Scenarios are important in public health training, especially in emergency preparedness but also in other areas. Public and environmental health professionals play key roles in identifying the causes, assessing harm, and making decisions about response. For four consecutive years, Boston University Superfund Basic Research Program Outreach Core created and organized scenarios for students ages 14-18 in collaboration with Outreach Core partners in Boston University School of Public Health’s Department of Environmental Health, and Boston Area Health Education Center (BAHEC); A program of the Boston Public Health Commission. Today these scenarios are organized by collaborators of the Boston Univeristy Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Environmental Exposures and Health.

We use the example of our most popular scenario (dioxin-contaminated
chicken) to show users of this site how the scenario works. However, we have
also done additional scenarios which you can learn about on this site. All
scenarios teach students about a current environmental health issue, and how
to make informed decisions requiring a combination of critical thinking,
analytic skills and problem solving skills.

The scenario event is inexpensive and based almost entirely on in-kind contributions of time and space. With resources on this site, any organization can replicate our efforts. We think it will be useful for both adults and children, for graduate and undergraduate students, youth organizations, schools, and other venues where young people are the focus.

For more information contact:

Michelle Lee Urbano, Director
Boston Area Health Education Center
Boston Public Health Commission
One Boston Medical Center Place, NEB-2
Boston, MA 02118
Telephone: 617-534-5617
Main Line: 617-534-5258
Fax: 617-534-5761
Email: Michelle_Urbano@bphc.org

or

Madeleine Kangsen Scammell
Boston University School of Public Health Department of Environmental Health
715 Albany St. Talbot 2E
Boston, MA 02118
Tel. 617-638-4454
Fax. 617-638-5818
Email: mls@bu.edu

Supported with funding from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences' Superfund Basic Research Program

Boston University Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Environmental Exposures and Health