Tagged: ASOR

BU Archaeology Professor Michael Danti spoke at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

September 23rd, 2014

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Office of the Spokesperson

For Immediate Release September 21, 2014

STATEMENT BY JEN PSAKI, SPOKESPERSON

Threats to Cultural Heritage in Iraq and Syria

Secretary of State John Kerry will join the Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas Campbell, and its president, Emily Rafferty, on September 22 to highlight the destruction of irreplaceable cultural heritage taking place throughout Iraq and Syria at the hands of violent extremists like the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant and the Syrian regime.

The event, to be held at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City amid the United Nations General Assembly week, will feature a presentation by Professor Michael Danti and remarks from Secretary Kerry, Director General of UNESCO Irina Bakova, and other distinguished members of the preservation and museum community.

As the United States responds to the violence in Iraq and Syria that has destroyed millions of lives and caused enormous suffering to the region’s people, we also remain deeply concerned about the destruction of cultural heritage in these areas of tragic conflict. Ancient treasures have now become casualties of continuing warfare and looting and are targets for destruction

Historic monuments and archaeological sites of the world, which enrich modern societies by connecting all of us to our cultural origins and informing our identities, must be preserved.

The unique cultural heritage of both Iraq and Syria represent an historical sequence of human development from ancient times to the present day. The Department of State remains committed to preserving these countries’ ancient cultures and joins international partners, intergovernmental organizations, and other institutions in advancing efforts to protect and restore this heritage.

UNESCO Website coverage click here.

Professor Michael Danti part of a team to save Syria’s heritage

August 5th, 2014

On August 4, 2014, the U.S. Department of State and the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) signed a $600,000 cooperative agreement to document comprehensively the current condition of cultural heritage sites in Syria and assess future restoration, preservation, and protection needs. ASOR’s documentation and planning will raise global awareness of the threats to Syria’s cultural heritage and identify immediate or future projects and assistance that can be carried out and provided inside Syria. ASOR’s Syrian Heritage Initiative—Planning for Safeguarding Heritage Sites in Syria is led by five co-directors / co-principal investigators: Scott Branting (ASOR), Jesse Casana (University of Arkansas), Michael Danti (Boston University and ASOR), Abdal-Razzaq Moaz (Indiana University and ASOR), and Andrew Vaughn (ASOR). LeeAnn Barnes Gordon (ASOR) serves as Project Manager for Conservation and Heritage Preservation. The international team also includes more than 30 additional scholars and specialists who will serve as co-investigators, consultants, or advisors.  Click here to read more.

Professor Danti “Kurdish Heritage on the Fast Track”

July 15th, 2014

The Situation Today

Following decades of quiescence, these are exciting times for archaeology in the KRG (Kurdistan Regional Government). And over the last four years, American archaeologists and cultural heritage experts have witnessed firsthand the rapid development of the cultural heritage situation in Iraqi Kurdistan.  Read more click here

Professor Runnels wine cellar discovery interview

December 2nd, 2013

Curtis Runnels, an archaeologist at Boston University, called the finding significant not only in showing the sophistication of the wine, but also in suggesting that it was meant specifically for palace use. He noted that the chemical analysis showed each jar held wine from the same recipe, showing the “consistency and control you’d expect in a palace.”

Read more

“Ask An Archaeologist!” NEW EPISODE

September 23rd, 2013

Friends of ASOR present “Ask an Archaeologist,” a brand new YouTube series dedicated to finding out what you and your students want to know about Archaeology. The series is based on questions submitted by viewers. Viewer’s questions will be answered by professional archaeologists with years of experience.

“Ask An Archaeologist” provides reliable, entertaining and educational information about Archaeology in video form. It is also a opportunity to connect students with professional archaeologists around the world.

We are currently, and always, accepting questions. This could be used as a group or individual activity challenging students to create interesting questions, answered by real archaeologists, and viewed by thousands of people around the world.

To submit questions:

Email questions to ASORmedia@gmail.com with the subject “Ask An Archaeologist”.
Use #AskAnArchaeologist on twitter or facebook.
Tweet us directly @AmerSchOrietRes
Comment on our facebook page.
We are also accepting video question submissions.

HERE ARE SOME OF THE INTERVIEWS:

Ask an Archaeologist Promo – September 18, 2013 with Allison Ripley, AR Graduate Student

Ask an Archaeologist Episode 1 – September 18, 2013 with Professor Andrea Berlin

Ask an Archaeologist Episode 2 – October 8, 2013 with Dr. Travis Parno