BU Alum, Ysabel Giraldo (GRS ’14), Published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B

By ChristinaFebruary 5th, 2016in Alumni News, News

Ysabel Giraldo

BU PhD and Traniello lab alum, Ysabel Giraldo, is the lead author of “Lifespan behavioural and neural resilience in a social insect,” which was recently published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Ysabel’s thesis research at BU formed the basis of the paper and earned her the prestigious Belamarich Award for best Biology dissertation. The study found that behavioral performance did not decline in ‘elderly” Pheidole dentata minor worker ants, and that cell death in the brain did not increase with age.

Research from the paper has been featured in BU Today as well as several other science news outlets including: Discover Magazine, The Smithsonian, Der Spiegel, Futurity, and Science 360.

Talbot Lab student Sasha Vivelo receives Graduate Writing Fellowship

By Meredith J CanodeJanuary 6th, 2016in News, Student News

Sasha Vivelo of the Jennifer Talbot lab is the recipient of the The CAS Writing Program’s Graduate Writing Fellowship for Fall 2016.

SashaViveloGraduate Writing Fellowships provide doctoral students from across the university with an opportunity to receive valuable training and teaching experience while serving as instructors in the CAS Writing Program. The Writing Program offers upwards of 375 undergraduate writing seminars each year, making it the largest instructional unit in the College of Arts & Sciences.

Graduate Writing Fellows teach one course per semester. These fellowships are highly competitive.

Congratulations Sasha on this achievement!

Primack lab graduate student Lucy Zipf wins Maine Sea Grant Program Development Grant

By Meredith J CanodeJanuary 6th, 2016in News, Student News

Graduate student Lucy Zipf of the Richard Primack Lab has won a Maine Sea Grant Program Development Grant for her work on the effects of sea-level rise in marshes in Acadia National Park.

Lucy Zipf in the field

Maine Sea Grant is one of 32 NOAA Sea Grant programs throughout the coastal and Great Lakes states. The network is a powerful resource for sharing information and solving problems.

Sea Grant programs in the region (Maine, New Hampshire, MIT and WHOI, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New York) have established the Northeast Sea Grant Consortium through a memorandum of understanding that outlines processes to encourage collaboration.

Congratulations, Lucy!

Congratulations to Winners of the 2015 GSI Research Symposium!

By Meredith J CanodeNovember 24th, 2015in News, Student News

The Department of Biology is pleased to announce two student winners who participated in the won Seventh Annual Genome Science Institute (GSI) Research Symposium at Boston University School of Medicine.

Oral Award Recipient: Bryan Matthews (Graduate Biology, Waxman Lab), for his presentation of “The Role of Nuclear Organization in Liver Sexual Dimorphism”

Poster Award Recipient:  Zackary Hintze (Undergraduate Biology, McCall Lab), for his poster titled “Analysis of Nuclear Architectural Changes Throughout Apoptotic vs. Non-Apoptotic Cell Death”

Congratulations Bryan and Zackary on your success!

Faculty Search: 3 positions (Systems Biology (2) and Marine Population Genomics)

The Department of Biology is conducting a search for 3 new faculty members.

Systems Biology, Boston University (2 positions)

The Department of Biology invites applications for two tenure-track Assistant Professors in systems biology, broadly defined, beginning July 1, 2016. We seek candidates integrating experimental biology, advanced technologies (e.g., genomics, proteomics, microfluidics, single-cell analysis), quantitative analysis and/or mathematical/computational modeling to study the dynamical properties of biological systems. Areas of interest include epigenomics, signaling networks and microbial systems, and their application to developmental biology or studies of disease. Applicants must have a PhD in a relevant field and are expected to have postdoctoral experience and a strong publication record. Responsibilities include establishing a research program with extramural funding, teaching at both the graduate and undergraduate levels, and participating in Biology, MCBB and Bioinformatics graduate programs. The successful candidates will join a strong and growing interdisciplinary research community at Boston University and will be offered modern laboratory facilities, a competitive salary and start-up package.

Review of applications will begin November 2, 2015. Please use AcademicJobsOnline to submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statements of research and teaching interests, and three representative reprints, and arrange for three letters of reference to be submitted through the same website. Inquiries can be addressed to Frank Naya (fnaya@bu.edu), Chair, Systems Biology Search Committee. Please visit the following websites for additional information about the Biology Department and BU’s interdisciplinary programs in Molecular, Cell Biology, & Biochemistry and Bioinformatics.

We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. We are a VEVRAA Federal Contractor. Women and minorities are especially encouraged to apply.

Marine Population Genomics, Boston University

As part of a major initiative in Marine Global Change, the BU Marine Program and the Department of Biology invite applications for a tenure-track assistant professor position in Marine Population Genomics, starting July 1, 2016. We seek a candidate using genomic approaches to investigate how marine organisms and populations respond to the effects of global climate change, such as ocean acidification and warming.

Applicants must have a PhD in a relevant field, postdoctoral experience, and a strong publication record. Responsibilities include establishing a research program with extramural funding, and teaching at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. Teaching would include a research-based course in the Marine Semester, as well as a lecture course in the Biology Department curriculum. In addition to being an active participant in the Marine Program, the successful candidate will join a strong and growing genomics research community at Boston University, including possible participation in BU’s graduate program in Bioinformatics. The successful candidate will be offered newly renovated laboratory facilities as well as a competitive salary and start-up package. Review of applications will begin November 1, 2015.

Please submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statements of research and teaching interests, and three representative reprints, and arrange for three letters of reference to AcademicJobsOnline. Inquiries can be addressed to John R. Finnerty (jrf3@bu.edu), Chair, Marine Population Genomics Search Committee.

Please visit the following websites for additional information about the Marine Program, the Biology Department and Bioinformatics Program.

We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. We are a VEVRAA Federal Contractor. Women and minorities are especially encouraged to apply.

“The Man Saving All the Bats” Nate Fuller talks bats on WBUR

By Meredith J CanodeNovember 10th, 2015in News, Student News

Graduate student Nate Fuller of the Tom Kunz and Michael Sorenson lab talks biology, bats, and white-nose syndrome on the light hearted show “You’re the Expert” on WBUR.

Screen Shot 2015-11-10 at 10.34.54 AM

Comedians Jo Firestone, Ken Reid, and Josh Sharp get to the bottom of exactly what that means for his day-to-day life, the less-than-glamorous side of field work, whether vampires are real, and the ideal first date for a bat biologist.

Graduate Student Ben Carr in DC on Knauss Fellowship

By Meredith J CanodeNovember 10th, 2015in News, Student News

Ben Carr, a graduate student in the Les Kaufman lab has spent 2015 in Washington, DC as an Executive Fellow on a Knauss Fellowship. Ben is serving as the Executive Secretariat to the Council of NOAA Fellows.

Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 8.26.13 AM

Started in 1979, the John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship connects outstanding graduate students with a host office in the Executive or Legislative branches of the government for one year in Washington, DC. Executive fellows are the majority of each Knauss class; they represent about 80% of the 2015 class. Executive fellows hold diverse positions in their host offices, including science communication, legislative affairs, fishery management, renewable energy, and more.

The 2015 executive fellows represent a wealth of academic backgrounds. Nearly half of the 42 fellows have or are in the process of completing a doctorate degree in biological sciences, with specialties including marine science, oceanography, biology, fisheries, zoology, environmental science, and environmental engineering.  Many chose to apply as an executive fellow to gain experience in a federal agency and to learn about how the science policy of the administration is carried out.

Dr. Talbot receives Outstanding Mentor Award

By ChristinaOctober 30th, 2015in Faculty News, News

12112299_991789157530112_5552292685834114947_n

Dr. Jennifer Talbot was one of four recipients to receive an Outstanding Mentor Award at the 18th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium. This award recognizes mentors for their commitment to helping students in their research.

Dr. Talbot was nominated by Shayan Avanessian, CAS—Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Lidimarie Trujillo, University of Puerto Rico—Biology

“Dr. Talbot’s patience was incredible and her advising capabilities really allowed me to develop into a true researcher.” -Shayan

“Dr. Talbot gave me a completely new view on what research is, and what it means to me not only as a researcher but also when applied in the greater context of science.” -Lidimarie

View photos from the 18th Annual UROP Symposium.

Congratulations, Dr. Talbot!