100 Level Courses

100 Level Courses

AN 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

This course is an introduction to the field of cultural anthropology. Cultural anthropology seeks to understand the variety of ways that humans organize their experience and live in the world, including different configurations of kinship, sex, gender, ethnicity, race, religion, politics, and economics. This course introduces students to some of that variety by examining how societies in different regions of the world differ and how both global and local social processes transform them. The course also explores the ways that anthropologists frame their inquiries and how over time they developed new approaches to these issues and to core concepts like culture and society. SS 4 cr.

AN 102 Human Biology, Behavior, and Evolution

Where did humans come from? How old is the Earth? Who are our closest living animal relatives and how does their behavior help us understand our own? When did our ancestors start walking on two legs? When did humans control fire? This course explores these and related questions through the examination of the scientific evidence for human origins and evolution. Lectures take up the most recent discoveries in genetics, primates, and human fossils and consider how they inform the human story. The laboratory portion of the class provides students with a hands-on experience, working with casts of human and ape bones, including some of the most famous human fossils ever found. NS (with lab) 4 cr.

AN 103 Anthropology Through Ethnography

This course is an introduction to the field of cultural anthropology. Cultural anthropology seeks to understand the variety of ways that humans organize their experience and live in the world, including different configurations of kinship, sex, gender, ethnicity, race, religion, politics, and economics. This course introduces students to some of that variety by examining how societies in different regions of the world differ and how both global and local social processes transform them. The course also explores the ways that anthropologists frame their inquiries and how over time they developed new approaches to these issues and to core concepts like culture and society.

This course is a seminar-style introduction to the field of cultural anthropology through the reading of ethnography. The small-class format provides for extended discussion and debate. Assignments consist of short essays every other week and a final exam. Equivalent to AN 101. SS 4 cr.