Misora Hibari and the Popular Music of Cold War Japan: Mimesis, Alterity, Cosmopolitanism

Starts:
5:00 pm on Thursday, April 11, 2013
Ends:
7:00 pm on Thursday, April 11, 2013
Location:
KENMORE CLASSROOM BUILDING, 565 COMMONWEALTH AVE, ROOM 101
URL:
http://www.bu.edu/asian/2013/03/26/misora-hibari-the-popular-music-of-cold-war-japan-mimesis-alterity-cosmopolitanism/
Join us for a lecture by Michael Bourdaghs, Professor in Modern Japanese Literature at the University of Chicago. Misora Hibari (1937-1989) was Cold War Japan's most important and influential popular singer. In his book Sayonara Amerika, Sayonara Nippon: A Geopolitical Prehistory of J-Pop (2012), Michael Bourdaghs explored Hibari's performances as negotiations of the complex interrelationship between the "mimesis" ("imitation") of American pop music and various icons of Japanese cultural authenticity. In this lecture, Bourdaghs will revisit and rethink this argument in relation to Michael Taussig's influential theories of mimesis, exploring in particular the significance of the cosmopolitanism evident in many of Hibari's recordings from the 1950s and 60s. Michael Bourdaghs teaches modern Japanese literature, intellectual history, popular music, and literary and critical theory at the University of the Chicago. He is the author of Sayonara Amerika, Sayonara Nippon: A Geopolitical History of J-Pop (Columbia University Press, 2012) and of The Dawn that Never Comes: Shimazaki Tōson and Japanese Nationalism (2003). He has also edited several books, most recently The Linguistic Turn in Contemporary Japanese Literary Studies: Textuality, Language, Politics. (University of Michigan Center for Japanese Studies (2010). Co-sponsored by BUCSA and BU Department of Modern Languages and Comparative Literatures