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There are 20 comments on Are We “Brain Washed” during Sleep?

  1. This is the “tide” in the CSF which is happening all the time, not only during sleep. Craniosacral Therapy works with this tide by sensing the movement and helping its potency to improve health. Finally we have science confirm what has been known by many for decades

    1. you are exactly right. i find it remarkable that they think this is some sort of new knowledge. There are disciplines from the osteopath profession to craniosacral therapists that manipulate these patterns.

      dont get me wrong, glad they are “learning” this but the fact that they just now learned this is the only thing i see remarkable here.

  2. This is exciting research – but one parameter has not been mentioned: the make-up of CSF.

    Just as our hormone profiles change over time – and many people’s health is improved by addition or subtraction to create a better balance – so we should not suppose that the recipe for CSF is stable over time, or exactly the same between individuals.

    It may be that part of the aging process is the deteriorating quality of CSF. If this is the case, then the proteins responsible for eg Alzheimer’s may be present all the time, but the nature of the CSF during youth is good enough to wash them all away. But if the quality of CFS decays then progressively the cleansing operation will be less and less effective. It follows, therefore, that if the CFS could be re-optimised it may be that much more efficient cleansing could still take place. Indeed it may be that one could identify the specific functions of different elements of the CSF ‘soup’.

    At a deeper level it would be most interesting to establish the causes of the changing recipe of CSF.

    1. Fascinating. I suspect CSF is responsible for more than waste removal, though. It’d be interesting to see CSF flow and activity over 24hrs to compare activity and patterns.

  3. I would like to participate in a study like this. I’d do it for free. I’ve had over a dozen MRIs and did a sleep study once to determine whether I had sleep apnea (I didn’t). I’ve got fairly aggressive tinnitus, so noise isn’t the problem that it is for a lot of people when it comes to sleeping. I actually find that I sleep best when listening to the right kind of music (tends to mitigate the tinnitus).
    Always been a light intermittent sleeper though, don’t like drugs (ambien, etc.), maybe melatonin once in a while.

  4. I am prompted to think about the individual who is blocking out the noise from the MRI machine during sleep, much like the focus occurring in meditation. Could this CSF wave patterns pathophysiology be related to the same effects of the healing properties of meditative effects of meditation.

  5. I would love to help with this study also. I have Chiari Malformation and have been decommissioned and a csf Rhinorrhea and I feel I could bring a lot to the plate. Having many different situations would give a big picture of how the brain works with people who actually have issues, not just people who are say well. This would also be great to do on someone awake to I’d think or is this wave that happens only happens when you’re sleeping? I’d love to be apart of any study that has to do with csf and finding a cure for me!!!!

  6. Is it ethical to pose a research question which asks how the blood, CSF, and neurons balance in the brain? I think that is not the question, but, rather, “Is the brain regulated by a homeostasis which we can enhance?”

  7. I’d love to participate in this study. I always fall asleep in an MRI tube, but have trouble sleeping in my bed. This might Zander’s the question..”why?”.

  8. Only in the last couple of years are people starting to listen to the connection between sleep and degenerative neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s. Interestingly, the VA has published studies relating this over the last several years. The concept of the glymphatic system is still resisted by healthcare and somewhat ignored by pharma. Sleep is nature’s medicine. This is misunderstood by many in medicine. Airway patency is crucial in children, to avoid the many times mistaken diagnosis of ADD, and the neurological consequences if not dealt with in children. FOr many it all comes down to sleep , and the right type, deep (slow wave) sleep. This stuff in the study is really cool!!!

  9. Can a similar study be initiated on the subjects during meditation. May reveal more insights on the correlation between the two Ms, Mental health and medicine.

  10. I find this interesting. As I have learned to meditate to a deep level of relaxation I hear a rhythmic flow. It sounds in my ears like putting your ear to a conch shell.

  11. To say that CSF flows into the head or though the brain is not quite right. CSFis synthesized in the head by choroid plexus and secreted into the ventricles. It then flows over the brain matter in the subarachnoid space, not actually through the brain itself.

    The pressure homeostasis hypothesis is more plausible than is let on. We know that high O2 and low CO2 causes vasoconstriction (narrowing of blood vessels) which decreases blood flow into the head. The choroid plexus would then ramp up secretion of CSF. There may be some overshoot, causing a pressure difference and a CSF “pulse” that restores normal intracranial pressure.

    Results in the older group would be interesting. If CSF pulses are less frequent we could target CSF production to improve toxin clearance and prevent degenerative disease.

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