• Nathan Phillips

    Nathan Phillips is a College of Arts & Sciences professor of earth and environment and can be reached at nathan@bu.edu. Profile

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There are 8 comments on POV: Why BU Should Divest from Fossil Fuel Companies

  1. Divestment says that we must stop commissioning a decades-to-centuries lock-in of fossil fuel infrastructure, and proclaims that we have the power to do so—to conserve and build cleaner, decentralized energy and power systems. We will build political empowerment, social empowerment, economic empowerment, energy empowerment.

  2. “Divestment says that we must stop commissioning a decades-to-centuries lock-in of fossil fuel infrastructure, and proclaims that we have the power to do so—to conserve and build cleaner, decentralized energy and power systems. We will build political empowerment, social empowerment, economic empowerment, energy empowerment.”

    While you’re doing all this, who heats the house and sends juice o the lights?

  3. We need comprehensive legislation to address exploitation of the planet. If we can’t learn to be good stewards of the environment, how can we reasonably expect people to care for each other in the context of a community? While Professor Phillips offers compelling reasons to divest, his lack of bi-partisan dynamism, which I would describe as stubborness, plays into the problem as much as a culture of corporate indifference. We need to work together to make this happen and, as a life-long Democrat, I question President Obama’s leadership in this regard, amount others, and regret the rhetorical jab at his predecessor.

  4. In this article Professor Phillips complains vaguely about corporate interest and our addiction to fossil fuels. I’m confused, Is it corporations who are making us use electricity and gasoline?

  5. There is no scientific evidence to support any impact of greenhouse gases on the climate. If the trajectory of a storm takes it into the path of growing populations and their infrastructure, it does not mean the instance or intensity of such is increasing or decreasing.

    1. I would kindly disagree with your statement by directing you here:

      http://www.ipcc.ch/

      This is a link the the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The IPCC is a scientific body under the auspices of the United Nations, that reviews and assesses the most recent scientific, technical and socio-economic information produced worldwide relevant to the understanding of climate change. They have concluded that he atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amounts of
      snow and ice have diminished, and sea level has risen. They have also concluded that these changes are due to human activity, namely greenhouse gases.

      1. With all due respect, the IPCC is a governmental (i.e. political) body, some of whose members are scientists. Its conclusions are presented as being more certain than the data support.

        Dissenting scientific views can be found here: http://wattsupwiththat.com/

        The moralistic case for divestiture is likewise deficient. For a dissenting view, read The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels by Alex Epstein.

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