News

SOCIETY FOR LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT Symposium at Boston University

Published: November 3rd, 2014

The Society for Language Development announces this year’s Symposium

The Representation of Number: Origins and Development

Invited Speakers:

Elizabeth Spelke, Harvard University

Elizabeth Brannon, Duke University

Jessica Cantlon, University of Rochester

Thursday, November 6, from 1:00 – 6:00 pm

George Sherman Union
Boston University
775 Commonwealth Ave.

A reception will follow

To pre-register for the symposium, as well as the BU Conference on Language Development, go to http://www.bu.edu/bucld/conference-info/registration/

BUCLD home page: http://www.bu.edu/bucld/

The cost of registration for the symposium is $20 for members, $10 for student members; $50 for non-members, $25 for student non-members

SLD Student Award:

The Society for Language Development invites applications for the SLD Student Award. This award is intended to help defray the costs of attending the Symposium, for graduate students who are presenting papers or posters at BUCLD. The award includes a year’s free membership in the Society for Language Development, free admission to this year’s SLD Symposium, and a cash award of $75. Applicants should send a CV and their accepted BUCLD abstract (paper, poster, or alternate status) by email to Cynthia Fisher at clfishe@illinois.edu ; applications are due by Oct 1. Up to two graduate students whose CVs show a record of achievement and of sustained interest in interdisciplinary research will be selected. Award recipients will be notified by email before the conference (approximately Oct 15), and the awards will be announced at the SLD Symposium on Thursday November 6.

 

Source: http://www.bcs.rochester.edu/sld/symposium.html

Workshop on Indo-European and Historical Linguistics at Harvard University

Published: November 3rd, 2014

Speaker: Thomas Palaima (University of Texas at Austin)

Title: “Mycenaean Kingship Ideology in Its Cultural Context: megaron, thronos, skēptron

Date: Friday, November 7 at 4:00 p.m., Boylston Hall 105

As always, there will be a reception after the talk in the Linguistics department (Boylston Hall, 3rd floor) to which you are all invited!

Local Talk at MIT: Towards a Unified Analysis of the Linguistic Development of Down Syndrome

Published: November 3rd, 2014

Speaker: Christiana Christodoulou (MIT Brain & Cognitive Sciences)
Title: Towards a Unified Analysis of the Linguistic Development of Down Syndrome
Date/Time: Thursday, November 6, 12:30-1:45pm
Location:
32-D461

“Previous studies on the linguistic development of individuals diagnosed with Down Syndrome (DS) report both phonetic/phonological as well as morphosyntactic impairment. To date, there has not been any research on the effects of phonetic/phonological restrictions on inflectional marking, nor a theoretical analysis of the distinct performance of individuals with DS. Cypriot Greek individuals with DS exhibit distinct articulation and phonological difficulties that affect the production of inflectional marking. Once those are factored out, results reveal high accuracy rates (over 95%) with aspect, tense, person, number and case. In this talk I deal with the small residue of differences, which were morphosyntactically conditioned, and argue that the use of alternative forms exhibit a clear preference for the default value of each inflectional feature. I provide a unified analysis couched within the Distributed Morphology framework, covering both morphosyntactic as well as phonological differences. I suggest that failure to use the targeted form and the consistency in using default values derives from failure of the Subset Principle to fully apply.”

Talk at MIT: Syllables or Intervals? Welsh cynghanedd lusg rhymes

Published: October 31st, 2014

Date: Nov. 3 (M)

Time: 5:00 – 6:30
Location: 32D-461
Speaker: Gretchen Kern
Title: Syllables or Intervals? Welsh cynghanedd lusg rhymes
This talk will present my data and some preliminary analysis on my ongoing work on cynghanedd lusg, a type of line-internal, word-internal rhyme in Welsh poetry, based on a corpus of the works of Dafydd ap Gwilym. In these rhymes, the stressed penultimate vowel of a polysyllabic line-final word (and some number of following consonants) will correspond to the final vowel and any following consonants of a word earlier in the line.
(1) Ganed o’i fodd er goddef                                                       (Credo, line 25)
In many examples, the rhyme domain consists of the entire interval (even in consonant clusters) but some will have unanswered consonants in the line-final word:
(2) a. Mi a wn blas o lasgoed                                                   (Merch Gyndyn, line 31)

b. I waered yn grwm gwmpas,                                              (Gwahodd Dyddgu, line 25)
c. ‘Nychlyd f
ardd, ni’th gâr harddfun,                                  (Cyngor y Bioden, line 65)

This is similar, but not exactly like skaldic rhyme, where the unanswered consonants appear in the word on the left (3c):
(3) a. hann rekkir lið bannat                                           (from Háttatal, by Sturluson)

b. ungr stillir sá, milli (via Ryan 2010:5)
c. G
andvíkr, jǫfurr, landi

“Of mice and (of) men: Phonological influences on the omissibility of French ‘de’ in coordination”: A Talk by Dr. Kie Zuraw, Associate Professor of Linguistics at UCLA

Published: October 30th, 2014

Screen shot 2014-10-30 at 11.09.52 AM

Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition

Published: October 30th, 2014

Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition

Date: 04-Mar-2015 – 06-Mar-2015
Location: Bloomington, Indiana, USA
Contact Person: David Stringer
Meeting Email: gasla@indiana.edu
Web Site: http://www.iub.edu/~gasla

Linguistic Field(s): Language Acquisition

Call Deadline: 07-Nov-2014

Meeting Description:

GASLA brings together researchers working on the nature, use and development of interlanguage, in all contexts of bilingual and multilingual acquisition.

Featured Speakers:

Rex A. Sprouse, Indiana University
Alison Gabriele, University of Kansas
Tania Ionin, University of Illinois
Philippe Prévost, Université de Tours

For more information, see the conference website:

http://www.iub.edu/~gasla/

Final Call for Papers:

In response to requests from colleagues, the submission deadline for GASLA 2015 is extended to November 7, 2014.

GASLA 2015 Special session: Motivating change in second language acquisition:
Submissions are invited in any sub-area of linguistics that addresses the process of second language acquisition: the psycholinguistic mechanisms that drive it, the nature of developmental stages, the nature of triggers, or the role of second language input in inducing the development of interlanguage grammars, among other topics.

Abstracts should be anonymous, 500 words in length, single spaced, with the title centered at top of the page in bold. The word count must be provided at the bottom of the page. References, examples, tables and figures may appear on a second page and are not included in the word count. Indicate [special session] to flag the abstract for the special session.

Abstracts must be submitted by November 7, 2014. Authors will be notified shortly after November 30, 2014.

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LINGUIST List: Vol-25-4301
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5th Cambridge Conference on Language Endangerment

Published: October 30th, 2014

5th Cambridge Conference on Language Endangerment

Date: 31-Jul-2015 – 31-Jul-2015
Location: Cambridge, United Kingdom
Contact Person: Mari Jones
Meeting Email: mcj11@cam.ac.uk
Web Site: http://www.mml.cam.ac.uk/news/fifth-cambridge-conference-language-endangerment

Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics; Language Acquisition; Language Documentation; Sociolinguistics

Call Deadline: 01-Apr-2015

Meeting Description:

Language Endangerment and the Speaker: Alternative Identities, New Speech Communities and Changing Linguistic Norms

Ensuring an increase in speaker numbers is a crucial part of the successful revitalisation of an endangered language. These efforts often target schoolchildren, in the hope of re-establishing communication between generations in the endangered language, and other age-groups, who identify with the cultural context of the endangered language but who may have been denied the opportunity of acquiring it via intergenerational transmission. The recruitment of ‘new’ speakers can therefore often have a marked effect on the existing endangered language speech community in terms of its social makeup, its identity and its language practices.

Call for Papers:

This conference invites papers that reflect on these issues: To what extent should reversing language shift incorporate identity planning? How do the actors of revitalization persuade members of the ‘dominant’ speech community that their current identity would be enhanced by its repackaging to include the endangered language? How successful has formal education actually been in both increasing speaker numbers and, crucially, in transmitting the endangered language in a different way? Do ‘new’ speakers use the endangered languages in different ways from ‘traditional’ speakers and to what extent do these two groups in fact interact with each other? Do the linguistic norms and practices of ‘new’ speakers vary from those of the ‘traditional’ speakers? Does the speech of ‘new’ speakers reveal evidence of innovative linguistic features?

Abstracts: (200 words maximum) to be submitted via email to Mari Jones (mcj11@cam.ac.uk) by April 1, 2015

Paper format: 20 minutes + 10 minutes for questions

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LINGUIST List: Vol-25-4302
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The Developmental Science Colloquium Committee will be hosting a talk given by Dr. David Lewkowicz of Northeastern University next Wednesday, October 29th.

Published: October 22nd, 2014

The Developmental Science Colloquium Committee will be hosting a talk given by Dr. David Lewkowicz of Northeastern University next Wednesday, October 29th.


His talk is entitled, “The development of multisensory perception & communication in infancy & beyond”

Abstract:
I will argue that our daily environment is, by default, multisensory in nature and, therefore, that to understand the development of communication, we need to understand infant perception of multisensory information. To support this argument, I will review recent studies from our lab in which we have investigated infant perception of audio-visual relations, learning of audiovisual sequences, and the role of early experience in the emergence of cognitive expertise via the process of perceptual narrowing.

IMPORTANT: If any professors are planning to invite their classes, please let us know in advance so that we can make room accommodations, thank you!

The talk will be held at 3:30PM in room 150 of the Psychological & Brain Sciences Department (64 Cummington Mall) and refreshments will be provided.

Conceptualizing, Investigating, and Practicing Multilingualism and Multiculturalism

Published: October 20th, 2014

Conceptualizing, Investigating, and Practicing Multilingualism and Multiculturalism

Date: 27-Feb-2015 – 28-Feb-2015
Location: Washington, DC, USA
Contact Person: Christina Butler
Meeting Email: GUGradConference@gmail.com
Web Site: https://sites.google.com/site/gugradconference/

Linguistic Field(s): Anthropological Linguistics; Applied Linguistics; General Linguistics; Ling & Literature; Sociolinguistics

Call Deadline: 03-Nov-2014

Meeting Description:

Georgetown University Graduate Student Conference
Conceptualizing, Investigating, and Practicing Multilingualism and Multiculturalism
February 27-28, 2015

In light of widespread globalization, we are interested in definitions of multi/translingualism, multi/transculturalism, and related terms that move away from essentialized and idealized notions of the nation-state. We are also interested in exploring the critical relationships between how multilingualism/multiculturalism is acquired in educational and other contexts, reflected upon and portrayed in artistic-literary-social media, and acknowledged, valued, or rejected in political and institutional action. Our graduate student conference engages multilingualism and multiculturalism with an explicitly critical orientation in order to refine these terms in light of research and practice in literary and visual cultural criticism, history, linguistics, anthropology, and second/third/foreign language teaching and learning.

Keynote Speakers:

Heidi Byrnes, Georgetown University
Anna De Fina, Georgetown University

Our conference will begin 27 Feb. at 3:00pm and end 28 Feb. at 7:00pm.

For more information, visit us: https://sites.google.com/site/gugradconference/

2nd Call for Papers:

Extended deadline: 3 November 2014

With the publication of the Modern Language Association’s 2007 Report ”Foreign Languages and Higher Education: New Structures for a Changed World”, the terms multilingualism and multiculturalism have received heightened attention and been expanded to include the ideas of translingual and transcultural competence. While many scholars have defined multilingualism as the ability to communicate in more than one language (Cenoz, Hufeisen, & Jessner, 2003; Li, 2008), other conceptualizations, particularly those influenced by third language acquisition studies and functional definitions of language, reconceive multilingualism as the ability to use multiple languages as resources contingent upon communicative needs and social contexts (Cenoz, 2013). Even as definitions of multilingualism expand, as seen in scholarly contributions to the Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 33, (2013), it is still refracted most typically through the lens of monolingualism and conceptualized through nation-state-centered perspectives (Yildiz, 2012). To address this concern, scholarly work is now exploring such concepts as transculturalism and -lingualism, which are being defined as the studies of power relationships/formations and meaning-making in language throughout history as one acknowledges the multiplicity of one’s identity and position in the nation state (Cuccioletta, 2002; Lewis, 2002). Within this field, scholars (e.g., Appadurai, 1996; Bhaba, 1990; Mani, 2007; Seyhan, 2001) explore aesthetics, political claims, and such phenomena as cosmopolitan citizenship that unsettle concepts of home, belonging, and culture, which can redress the ruptures in history, collective memory, and language. In light of widespread globalization, we are interested in definitions of multi/translingualism, multi/transculturalism, and related terms that move away from essentialized and idealized notions of the nation-state (Cook, 1992; Kramsch, 2014). We are also interested in exploring the critical relationships between how multilingualism/culturalism is acquired in educational and other contexts, reflected upon and portrayed in artistic-literary-social media, and acknowledged, valued, or rejected in political and institutional action.

Keeping these foci and associated challenges in mind, our conference engages multilingualism and multiculturalism with an explicitly critical orientation in order to refine these terms in light of research and practice in literary and visual cultural criticism, history, linguistics, anthropology, and foreign language teaching and learning.

Possible topics for 20-minute presentations include but are not limited to:

- Pedagogical practices and implications of multilingualism/culturalism
- Multi/transcultural and multi/translingual practices and representations in literature, film, visual media, performance, etc.
- Politics of power and access in multilingual societies
- Governmental and institutional responsibilities in multilingual societies
- Multi/translingualism and the brain
- Bi/multilingual language acquisition
- Multilingualism and language assessment
- Globalization, migration, and transnational identities

Please submit abstracts of 250-300 words by 3 November 2014 to GUGradConference@gmail.com.

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LINGUIST List: Vol-25-4141
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1st International Symposium on Language Attitudes toward Portuguese, Spanish and Related Languages

Published: October 20th, 2014

1st International Symposium on Language Attitudes toward Portuguese, Spanish and Related Languages

Date: 08-Apr-2016 – 09-Apr-2016
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA
Contact Person: Talia Bugel
Meeting Email: bugelt@ipfw.edu

Linguistic Field(s): Sociolinguistics

Subject Language(s): Portuguese (por)
Spanish (spa)

Call Deadline: 30-Apr-2015

Meeting Description:

Keynote Speakers:

Patricia MagGregor-Mendoza, New Mexico State University
David Lasagabaster Herrarte, Universidad del País Vasco

This will be the first academic symposium fully devoted to the subject of language attitudes toward Portuguese, Spanish, and the languages that co-exist with these throughout the world. Fifty years of research on language attitudes have been enhanced by the contributions of Hispanic and Lusophone sociolinguists working with attitudes toward the languages in the Hispanic and the Lusophone world, as attested by the increase in the quantity and the quality of publications on the subject in local and international academic journals. This symposium will provide us with the opportunity to spend two full days dedicated to an update on the current status of our sub-discipline and to set our future direction.

Registration Fees:

Registration (before September 1, 2015): US$200
Late registration (after September 1, 2015): US$230
Students/Retired/Unemployed: 130 US$

The registration fee includes breakfast, lunch and coffee during breaks, both days of the conference.

Registration will start July 1, 2015

Call for Papers:

Categories of Submission:

1) Oral presentation (single or multiple authors; 20 minutes plus 8 minutes discussion)
2) Panel (up to 3 participants; one hour)
3) Poster

Abstract Specifications:

Minimum length: 300 words, maximum length: 500 words
Language: Portuguese, Spanish, English
Specify the category for which you apply: Presentation; panel; poster
Abstracts must be anonymous: Do not put your name or other identifying information on the abstract.

Reviewing process: Each abstract will be reviewed anonymously by three peers.

Important Dates:

Deadline for receipt of abstracts: April 30, 2015
Notification of acceptance of abstracts: July 1, 2015

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LINGUIST List: Vol-25-4139
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News