prof. Ulla Hansen wins Ignition Award

Mar 26, 2013

Prof. Ulla Hansen, along with chemistry professor and co-inventor, Scott Schaus, have received an Ignition Award to develop a small molecule chemotherapeutic for the effective treatment of primary liver cancer. Boston University?s competitive Ignition Award Program funds faculty to advance their research toward commercialization (e.g., licensing, startup companies). Liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is the fifth most common cancer worldwide (approximately 1 million new cases each year) and the third largest cause of deaths (600,000 deaths each year). Due to metabolic syndrome and hepatitis, the incidence of liver cancer is increasing and there are few therapeutic options. Currently there is only one FDA-approved drug (Nexavar) that can enhance lifespan by only 3 months, with significant negative side effects. The BU research team has shown that transcription factor Late SV40 (LSF) is an oncogene for HCC, highly expressed in patient tumors, driving both tumor growth and metastasis. Their work has demonstrated that LSF inhibitors cause rapid death of HCC cells in vitro and that these inhibitors stop HCC growth in vivo (mouse models). There is a remarkable lack of side effects/toxicity in the mouse models. With the Ignition Award, they will perform a detailed toxicological assessment of compounds; assess the pharmacokinetic and oral availability; and determine the LSF biological targets that lead to cell death in HCC upon treatment with inhibitors. Through licensing, they anticipate that they will be able to develop new small molecule LSF inhibitors and a biomarker for early stage disease.

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Dr. Warkentin's research highlighted in the Smithsonian

Dec 20, 2012

Dr. Karen Warkentin's research on the red-eyed treefrog was recently highlighted in the Smithsonian magazine. In the article, "How the Treefrog Has Redefined Our View of Biology," Dr. Warkentin explains how the frog egg?s surprising responsiveness epitomizes a revolutionary concept in biology called phenotypic plasticity, which is the flexibility an organism shows in translating its genes into physical features and actions.

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Dr. Segre's research highlighted on the ENG website

Nov 20, 2012

Dr. Daniel Segre's research was recently highlighted on the Engineering and Bioinformatics websites in and article entitled, "New research could help trace source of bioterror agents." Dr. Segre, along with colleague Yannis Paschalidis and others from Harvard and University of Texas seeks to establish clear links between bacterial cells? growth conditions and their resulting composition by developing and testing advanced mathematical methods which could lead to new ways to track the source of a bacterial pathogen, and to help discriminate between natural infectious outbreaks and the deliberate spread of pathogens.

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Prof. Pam Templer co-authors article in Boston Globe

Oct 17, 2012

Prof. Pam Templer co-authored an article on climate change with David Sleeper for the Boston Sunday Globe Magazine. The article, entitled, "A climate change call to arms," warns that while this year's winter weather predictions call for more snow, we should not be fooled. Indeed, Prof. Templer's research shows that both the local and global temperatures are rising.

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Dr. Mullen's Research featured in Science Daily

May 17, 2012

Assistant Professor Sean Mullen's genome research featured in Science Daily. Dr. Mullen, has discovered promiscuous sharing of large regions of DNA code among species by sequencing the genome of a South American butterfly. A first for science, the genome sequencing work is the product of an international group of researchers, dubbed the Heliconius Genome Consortium, who examined the genome of the Postman butterfly (Heliconius melpomene), a well-known species that lives in the Peruvian Amazon. Using that data as a guide, they then examined the genetic make-up of two other closely-related butterfly species -- Heliconius timareta and Heliconius elevatus.

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Prof. Primack and Alum Miller-Rushing in NY Times

Apr 19, 2012

Prof. Richard Primack and former doctoral student, Dr. Abe Miller-Rushing published an article, "Early Bloomers", in the April 18, 2012 edition of the New York Times. Using the detailed journals of Henry David Thoreau, Drs. Primack and Miller-Rushing were able to chart the trend towards earlier blooms and concluded that spring is indeed arriving earlier than in years past.

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Undergraduate Gordon Towne's research on BU Today.

Apr 17, 2012

Undergrad Gordon Towne's UROP-funded research was recently featured on BU Today. Gordon has been working with Dr. Tom Kunz on his project to map the flight patterns of bats. This research is benefitting multiple disciplines including biology, engineering and could lead to the creation of new unmanned military planes. In the article, "Inquiring Minds: Tracking Bats", Gordon discusses how the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) funded his travel to Texas to help Dr. Kunz with this project. Please click on the video below to learn more about Gordon's research.
Watch this video on YouTube

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Dr. Hansen's research featured on BU Today.

Apr 12, 2012

Dr. Ulla Hansen's research on liver cancer was recently featured on BU Today. The article, "Taking On Cancer: Tackling Liver Cancer in the Lab" discusses Dr. Hansen's discovery that the same protein, transcription factor LSF, also referred to as late SV40 factor, appears to play a role in the growth of liver cancers. Understanding that role could be the key to a treatment for the deadly disease.

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Dr. Buston's research on cover of Proc. R. Soc. B

Apr 05, 2012

Dr. Pete Buston's research was featured on the May 22, 2012 cover of Proceedings of the Royal Society. In the article entitled, "Probability of successful larval dispersal declines fivefold over 1 km in a coral reef fish" Dr. Buston and collaborators address a fundamental question of marine ecology: how far do larvae disperse? The cover photograph shows a clown anemonefish as it takes shelter in an anemone on the wall of a lagoon adjacent to Kimbe Island, Papua New Guinea.

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Dr. Templer's Research featured on BU Today

Mar 29, 2012

Assistant Professor, Pam Templer's research on the impact of snow-challenged winters was featured on BU Today's website. Now in the fourth year of field studies at experimental forests in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, Dr. Templer is studying the way shrinking snow cover?consider this year?s nearly snowless winter?affects the robustness and future of New England forests.
Watch this video on YouTube

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Dr. Buston's research featured in Bostonia Magazine

Jan 27, 2012

Dr. Peter Buston's research on clownfish was recently featured in Bostonia Magazine. The article entitled, "Excellent Swimmer, Great Personality" explains how Dr. Buston's research has shown that the clownfish show both distinct and consistent behavior.

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Dr. Kaufman Awarded Top Conservation Honor

Jan 27, 2012

Dr. Les Kaufman received the Parker/Gentry Award from the Field Museum in Chicago December 1, 2011 reports Bostonia Magazine. This is one of the highest honors given for work in conservation. The award, given annually since 1996, honors an individual, team, or organization whose efforts have impacted conservation and serve as a model for others.

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Dr. Buston's research highlighted on BU Today

Nov 30, 2011

Clown Fish

Dr. Pete Buston's research on clown fish was recently highlighted on BU Today.  Dr. Buston and his students have observed that there are distinct personalities amongst these attractive fish.  Dr. Buston's lab has discovered that particular traits among the fish are consistent.  Some clown fish are more social than others and can be observed exploring further away from their protective homes than others in their group.  Why a variety of personalities in a single species is maintained by natural selection is one of the questions the Buston lab continues to explore.  

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Dr. Frydman's research featured Internationally.

Oct 21, 2011

Dr. Horacio Frydman lab's research on how the Wolbachia bacteria manipulates insect reproduction was published ahead of print in the journal, Science, and later picked up by the popular press on both national and international levels, including USA Today, The Scientist, BioTechniques, Le Nouvel Observateur (French journal), the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Russian International News Agency, and Spectrum (German news service) and Galileo (Italian science news journal).  Assistant Professor Horacio Frydman, graduate student Eva Fast and colleagues have provided new clues to the mystery as to how the bacteria interfere with their hosts.  This new knowledge may prove helpful in tackling human diseases that are carried by insects and parasitic worms.

 

Note: A link to download a full copy of the manuscript can be found here, under "lab news."

 

 

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Dr. Primack's research highlighted on BU Today and NPR

Oct 18, 2011

Dr. Richard Primack's research was highlighted on the BU Today website in the article, "Watching Climate Change from the Grounds and the Heavens" and on National Public Radio's show Here and Now.  Along with his graduate student, Caroline Polgar, Dr. Primack describes how they use remote sensing, data collected from the Boston Area Climate Experiment, and historical information, including old photographs and the detailed journals of Henry David Thoreau, to observe climate change.  From these sources, they are able to determine that spring leafing-out occurs on average 17 days earlier today than it did in Thoreau's time. 

A short video by (below), was included on the BU Today website.

Watch this video on YouTube
Watch this video on YouTube

 

Watch this video on YouTube

 

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Dr. Kunz honored by The Wildlife Society for his new book

Aug 26, 2011

Dr. Tom Kunz  was recently notified that The Wildlife Society has awarded him (along with his co-editor Stuart Parsons) The Outstanding Edited Book Award for his book entitled "Ecological and Behavioral Methods for the Study of Bats" (Johns Hopkins University Press, Balitomore, 2009).  Drs. Kunz and Parsons will be presented their award at the society's annual meeting in Kona, Hawaii on November, 6, 2011.

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Dr. Primack honored by Society for Conservation Biology

Aug 01, 2011

Dr. Richard Primack has been selected by the Society of Conservation Biology as the recipient of this year's Distinguished Service Award for his extraordinary contribution to conservation education worldwide through 27 translations of his conservation biology textbooks. In these books, examples from each country are added in by local co-authors.

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Dr. Warkentin's research featured on journal's cover

Jul 06, 2011

Dr. Karen Warkentin's research was the featured in the July 2011 issue of  Integrative & Comparative Biology.  Her photograph of tadpoles (early & late-hatched red-eyed treefrogs) grace the cover.  Also included are the papers from the "Environmentally Cued Hatching Across Taxa" symposium that Dr. Warkentin and two of her colleagues organized for the January 2011 SICB meetings.

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Dr. Man's research highlighted in Science

May 02, 2011

Dr. Hengye Man and his graduate student, Stephen Amato, together with colleagues from the Harvard and Yale medical schools, published a paper in Science demonstrating a critical role of the energy sensing pathway in the development of dendritic vs axonal polarity of neurons.  This work describes a fundamental process in the development of mammalian nervous system.

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Dr. Mullen's research featured in BU Today

Mar 07, 2011

Dr. Sean Mullen's research on the genetic basis of coloration in butterfly wings. has been featured in the BU Today article, "The Secrets of Butterfly Wings."  Dr. Mullen, along with Harvard University evolutionary biologist Marcus Kronforst, were awarded a $980,000 grant from the National Science Foundation in November 2010 to unlock the genetic mysteries of diversity.  While focusing on why one species of butterfly evolved to have a similar apprearance as a poisonous one, their research can have far reaching implications in the understanding of larger issues such as the process of natural selection and genetic disease.

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Dr. Tom Kunz named Distinguished Professor

Mar 04, 2011

Dr. Tom Kunz has been named a William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor. This is the highest honor bestowed by Boston University to recognize the contributions of our most valued faculty members in research, scholarship and teaching. Clearly a well-deserved recognition of Dr. Kunz's leadership and many accomplishments both at Boston University and as one of the world's leading authorities on the evolution, ecology, and behavior of bats.  Read more about Dr. Kunz's latest accomplishment on BU Today

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Dr. Gilmore Leads Renewal of Beckman Scholars Program

Mar 02, 2011

Dr. Tom Gilmore, Professor of Biology and Director of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP), was Principal Investigator on a Beckman Scholars Program grant funded for the next three years by the Arnold & Mabel Beckman Foundation as of June 2011. This is one of the most highly coveted and competitive awards for undergraduate research in the US: the Beckman Foundation invited ~140 schools to apply and funded 9 applications. Notably, this is the fifth time that BU has received this prestigious award. The award will provide two summers and two academic years of support for 6 Biology, BMB or BME students to perform research with one of 15 faculty from Biology, Chemistry or BME. All of these faculty have distinguished themselves as mentors of undergraduate research. Comments Gilmore, "This grant provides early-stage and sustained research support for some of our best undergraduate researchers; it has served as a stepping-stone for entrance to top-tier PhD programs for several students over the past decade or so."
 

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Dr. Kunz's research featured on over 75 news outlets

Mar 01, 2011

Dr. Tom Kunz and his former post-doc Dr. Winifred Frick's research on aeroecology was recently featured on over 75 news outlets, blogs and websites, including the BBC, BU Today, Surveillance Of the Aerosphere Using Weather Radar, and Voice of America.  Drs. Kunz and Frick took part in a panel discussion at the recent AAAS conference where many reporters were on hand to hear about their advances. 

Aeroecology, or the study of birds, bats and flying insects could transform the use of technology designed for tracking storms.  For more information, visit the Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology's website.  To view a video clip of Dr. Kunz's research, go to the CAS website.

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Drs. Finnerty & Gilmore's research featured in MCB journal

Feb 10, 2011

Research led by Biology PhD student Francis Wolenski

Research led by Biology PhD student Francis Wolenski is featured on the cover of the March, 2011 issue of the journal, Molecular and Cellular Biology. This paper is the product of an ongoing NSF-funded collaborative project between the labs of Drs. John Finnerty and Tom Gilmore. In this paper, the authors describe for the first time the molecular components of the NF-kB signaling pathway in a simple marine organism, the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. These results have interesting evolutionary implications, as the NF-kB pathway is important in humans for proper immune responses and is misregulated in many cancers. Also contributing to the paper were postdoctoral fellow Michael Garbati, PhD students Tristan Lubinski, Nikki Traylor-Knowles, Derek Stefanik and undergraduates Erica Dresselhaus and Haley Goucher. In addition to NSF, funding for this project came from NIH, Conservation International, the Warren-McLeod Fellowship Program, New England Biolabs and the BU Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP).
 

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Dr. Finzi's research featured in Bostonia

Oct 06, 2010

Adrien Finzi

Dr. Adrien Finzi's research on the effects of rising greenhouse gases was recently featured in Bostonia magazine. In the article, "Trees of Life: Can forests save the earth from greenhouse gases?", Dr. Finzi discusses his research, which is furthering the understanding of how forests respond to increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.  A short video, below, was included on the Bostonia website.
 
"Trees of Life" Video by Devin Hahn for Bostonia Magazine
Watch this video on YouTube

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Michael Sorenson named Chair of Biology

Jul 15, 2010

Michael Sorenson

Prof. Michael Sorenson has accepted the position of Chair of the Biology Department effective 1 June 2010.  He replaces Prof. Cooper who is now an Associate Dean for the College of Arts and Sciences.  Prof. Sorenson received his PhD from the University of Minnesota in 1990 and came to Boston University in 1998.   He has taught Introductory Biology, Behavioral Ecology, Population Genetics, and Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution.  His research focuses on the evolutionary ecology of brood parasitic birds. 

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Geof Cooper appointed Associate Dean

Jul 15, 2010

Geof Cooper

After serving the Biology Department as Chair for 13 years, Prof. Geof Cooper has accepted the position of Associate Dean of the Faculty for the Natural Sciences.  Dean Sapiro thanked Prof. Cooper for his years of dedicated service and noted that he will be “moving to service on a broader scope across the sciences.”   Prof. Cooper stated in his announcement to the Biology faculty, “I have greatly enjoyed working with you as chair, and look forward to continuing to work with you both in my new post and as your colleague.”

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Gary Jacobson Retires After 31 Years of Service

Jul 15, 2010

Gary Jacoboson

Professor Gary Jacobson retires after 31 years at BU Dept of Biology. Professor Gary Jacobson received his PhD from Stanford University in 1974 and began his career at Boston University in 1979. His research focused on bacterial biochemistry and physiology.  Dr. Jacobson founded the BMB/MCBB program, one of the first interdisciplinary programs in the sciences, and served in various leadership roles, including Associate Chair, Chair ad interim, and Director of the Biology Department.

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National attention for Red-Eyed Treefrog Research

May 24, 2010

Frog fight

Dr. Karen Warkentin and recent graduate, Dr. Michael Caldwell, have received national attention for their research on the vibration behavior of the red-eyed treefrog.  Dr. Caldwell conducted his dissertation work on the red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas) in Dr. Warkentin's lab and studied how frogs use vibrational information for predator avoidance and communication.  Their research was recently highlighted in National Geographic, Science Now, Discover Magazine, Live Science, The New York Times, and NPR's Science Fridays. Additionally, their research was featured on the cover of the June 2010 edition of Current Biology.

 

"Rumble in the Jungle" by Flora Lichtman, NPR Science Fridays

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Dr. Karen Warkentin's photo selected as cover art for textbook

Apr 27, 2010

Dr. Karen Warkentin provided the image that is on the cover of the newest edition of Developmental Biology, by Scott F. Gilbert, a reference text-book for teaching developmental biology, published by Sinauer Associates.

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Dr. Kunz's research reaches national audience

Sep 08, 2009

Dr. Tom Kunz's research on white-nose syndrome reached a national audience when it was featured on the CBS Evening News on September 7, 2009.  The U.S. bat population is declining at a frightening rate due to the fungus and Daniel Sieberg's report featured Dr. Kunz and other researchers who are struggling to solve this devastating mystery.  In addition to being featured on the Evening News, Dr. Kunz's research was highlighted on the CBS News website and on BU Today.  Continued attention on this ecologically important crisis will hopefully aid in discovering a way to stop the fungus that is killing off the bat population at an alarming rate. 

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Dr. Kaufman receives Partners in Conservation Award.

Aug 31, 2009

Congratulations to Dr. Les Kaufman and his team who were recently honored for their work on the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary.  Dr. Kaufman's Long-Term Monitoring Program has received a Partners in Conservation award from the Department of the Interior.  The award recognizes the team's work over several years monitoring coral reef health in the Flower Gardens Banks National Marine Sanctuary.  In presenting the award, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar noted that it was a testament to the work of Les' team that "the Flower Garden Banks in the Gulf of Mexico are among the healthiest reefs not only in the Western Hemisphere, but in the world."
 

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Dr. Sorenson, Fellow of the American Ornithologists' Union

Aug 19, 2009

Dr. Mike Sorenson was recently made a Fellow of the American Ornithologists' Union at the annual conference in Philadelphia.  Fellows are be chosen for exceptional and sustained contributions to ornithology and/or service to the Union.

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Dr. Kunz addresses Congress on White-nose Syndrome

Jul 21, 2009

Dr. Kunz (far right) testifies before Congress

Dr. Tom Kunz recently testified at a Joint House Subcommitte of Congress on White-Nose Syndrome in bats  He also was a guest on 'Voice of America' in June to discuss the spread of this devastating disease.  For more information on White-Nose Syndrome, view the short video on Dr. Kunz's research which aired on both the Voice of America website and YouTube.

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Dr. Gilmore wins the 2009 Metcalf Cup and Prize

May 01, 2009

Congratulations to Dr. Tom Gilmore, recipient of the 2009 Metcalf Cup and Prize for teaching excellence. For more about Dr. Gilmore and his enthusiasm for teaching, read the BU Today article, "Making Molecular Biology Less Scary." 

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Dr. Warkentin's research featured on NSF website

Feb 06, 2009

Dr. Warkentin's research featured on the National Science Foundation's website in an article entiteld Vibrational Cues for Embryos.

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Dr. Segre's research featured in Journal of Bacteriology

Dec 12, 2008

Dr. Daniel Segrè's research was featured on the January 2009 cover of the Journal of Bacteriology. The paper that is the result of a collaboration between Dr. Segre's lab and the lab of Salomon Amar, from the BU School of Dental Medicine.

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Dr. Karen Warkentin?s research highlghted in the Boston Globe

Nov 24, 2008

Dr. Karen Warkentin's research on tree frogs was highlighted in the Nov. 24, 2008 edition of the Boston Globe.  In "Fear and Loathing in the Tropics:  Frogs Adapt to Survive", Dr. Warkentin's discusses on how tree frogs have developed in response to their environments and learned to adapt to difficult conditions.

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Prof. Kunz's research featured on the NSF website

Nov 17, 2008

Prof. Tom Kunz's bat research was recently highlighted in the National Science Foundations's web blog.  Gwen Morgan, one of the media specialists at NSF,  posted a blog, "Placing a Dollar Value on Services Provided by Bats," that summarizes Prof. Kunz's ongoing NSF-funded research.

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Prof. Kunz's research highlighted on the NSF website

Oct 30, 2008

Prof. Kunz's bat research was recently highlighted on the NSF website.  On the Oct. 28 blog entitled, "'Gone Bats' Over Aeroecology", Prof. Kunz's research is discussed and specifically, how the study of bat behavior contributes to the field of Aeroecology: how and why airborne organisms--bats, birds, arthropods and microbes--depend on the support of the atmosphere closest to Earth's surface.

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Prof. Kunz's research featured on National Public Radio

Oct 28, 2008

Prof. Tom Kunz was featured on NPR's Living On Earthradio show recently.  Accompanied by host Bruce Gellerman, Prof. Kunz went into a local bat cave to try and solve the mystery of the a recent die-off in bat population.  In the segment entitled, "Fly-by-night Murder Mystery", Prof. Kunz discusses the new fungus that may be behind the drop in population.  You can listen to the radio segment at NPR's website.

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Prof. Primack's research highlighted in NY Times

Oct 28, 2008

Prof. Richard Primack's research was recently highlighted in both the NY Times and The Boston Globe.   In both "Thoreau Is Rediscovered as a Climatologist" and "Troubling Toll in Thoreau's Backyard", respecitively, Prof. Primack discusses how Henry David Thoreau's original observations can be used to track changes in the global climate. 

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Prof. Les Kaufman's research featured in Bostonia

Oct 20, 2008

Les Kaufman out on the Stellwagen Bank.

Prof. Les Kaufman's research has helped shape the draft of a five-year management plan for Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, one of the most important fishing areas in the North Atlantic.  In the article, Gone Fishing, Prof Kaufman weighs in on the future of this vital resource. Read more and view a video interview with Prof. Kaufman on the Bostonia website. 

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Dr. Finnerty featured in BU Today

Sep 12, 2008

BU Today highlights Dr. John Finnerty's research; The tiny sea anemone from the salt marshes of New England reveal some of the secrets of evolution.  Read more about the Finnerty lab's research in The Sea Anemone's Secret of Evolution. 

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Prof. Kunz is made honorary member of the ASM

Aug 22, 2008

Congratulations to Prof. Tom Kunz, who was elected as an Honorary Member of the American Society of Mammalogists in August 2008. This is the highest award given by the Society and recognizes Tom's many distinguished contributions to mammalogy.

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Prof. Kunz highlighted in The Boston Globe

Aug 21, 2008

Prof. Tom Kunz's research was recently featured in The Boston Globe on August 18,2008 in an article entitled, "Look up, he says, where bats live."

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Prof. Primack awarded Guggenheim Fellowship

May 01, 2008

Professor Richard Primack has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to study "Climate change in Thoreau's Concord." His research was recently featured on the New York Times website. Dr. Primack spoke in April to the University in a lecture entitled, What Would Thoreau Think? Global Warming at Walden Pond. His research was also highlighted in an article in the Smithsonian and National Wildlife magazines.

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Prof. Les Kaufman featured in the BU Today

Mar 14, 2008

Prof. Les Kaufman's research on the fish population of Lake Victoria was featured in the BU Today article, Nightmare of Global Proportions.

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Prof. Michael Baum featured in BU Today

Feb 14, 2008

Prof. Michael Baum's research was featured in a BU Today article entitled Scents and Sensibility. Professors Michael Baum and James Cherry have found new links between scent and sexual attraction, which may bolster the case for human pheromones.

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In Memorium: Professor Mary S. Erskine

Jan 23, 2008

On January 14, 2008 the Boston University community remembered their friend and colleague, Mary S. Erskine, who died on December 12, 2007, following a long battle with breast cancer. She was 61 years old. Mary was both a College of Arts and Sciences professor of biology and former director of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP). For more information, please read the profile on BU Today.

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Sir Hans Kornberg Honored

Jan 19, 2008

Sir Hans Kornberg was honored at a symposium at Boston University on January 19, 2008.  The speakers included: Antonio M. Gotto Jr. (Professor of Medicine and Dean, Weill Medical School Cornell University), Peter J. F. Henderson (Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Leeds), H. Ronald Kaback (Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, University of California Los Angeles), William Kay (Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry, University of Victoria, President and CEO, Microtek), Antonio H. Romano (Professor Emeritus of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Dean Emeritus, University of Connecticut), William Whelan (Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine), Christopher Lourenco (Graduate Student, Boston University), and Andrew Sproul (Graduate Student, Columbia University).

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Prof. Traniello Research mentioned in Bostonia

Nov 01, 2007

Prof. James Traniello's research and NSF grant award was featured in the Fall 2007 issue of Bostonia, Notes from Underground.

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Dr. Warkentin featured in National Geographic

Dec 08, 2006

Dr. Karen Warkentin's research on the red-eyed tree frog was featured in the November 2006 issue of National Geographic magazine and also in the USA Today article, Science snapshot: Frog eggs tuned to bad vibrations.

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Prof. Kunz Research Highlighted in Globe, BU Today, NYT

Jul 16, 2006

Prof. Tom Kunz's research on bat ecology was featured in an article entitled "Going Batty" in the July 16 issue of The Boston Globe magazine. His research was also featured in the January 22, 2008 issue of BU Today and in an article in the New York Times on March 25, 2008 and in the May 4th edition of the Boston Globe.

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Dr. Wachowiak featured in the Globe

Mar 22, 2006

Dr. Matt Wachowiak's research on how the nervous system processes information about odors was featured in the May 22, 2006 issue of The Boston Globe: How the nose knows.

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Faculty Awards

  • From CAS News: "Tim Gardner, Assistant Professor of Biology, has been chosen for the 2014–15 Innovation Career Development Professorship. The Innovation Career Development Professorship is a prestigious award that provides a three-year, nonrenewable stipend designed to support scholarly or creative work. Gardner will work on two main projects. First, he will study the sensory-motor learning in songbirds to better understand the cell-type-specific rules underlying vocal learning. Second, he will seek to engineer new electrode arrays for peripheral nerve stimulation, which he anticipates will be useful for treating medical conditions such as asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, and infertility, among others."

  • Gilmore’s dedication to research and instruction has earned him the 2014 United Methodist Scholar/Teacher of the Year Award. Endowed by the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry of the United Methodist Church, the award recognizes outstanding scholarship and contributions to the learning arts and the University.

    Read more from BU Today's article, "CAS Biologist Gilmore is United Methodist Scholar/Teacher of the Year."

  • CAS Metcalf winner, Professor John Finnerty, uses games to help lessons stick. Read more about Professor Finnerty and his approach to teaching at BU Today.

  • Professor Karen Warkentin’s research has led to the discovery of predator-induced early hatching in many frogs. Glassfrogs are the latest addition to the Warkentin Lab’s study organisms, and the focus of Jesse Delia’s PhD research on the evolution of parental care and hatching plasticity. Prof. Warkentin served as an advisor for this National Geographic project and her former student Myra Hughey (PhD 2011) assisted the film crew in Costa Rica.

     

  • Dr. Richard Primack has been selected by the Society of Conservation Biology as the recipient of this year's Distinguished Service Award for his extraordinary contribution to conservation education worldwide through 27 translations of his conservation biology textbooks. In these books, examples from each country are added in by local co-authors.

  • Congratulations to Dr. Tom Gilmore, recipient of the 2009 Metcalf Cup and Prize for teaching excellence. For more about Dr. Gilmore and his enthusiasm for teaching, read the BU Today article, "Making Molecular Biology Less Scary." 

  • Congratulations to Prof. Tom Kunz, who was elected as an Honorary Member of the American Society of Mammalogists in August 2008. This is the highest award given by the Society and recognizes Tom's many distinguished contributions to mammalogy.
  • Prof. Vince Dionne was awarded the College of Arts and Sciences Prize for Excellence in Student Advising.
  • Prof. Eric Widmaier wins Metcalf Award for Excellence in Teaching in May 2007.
  • Dr. John Finnerty was awarded the College of Arts Sciences 2006 Gitner Award for Distinguished Teaching.
  • Prof. Stjepko Golubic was co-author on a paper in Coral Reefs that received the journal's 2005 Best Paper Award.

Recent Faculty Publications

    Prof. Jennifer Talbot published in PNAS

    Apr 18, 2014

    Prof. Jennifer Talbot's manuscript "Endemism and functional convergence across the North American soil mycobiome" was published in PNAS on April 17th. This study is about the distribution & function of soil microorganisms across N. America.

    The Stanford News has made a press release, also published April 17th.

    View this article...

    Jelle Atema featured on BU Today

    Feb 25, 2014

    What a Shark Nose Knows

    CAS professor biology and adjunct scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Jelle Atema works with graduate student, Ashley Jennings, to decipher how sharks smell by experimenting on locally caught sharks that live happily in lab pools. Atema and another graduate student, Jayne Gardiner, discovered that sharks turn in the direction of the nostril that first detects a prey’s odor and can therefore smell their prey within seconds no matter how chaotically dispersed the odor plume is.

    Read the full article at: http://www.bu.edu/today/2013/sharks-sense-of-smell/

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    Prof. Karen Warkentin Published in Oecologia

    Nov 29, 2013

    Prof. Warkentin is co-author of the article “Behavioral plasticity mitigates risk across environments and predators during anuran metamorphosis,” which appears in the November issue of Oecologica. Warkentin and colleagues conducted a study examining predator-prey interactions of red-eyed tree frogs and various (aquatic or semi-terrestrial) predators across metamorphosis. They used these interactions to quantify “how frog behavior changes across metamorphic development, habitats, and predator presence or absence.”

    Read more>>

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    Templer's Research Featured in Scientific American

    Jul 01, 2013

    Dr. Pamela Templer's work appears in the July 2013 issue

    Professor Templer’s work on the effects of climate change appears in the July 2013 issue of Scientific American. In an article entitled “Wired Forest May Reveal How New England Forests Respond to Climate Change” by Stephanie Paige Ogburn and Climatewire, Templer discusses how she is working to simulate rising temperatures by wiring the soil of a New Hampshire forest. This project will hopefully shed more light on the consequences of climate warming on local trees and how climate change will affect New England. Read the full article

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    Dr. Buston's research on cover of Proc. R. Soc. B

    Apr 05, 2012

    Dr. Pete Buston's research was featured on the May 22, 2012 cover of Proceedings of the Royal Society. In the article entitled, "Probability of successful larval dispersal declines fivefold over 1 km in a coral reef fish" Dr. Buston and collaborators address a fundamental question of marine ecology: how far do larvae disperse? The cover photograph shows a clown anemonefish as it takes shelter in an anemone on the wall of a lagoon adjacent to Kimbe Island, Papua New Guinea.

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    Dr. Warkentin's research featured on journal's cover

    Jul 06, 2011

    Dr. Karen Warkentin's research was the featured in the July 2011 issue of  Integrative & Comparative Biology.  Her photograph of tadpoles (early & late-hatched red-eyed treefrogs) grace the cover.  Also included are the papers from the "Environmentally Cued Hatching Across Taxa" symposium that Dr. Warkentin and two of her colleagues organized for the January 2011 SICB meetings.

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    Dr. Man's research highlighted in Science

    May 02, 2011

    Dr. Hengye Man and his graduate student, Stephen Amato, together with colleagues from the Harvard and Yale medical schools, published a paper in Science demonstrating a critical role of the energy sensing pathway in the development of dendritic vs axonal polarity of neurons.  This work describes a fundamental process in the development of mammalian nervous system.

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    Ryder and Mertl's research published in PLos One.

    Dec 13, 2010

    Alumni, Drs. Kari Ryder Wilkie and Amy Mertl, along with Prof. James Traniello, reported in PLoS One on the results of the first inventory of the ants of Tiputini.   Identifying 489 species in only 0.16 square kilometers and projecting actual richness to be 647-736 species, this region of western Amazonia appears to support the most diverse ant fauna yet recorded.

     

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    Dr. Templer's research featured in Ecosystems.

    Nov 15, 2010

    Dr. Pam Templer's research was recently featured in Ecosystems.  The article, entitled, "Effects of the hemlock woolly adelgid on nitrogen losses from urban and rural northern forest ecosystems ," summarizes her research on the fluxes of nitrogen in both the Arnold Arboretum in Boston, MA and a rural forest at Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. 

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    Post doc and Graduate Student publish in Science

    Sep 15, 2010

    Postdoc Winifred Frick and graduate student Kate Langwig, both members of Dr. Tom Kunz's laboratory, contributed to a recent article published in Science. Their research on white nose syndrome in bats was featured in Science's August 6, 2010 edition. 

    View this article...

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