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There are 10 comments on The Climate Crisis: Why the Earth Is Warming

  1. The article is well written. However, I would have liked a more succinct description of how the third theory was tackled. It seems like the author of this article did not quite get the science on this one.

    1. In fact, after listening to the video I feel the following line “For the study, Anderson assumed that there is some unknown source of heat, and proposed that the source added as much heat to the climate system as all of the greenhouse gases combined. ”

      should have read

      “For the study, Anderson assumed that there is some unknown source of heat, and CALCULATED THE ADDITIONAL HEAT THAT WOULD BE ADDED TO THE OCEANS ON TOP OF WHAT IS ALREADY BEING ADDED BECAUSE OF GREENHOUSE GASSES.”

      Even then, it would have been nice to get some idea behind what the assumptions were behind the calculation.

  2. Excellent piece of research!
    Digging deep into the interplay of factors controlling temperature variability is a first step and will have a broad impact on the understanding of how these factors actually tune the uncertainty in model projections of temperature.

  3. The extra heat that warmed up the oceans was found over 5 years ago. I would suggest you look up the earth’s albedo variation. All the heat necessary to warm up the oceans as observed, with plenty left over to be radiated into space is there. CO2 may be having an effect, but it is relatively small.

  4. The best and most elegant science always asks the most basic questions in a way that the hypotheses can be tested. I am very intrigued by this study and impressed with the results. Wish I would have thought to do it myself. Well done!!!

  5. I am wondering how much life on earth is worth to the coal burning plant owners. Also how much it is worth to the people that say,” We don’t have global warming. ” We do, and if nothing is done the human race will be extinct in 200 years or sooner. Sad!

  6. Global warming is not the issue of a single nation. If we didn’t respond to it in a proper way then our upcoming generations has to be struggle for their survival.

  7. It’s an interesting piece of research but there is something that’s bothering me. Assume that the researchers are correct and that the increase in temperature is a direct effect of the CO2 in the atmosphere (which has already been proven before). There is no evidence, not in this study and not in any other studies, that this is a direct effect of human behavior. In fact, CO2 levels have been going up and down since the beginning of time, even without any human presence. I’m not saying that human activity is not contributing at all but there is a chance that we’re not able to change anything to the variations in CO2 at all. Therefore I would suggest we start looking at ways to deal with global warming instead of figuring out who is to blame.

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