Jeffrey Johnson

Education

JPJ

  • PhD in Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences , Boston University (in progress)
  • MS in Speech-Language Pathology, Vanderbilt University, 2012
  • BA in English and Mass Communication, Miami University, 2005

Credentials

  • Certificate of Clinical Competence, Speech-Language Pathology (CCC-SLP)
  • Speech-language pathologist licensure in Massachusetts

Research interests

My interests include examining the effectiveness of current and new practices for the treatment of acquired impairments of oral and written language, maximization of treatment efficiency and generalization, and the identification and development of effective measures for behavioral outcomes. I am also interested in the neurobiological processes involved in language recovery and the use of established and emerging technology to further our understanding of these processes.

I am currently working on an analysis of treatment-induced changes in neural activity in selected brain regions in people with aphasia, as well as a behavioral study designed to identify effective therapeutic tasks for the recovery of reading and writing skills.

Publications

  • Johnson, J.P. & Kiran, S. (2014). Preserving the flexibility of single-subject experimental design—a commentary on “Optimising the design of intervention studies: critiques and ways forward.” Aphasiology, 29, 4-6.
  • Rousseau, B., Gutmann, M.L., Mau, T., Francis, D.O., Johnson, J.P., Novaleski, C.K., Vinson, K.N., & Garret, C.G. (2015). Randomized controlled trial of supplemental augmentative and alternative communication versus voice rest alone after phonomicrosurgery. Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, 152(3): 494-500.

Conference Presentations/Posters

  • Meier, E., Johnson, J., Villard, S. & Kiran, S. (2015). Does naming therapy make ordering in a restaurant easier?: Impairment versus function in aphasia. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention; Denver, CO.
  • Kiran, S., Kapse, K., Johnson, J.P., Martin, K., & Meier, E. (2015). Task based reorganization of function after rehabilitation in post-stroke aphasia. NeuroHAM Conference; Boston, MA.
  • Kiran, S., Kapse, K., Johnson, J.P., Martin, K., & Meier, E. (2015). Task based reorganization of function after rehabilitation in post-stroke aphasia. Organization for Human Brain Mapping Conference; Honolulu, HI.
  • Johnson, J., Gutmann, M., Friedman, J., Zeller, A., de Riesthal, M., Francis, D., Garrett, G., Vinson, K., & Rousseau, B. (2012). Voice rest and augmentative and alternative communication: a feasibility study. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention; Atlanta, GA.