Spring 2014 Courses

This schedule is subject to change. For the most accurate information concerning other programs and departments, consult the University Class Schedule online: www.bu.edu/studentlink, as well as each department’s own website. Graduate students may not take courses below the 500 level for credit.

American Studies

CAS AM 200 – Introduction to American Studies. An exploration of the multi-faceted themes of American society and culture in selected historical periods using a variety of approaches to interpret such topics as American art, literature, politics, material culture, and the mass media. Required of AMNESP majors and minors. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. William D. Moore, Tuesday/Thursday 11:00am – 12:30pm.

CAS AM 313 – Internships in Public History. Students undertake supervised work in Boston-area institutions dedicated to the public presentation of America’s past. Students meet with the instructor to discuss themes in public history theory and practice that, together with the internship experience and related readings, inform a final research project and class presentation. Claire W. Dempsey, Tuesday 5:30pm – 7:30pm.

CAS AM 502 – Special Topics in American Studies: The American Cultural Landscape. This interdisciplinary research seminar challenges students to interpret the built environment as evidence of human activity. Buildings, landscapes, transportation networks, and religious compounds are examined as carriers of historical and cultural meaning. The field’s historiography is also addressed. William D. Moore, Thursday 2:00pm – 5:00pm.

CAS AM 553 – Documenting Historic Buildings and Landscapes. A seminar designed to train students in architectural research techniques through supervised reading, fieldwork, and writing. Students are introduced to the skills needed to conduct research on both individual resources and groups of resources, clustered within an area or scattered throughout a community. Also offered as CAS AH 553 and MET UA 553. Claire W. Dempsey, Wednesday 11:00am – 1:00pm.

African American Studies

CAS AA 380 – European Dimensions of the Black Diaspora.Relates the Black experience in modern Europe to that in the Americas by exploring religion, art, folklore, and politics in such places as England, interwar France, Nazi Germany, and Soviet Russia. Explicates racism, for example in European soccer. Also offered as CAS HI 360. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course entitled “Blacks in Modern Europe” that was previously numbered CAS HI 380.Allison Blakely, Friday 10:00am – 1:00pm.

CAS AA 489 – The African Diaspora in the Americas. Topic for Spring 2014: African American History in Global and Comparative Perspective. African American history in an international framework. Examines development of racial categories in early transatlantic trade, Black participation in armed conflict, diverse Black communities in the twentieth century. Also offered as CAS HI 489. Linda Heywood, Monday 3:00pm – 6:00pm.

CAS AA 580 – The History of Racial Thought. Study of racial thinking and feeling in Europe and the United States since the fifteenth century. Racial thinking in the context of Western encounters with non-European people and Jews; its relation to social, economic, cultural, and political trends. Also offered as CAS HI 580. Ronald Richardson, Wednesday 2:00pm – 5:00pm.

Archaeology

CAS AR 577 – Pots and Pans. Exploration of the food cultures and technologies through material culture – pots, pans, and utensils. Course will range broadly across cultures, time, and space with emphasis on medieval and early modern times. Life histories of humble, overlooked, everyday objects associated with food preparation and consumption; kitchens from prehistory to the present; tradition and fashion in cooking & dining vessels; pots and cooking technology; pots as metaphors & symbols. Also offered as MET ML 621. Mary C. Beaudry, Monday 6:00pm – 9:00pm.

English

CAS EN 220 – American Gothic. American writers seem to have a peculiar and deep-rooted fondness for gloomy mansions, characters buried alive, haunting secrets from the past, hypnotically powerful villains, and corpses that won’t stay dead. From Poe to Hitchcock to Toni Morrison, the Gothic mode never loses its ability to rivet us to the page or screen. Why are these stories so compelling? Why are we so fascinated by these characters who face situations so extreme, so incomparable to the events of “real life”? And how do Gothic stories change over time? Are the things that terrify in the late eighteenth-century (which is when the first Gothic novels appear) the same as the things that terrify us now? In this seminar, we will investigate the history of fear, first by trying to define the term “Gothic,” and then by turning to four moments in the mode’s history: the British origins of the genre in the novels of Horace Walpole and Mary Shelly; the emergency of the classic horror story in the fiction of Edgar Allan Poe; the Gothic’s impact on lyric poetry and the sense of personal life in the writings of Emily Dickinson; the continuing presence of the genre in modern and contemporary fiction (Toni Morrison’s Beloved) and film (Psycho and the many more recent films inspired by Hitchcockian horror). Thomas Otten, Monday/Wednesday/Friday 1:00pm – 2:00pm.

CAS EN 220 – American Literature and World Cultures. “What is an American?” Ever since the earliest phases of settlement in the New World, writers have asked how cross-cultural encounter and exchange shaped a distinctively national literary tradition in the U.S.  This seminar will explore American literature in its global context, through close analysis of works about immigration, expatriation, and the confluence of European, African, and Asian cultures, from the early republic up through the Second World War.  Readings by Crevecoeur, Emerson, James, Stein, Sandburg, Fitzgerald, Hughes, Yamada, and others. Anita Patterson, Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00am – 11:00am.

CAS EN 327 – Topics in American Literature : South in History and Literature. Explores the experience and culture of the U.S. South by focusing on its history and literature to understand how and why the South continues to be seen as a unique component of the larger American experience. John T. Matthews, Monday/Wednesday 2:30pm – 4:00pm.

CAS EN 534 – American Literature: 1855-1918. American literature from the Civil War to WW1. Realism and naturalism: race, class, and urbanization: marriage and the new woman. Alger, Twain, James, Harper, Howells, Crane, Norris, Dreiser, Wharton, Dickinson, Frost. Gene Jarrett, Tuesday/Thursday 12:30pm – 2:00pm.

CAS EN 546 – The Modern American Novel. From 1900 to 1950. Works by Dreiser, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and others. Susan Mizruchi, Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00am – 11:00am.

CAS EN 547 – Contemporary American Fiction. Study of major American novels since 1984, by De Lillo, Morrison, O’Brien, Oates, Roth, as well as Chang-rae Lee’s “Native Speaker”, Kim Desai’s “The Inheritance of Loss”, and others. Course topics include risk, multiculturalism, trauma, and memory, postmodern spiritualities. Susan Mizruchi, Monday/Wednesday/Friday 11:00am – noon.

CAS EN 594 – Studies in Literature and the Arts: Dark Dreams: The Cinema of David Lynch. Intensive study of David Lynch’s films, informed by readings in literature and Freudian psychoanalysis. Topics include: the logic of dreams, forms of evil, the death drive, and small-town America. Weekly screenings. Leland Monk, Tuesday/Thursday 3:30pm – 6:00pm.

History

CAS HI 151 – The Emerging United States to 1865. Explores how the United States, at first only a series of borderland outposts, became a sprawling national republic. Investigates factors that brought Americans together and those that tore them apart, as they struggled passionately over racial, religious, and sectional values. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Jon H. Roberts, Wednesday 4:00pm – 5:00pm, or 5:00pm – 6:00pm.

CAS HI 152 – The United States since 1865. After the Civil War, Americans created a new urbanizing and industrializing landscape, flush with immigrants, growing class conflict, and racial divisions. This course explores how, through times of prosperity, depression, and war, Americans transformed the United States into one of the world’s leading nations. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Sarah Phillips, Tuesday/Thursday 9:30am – 11:00am.

CAS HI 286 – The American Military Experience. Investigates how the United States waged war during the twentieth century– and continues to wage war since 9/11. Why and how do Americans fight? Who serves and who sacrifices? With what consequences for American democracy? Also offered as CAS IR 320. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 370. Andrew Bacevich, Monday/Wednesday/Friday 9:00am – 10:00am.

CAS HI 292 – Capitalism in America: Economic History of the US. Surveys the history of corporations and private enterprise since the Civil War, disentangling the evolving relationships between business and government and tracing the influence of money, markets, and their managers in American communities from factories to the frontiers. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the title “Money, Markets & Managers: Economic History of the United States” that was previously numbered CAS HI 377. Louis Ferleger, Tuesday/Thursday 9:30am – 11:00am.

CAS HI 306 – American Thought and Culture, 1900 to the Present. Investigates how American thinkers brought about an intellectual revolution in three challenging moments: the naturalist revolt in pragmatic philosophy and modern art; progressive liberals’ confrontations with radicalism and new conservatisms; and poststructuralists’ uncertain leap beyond modernist science, religion, and humanities. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 374. Brooke Blower and Charles Capper, Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00am – 11:00am.

CAS HI 321 – The American Revolution, 1950-1800. Examines America’s dramatic war for independence, situating the colonies’ struggles within a series of broader challenges in the Atlantic world. Also shows how Americans struggled, often violently, to create a stable republic in the aftermath of these truly revolutionary upheavals. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 356. Brendan McConville, Tuesday/Thursday 11:00am – 12:30pm.

CAS HI 350 – Atlantic History. Examines the various interactions that shaped the Atlantic World, connecting Europe, Africa, and the Americas between 1400 and 1800. Begins by defining the political interaction, then emphasizes cultural exchange, religious conversion, and the revolutionary era. Also offered as CAS AA 385. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 385. John Thornton, Tuesday/Thursday 9:30am – 11:00am.

CAS HI 360 – European Dimensions of the Black Diaspora. Relates the Black experience in modern Europe to that in the Americas by exploring religion, art, folklore, and politics in such places as England, interwar France, Nazi Germany, and Soviet Russia. Explicates racism, for example in European soccer. Also offered as CAS AA 380. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course entitled “Blacks in Modern Europe” that was previously numbered CAS HI 380. Allison Blakely, Friday 10:00am – 1:00pm.

CAS HI 489 – The African Diaspora in the Americas. Topic for Spring 2010: African American History in Global and Comparative Perspective. African American history in an international framework. Examines development of racial categories in early transatlantic trade, Black participation in armed conflict, diverse Black communities in the twentieth century. Also offered as CAS AA 489. Linda Heywood, Monday 3:00pm – 6:00pm.

CAS HI 580 – The History of Racial Thought. Study of racial thinking and feeling in Europe and the United States since the fifteenth century. Racial thinking in the context of Western encounters with non-European people and Jews; its relation to social, economic, cultural, and political trends. Also offered as CAS AA 580. Ronald Richardson, Wednesday 2:00pm – 5:00pm.

History of Art & Architecture

CAS AH 284 – Arts in America. Survey of American painting, architecture, sculpture, prints, and photography from the early settlement in 1630 to the present. Deborah Stein, Tuesday/Thursday 12:30pm – 2:00pm.

CAS AH 295 – History of Photography. An introduction to the study of photographs. The history of the medium in Europe and America from its invention in 1839 to the present. After lectures on photographic theory and methodology, photographs are studied both as art objects and as historical artifacts. Kim D. Sichel, Tuesday/Thursday 11:00am – 12:30pm.

CAS AH 382 – Nineteenth-Century Architecture in Europe and America. Survey of European and American architecture from 1750 to 1910. Explores issues in architecture, landscape architecture and city planning, and examines style, technology, and architectural theory. Keith Morgan, Tuesday/Thursday 2:00pm – 3:30pm.

CAS AH 392 – Twentieth-Century Art from 1940 to 1980. Explores major currents in European and American art between 1940 and 1980. Examines the following movements and media in relation to key issues in postwar culture, politics and art criticism: Abstract Expressionism, Pop art, Minimalism, Conceptual art, Earthworks, body art, performance and video. Gregory Williams, Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00am – 11:00am.

CAS AH 541 – African American Art. Studies African American art and craft production from the early nineteenth century to the present against the background of the diaspora, reconstruction, and the modernist movements of the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Patricia Hills, Monday 9:00am – noon.

Sociology

CAS SO 207 – Sociology of Race and Ethnicity. Social definition of race and ethnicity. The adjustment of different ethnic groups and their impact upon U.S. social life. How prejudice and discrimination create class identities and how caste relations have affected patterns of integration during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Ruha Benjamin, Monday/Wednesday/Friday 11:00am – noon.

CAS SO 352 – American Masculinities. Considers the biological and social organization of masculinities; the ways culture reproduces/articulates masculinities, particularly with regard to race and class; how masculine identities are expressed; male privilege; alternative masculinities; and what is at stake in negotiating contemporary masculinities. Also offered as CAS WS 352. Barbara Gottfried, Tuesday/Thursday 2:00pm – 3:30pm.

CAS SO 408 – Ethnic, Race, and Minority Relations. Formation and position of ethnic minorities in the United States, including cross-group comparisons from England, Africa, and other parts of the world. Readings and field experience. Pre-req: At least two (2) pervious SO courses and Junior or Senior standing. Ruha Benjamin, Monday 1:00pm – 4:00pm.