2010 State of Africa Report

SOAR2010coverThe 2010 State of Africa Report was released in the Spring of 2011.

 

Governance Highlights

Benin

The government “has continued to assert its presence in the concert of nations by taking an active role in major debates within the United Nations…National solidarity is also reflected through the poor’s access to basic social services”, with the purpose of strengthening the national health care coverage. In addition, the government has focused on “strengthening the capacity of the courts and tribunals by the construction and renovation of infrastructure and the provision of competent personnel”.

Botswana

The government has shifted its focus from alleviation measures and achieving the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) to “halving poverty to a renewed moral commitment to eradicate absolute poverty with an emphasis on people-centered development through local enterprises”. Strengthened border, anti-corruption efforts, and a strong alliance between the country’s defense force and police service are just some of the steps that the Botswana government has taken to improve the state of the country.

Cape Verde

The government emphasized a need to strengthen “national unity and cohesion” to guarantee “security and political stability in the country”.

Ghana

The government adopted two methods for addressing corruption which include strengthening “the anti-corruption agencies of state to make them more effective,” and waging a “massive education campaign against corruption”.

Kenya

The government worked with the East African Community Common Market Protocol to “present an opportunity for increased wealth creation, job opportunities, and poverty eradication”.

Liberia

The Liberian government “committed to delivering to the people an improved system of governance that is more localized and more responsive to the needs and aspirations of its citizens”.

Malawi

“Malawi’s performance in all aspects of development remains a success story”. Malawi is determined to achieve all eight of the 2009 Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015. In the 2009/10 fiscal year, Malawi is focused on the implementation of agriculture and food security, water development, education, science, technology, transport infrastructure, environmental management, and public health.

Mali

Mali has moved from 350 kilometers of paved road in 1960 to 5,700 kilometers in 2010. Irrigation has grown from reaching only 50,000 hectares in 1960 to 345,240 today. Water supply has moved from providing to only two percent of the population to 73.34 percent in terms of access to clean drinking water. Electrical infrastructure has grown to being supplied by two mini power stations in 1960 to 19 autonomous power stations and six power stations of interconnected networks in 2010.

Mauritius

“Trade and development cooperation” have “witnessed a dramatic change with the enactment of the Africa Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) in 2000”.

Mozambique

The Deputies of Mozambique have applied themselves to the legislative process which constitutes “a demonstration of their dedication to the development…and to the strengthening of [the] democratic state based on the rule of law”.

Namibia

Namibia “witnessed the inauguration of the new members of the National Assembly and the President” after peaceful and democratic elections in 2009.

Nigeria

“Despite the serious challenges” Nigeria celebrates their nationhood and has “great cause to look forward to a brighter future”. “This is a time to look forward to the great opportunities and challenges that lie ahead for Nigeria”. The President, Goodluck Jonathan, is determined to fight corruption and demand transparency in the government.

Senegal

Senegal is determined to take up the “political, economic, and social challenges for prosperity of current and next generations”.

South Africa

The government’s departments are “committed to five priorities: education, health, rural development and land reform, creating decent work, and fighting crime”. They are also working to “improve the effectiveness of local government, infrastructure development, and human settlements”.

Tanzania

A major task of Tanzania is to ensure that “Tanzania remains one country and its people remain united, loving, and cooperating with one another in spite of differences in race, ethnicity, religion, origins, and political party affiliation.” They emphasize the need for “Tanzania to continue being a land of security, peace, and stability”.

Zambia

Parliamentary reforms have progressed in Zambia, “making parliament more effective and accessible to the public”.

Economic Highlights

Benin

A major priority for the country is to reduce its dependence on foreign energy; this will be achieved through the construction of an 80 megawatt thermal power plant in Maria Gléta, which will be completed in the upcoming year. The power generation sector will be open to private investment and the first solar power station will be built in Kandi. “The global financial and economic crisis disrupted the economic recovery that began in 2006”, and the government has undertaken efforts to return funds that were taken illegally to their applicants, without the use of public resources. The agricultural sector has also made great advances and is on its way to becoming “a dynamic and competitive agricultural power”.

Botswana

“Our overarching development goal remains the transformation of Botswana into a high-income economy that ensures the well-being of all.” To facilitate business development, the government has placed an emphasis on private sector growth, “signaling a P425 million increase in the value of new investments during the first quarter of this financial year”. The economy has contracted, due to a sharp decline in diamond demand. In response to this, the government has implemented several intervention programs, including the ISPAAD, as well as extended emergency support to various suffering businesses. ‘To mobilize NDP 10 budgetary support, the government has secured loans from the African Development Bank, amounting to just under P12 billion.

Cape Verde

Cape Verde has begun a process of “expansion and modernization of the infrastructure,” means of communication, and telecommunication.

Ghana

Ghana quickly “halted the rapid depreciation of the Cedi and by the middle of 2009, it had begun to appreciate against almost all the major currencies of the world,” giving the country “healthy economic conditions for real take-off into sustained growth”.

Kenya

The government continued to “implement the Kazi Kwa Vijana and the economic stimulus programmes that create employment opportunities for youth”.

Liberia

Liberia “met virtually all the performance criteria and benchmarks under the Poverty Reduction Growth Facility (PRGF) agreed with the IMF for 2009,” and was “on course with the implementation criteria for 2010”.

Malawi

Malawi has had consistent high economic growth rates since 2005. In 2008 when the world recession hit Malawi’s economy grew by 9.8 percent. “The forecast for 2010” is a “6.5 percent growth in real GDP”.

Mali

The “politico-administrative institutions” have reflected the political and economic choices in Mali and have “engaged the people of Mali in numerous worksites for national construction”.

Mauritius

Piracy is a serious threat to both African States in the Indian Ocean region as well as the greater international community. The international community has coordinated a response to this threat and has launched anti-piracy operations which have been “fairly effective in protecting vessels and in successfully deterring and disrupting pirate attacks”.

Mozambique

The real GDP of Mozambique grew at a rate of “nearly 8.5 percent”. “The management of public finances, fiscal and budgetary policy remain[s] oriented toward the achievement of the objectives established in the Five-Year Plan of the Government”.

Namibia

The global economic crisis affected Namibia just as it affected many other countries. Along with other actions, the government has increased public expenditure by an average of 27.9 percent in order to counter the impact of the economic crisis.

Senegal

The President of the Republic of Senegal has been attending the G8 Summits regularly and is optimistic about Senegal’s economic future.

South Africa

The global economic crisis set South Africa into their “first recession in 17 years”. Government, business, labour, and community representatives have agreed on measures to “reduce the scale and impact of the crisis”. Economic activity is rising in South Africa and they expect growth to continue moving forward.

Tanzania

Tanzania has made a great effort to empower the people and the local private sector to participate and benefit in the economy. This has been done by establishing funds, institutions, and new programs and streamlining the existing ones.

Zambia

The Zambian economy “demonstrated its resilience” through the global recession. The macroeconomic goals for 2010 were to “sustain positive growth and maintain macroeconomic stability”. The government has also set out to accelerate the “diversification programme to enhance the competitiveness of the economy to pursue infrastructure development”.


Civic Highlights

Benin

Benin has put significant emphasis on broadening the access to education, as well as improving the working conditions of teachers, through recruiting 4,500 new teachers in elementary schools, building new classrooms, and providing instructive materials. Several undertakings have occurred to preserve our heritage, including the restoration of some royal palaces and the organizing of several cultural events.

Botswana

The government’s efforts towards broadening the scope of education is unrelenting, with its promise to provide all Batswana with at least 10 years of basic education. Several hospital clinics and treatment centers have opened up to provide HIV testing, counseling, and anti-retroviral therapy (ART) services. The Youth Exchange and youth Exposition Programmes, among other organizations, has served to empower our youth in various training and sector-specific intervention programs. Gender equality has also stood at the forefront of the government’s role in the elimination of discrimination.

Cape Verde

The government vowed to promote “reforms and modernization” in order to put human development” as its highest priority,” and basing it on education and training.

Ghana

Ghana addressed homelessness by directing District Assemblies “to commit a substantial portion of their Common Fund allocations to rental housing” for “lower and lower-middle income groups”.

Kenya

“In the social sector, the Government has increased budgetary allocations by 20 percent in the current financial year. This has tremendously increased the number of educational institutions and student enrollment.”

Liberia

The government committed to the goal of “quality education” and initiated a “ten-year (2010-2020) National Education Sector plan”.

Malawi

“Information and civic education are critical to the socioeconomic development” of Malawi. The government “has continued to develop and implement programmes aimed at grooming children into productive and responsible citizens”.

Mali

“One of the requirements of democracy is…rigor in the management of public resources”. “Armed with values” the youth “will know how to amplify the vast worksites” that drive the development of Mali.

Mozambique

Schools for general and professional studies have had visible expansion and have played a role in the challenge of food and nutritional security by “developing and promoting techniques and technologies for the production and preservation of foods and the environment”.

Namibia

The Education and Training Sector Improvement Programme is working to ensure a 1:1 ratio of the availability of textbooks to students in critical subjects.

Nigeria

The Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health has recently funded a team of Nigerian scientists who discovered CD4 Lymphocyte baseline testing for people living with HIV/AIDS.

South Africa

South Africa is proud and impressed with the youth in the country, especially the “266 children from all provinces [who] participated in the pre-State of the Nation debate on the role of the youth in the fight against poverty”.

Tanzania

Tanzania plans to continue to allocate more funds to the budget of the health sector and to cooperate with religious organizations to offer health services. Education opportunities have been expanded greatly since 2005. Tanzania plans to continue this expansion and to put “more emphasis on improving the education being offered”.

Zambia

The main goal of the health sector  is to “provide the people of Zambia with equity of access to cost-effective, quality health care as close to the family as possible”. The main strategy for achieving this is “primary health care with special focus on maternal and child health”.