• Joel Brown

    Staff Writer

    Joel Brown

    Joel Brown is a staff writer at BU Today and Bostonia magazine. He’s written more than 700 stories for the Boston Globe and has also written for the Boston Herald and the Greenfield Recorder. Profile

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There are 2 comments on Vertex Gives $1.5 Million to New BU Center for Antiracist Research

  1. If Dr. Kewalramani shows up for a dedication ceremony, perhaps Dr. Kendi could ask her about the moral consequences of pricing their cystic fibrosis drug Orkambi at about $250,000 per patient per year.

    From a NYT article: “Despite its lukewarm reception, Orkambi has been a boon for Vertex. In 2017, the drug was its top-selling product, bringing in about $1.3 billion in sales, a considerable sum for a product that is only approved to treat about 28,000 people worldwide.”

  2. Many thanks to Vertex for its contribution to BU’s new Center for Antiracist Research. I understand the point that Perryd wants to make. Fixing an issue like this would require, however, a complete overhaul of the pharmaceutical industry as it functions in this country–a project long overdue. That said, the dynamic in question relates to the entire situation of many U.S. institutions of higher education, one in which they feel compelled to bolster endowments by seeking donations from large companies and wealthy individuals. If you dig into the past and present activities of many US corporations, you are likely to find abundant dirty laundry. In the case of individuals, you need look no further than Jeffrey Epstein’s relationship with MIT and Harvard. Unless we decide to fund our colleges and universities in a completely different manner, we will inevitably be able pick bones the way Perryd does with this contribution. At least in this case, the contribution is going toward a bonafide good cause–unlike many of the other causes for which money gets pumped into U.S. higher education. (Here I would include, in passing, the money provided by the US government for “defense related” research.)

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