Spring 2011 Courses

This schedule is subject to change.  For the most accurate information concerning other programs and departments, consult the University Class Schedule online: www.bu.edu/studentlink, as well as each department’s own website.  Graduate students may not take courses below the 500 level for credit.

American Studies

CAS AM 200 – Introduction to American Studies: An exploration of the multi-faceted themes of American society and culture in selected historical periods using a variety of approaches to interpret such topics as American art, literature, politics, material culture, and the mass media. Required of concentrators. Queen. TR 11:00am-12:30pm

CAS AM 250 – Arts and American Society: Policing the Boundaries of American Identity (Anti-Immigration Movements in U.S. History to 1930):  Examines how the trope of America as a “Nation of Immigrants” has challenged and affected political and social policy, with specific attention to the period of Second Wave immigration (1880-1925).  Themes addressed will include: Anti-Germanism, Anti-Catholicism, Development of Racial Hierarchies and Social Darwinism, Restriction of Asian Immigration, Eugenics and Public Health, and competing ideas of assimilation (Americanization vs. Cultural Pluralism vs. Cosmopolitanism).  The course will also trace shifting ideas regarding the dominant definitions of American indentity, and how these definitions affected the daily lives of, and were challenged by, different immigrant groups.  Carries Writing Program credit for CAS WR 150. Schneider. MWF 10:00am-11:00am

CAS AM 502 – Special Topics in American Studies: American Landscapes: This course uses the idea of landscape as an interdisciplinary lens to survey American culture. We will examine the physical and metaphorical landscape of America across time. In this course, we will explore how we have shared the landscape, used it to define ourselves as a nation, and asked it to serve as a resource, a religion, a symbol, and setting. Sewell. W 1:00pm-4:00pm

CAS AM 502 - Special Topics in American Studies: Building Archaeology: New Approaches to the Study of Early American Architecture. New research and rigorous methods challenge long-held assumptions and uncover intriguing histories and meanings of early American buildings and landscapes. Dempsey. R 1:00pm-4:00pm

African American Studies

CAS AA 103 – Introduction to African American Literature. Examines political, cultural, and historical roots of the African American experience through readings in African American literature.  Boelcskevy. TR 9:30am-11am.

CAS AA 304 – Introduction to African American Women Writers. Surveys the writings of African American women writers from slavery to the present and explores the African American female literary tradition in the context of black history and culture. Boelcskevy. TR 12:30pm-2pm.

CAS AA 363 – Race and the Development of the American Economy: A Global Perspective. Surveys the economic history of African Americans within the context of the development of the American and global economies. Topics include the economics of slavery; race and industrialization; the Great Migration; anti-discrimination legislation; and the historical origins of contemporary racial inequalities. Prereq: (CASEC101) or consent of instructor. Margo. TR 2pm-3:30pm.

CAS AA 385 – Atlantic History. Examines the various interactions that shaped the Atlantic World, connecting Europe, Africa, and the Americas between 1400 and 1800. Begins by defining the political interaction, then emphasizes cultural exchange, religious conversion, and the revolutionary era. Thornton. MWF 9am-10am.

CAS AA 408 – Seminar: Ethnic, Race, and Minority Relations. Formation and position of ethnic minorities in the United States, including cross-group comparisons from England, Africa, and other parts of the world. Readings and field experience. Prereq: (CASAA207 OR CASSO207) or consent of instructor. Benjamin. TR 9:30am-11am.

CAS AA 502 – Topics in African American Literature. Topic for Spring 2011: Twentieth-Century African American Novel. Major works from the Harlem Renaissance, Realism, Modernism, the Black Arts Movement, and the contemporary period. Authors include Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, Wallace Thurman, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, John Wideman, and Toni Morrison. Boelcskevy W 2pm-5pm.

CAS AA 564 – From Slavery to Freedom: Abolition in Comparative Perspective. How did legalized slavery, a world-wide practice for thousands of years, end? The process of abolition in the Americas, Africa, and elsewhere is examined and compared to the later regulation of forced labor and to contemporary slavery. Crawford. M 11-2.

CAS AA 571 – African American Art. Studies African American art and craft production from the early nineteenth century to the present against the background of the diaspora, reconstruction, and the modernist movements of the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prereq: junior standing. Hills. M 1-4.

CAS AA 580 – The History of Racial Thought. Study of racial thinking and feeling in Europe and the United States since the fifteenth century. Racial thinking in the context of Western encounters with non-European people and Jews; its relation to social, economic, cultural, and political trends. Richardson. W 10-1.

Anthropology

CAS AN 250 – Understanding Folklore and Folklife. The ways individuals, families, and communities express themselves, their beliefs, and their values within their own culture. Emphasis on meaning carried by oral literature, folk arts and crafts, social customs and festivals, and family folklore. Ferraiuolo. TR 3:30-5.

CAS AN 308 – Food, Culture, and Society. Study of foodways, culinary social history, and diet and food ecology with special attention to Asian societies and Boston’s food culture. Examines the use of food and cuisine as a focus for identity, national development, and social change. White. MWF 3-4.

CAS AN 397 – Anthropological Film and Photography. Considers the history and development of anthropological, ethnographic, and transcultural filmmaking. In-depth examination of important anthropological films in terms of methodologies, techniques, and strategies of expression; story, editing, narration, themes, style, content, art, and aesthetics.  Safizadeh. W 4-7.

 

 

History of Art and Architecture

CAS AH 201 – Understanding Architecture: Theoretical Approaches to the Built Environment. Introduces a range of approaches to the analysis of architecture. Learn how scholars and architects have interpreted meaning in architecture through the rubrics of art, structure, language, nonverbal communication, experience, and culture. Sewell. TR 12:30-2

 

CAS AH 208 – Art and Politics. History and theory of the relationship between visual culture and the major social and political forces from the American and French revolutions to the present. Selected topics in the areas of painting, sculpture, photography, prints, and the popular arts. Hills. TR 12:30-2.

 

CAS AH 295 – History of Photography. An introduction to the study of photographs. The history of the medium in Europe and America from its invention in 1839 to the present. After lectures on photographic theory and methodology, photographs are studied both as art objects and as historical artifacts. Ditner. TR 11-12:30.

 

CAS AH 392 – Twentieth-Century Art from 1940 to 1980. An exploration of the major currents in European and American art between 1940 and 1980. Examines abstract expressionism, pop art, minimalism, earthworks, and conceptual art in relation to major issues in postwar culture, politics, and art criticism. Williams. MWF 2-3.

 

CAS AH 398 – Twentieth-Century Architecture. An introduction to the major developments in architecture and urban planning from ca. 1900 to the present. Traces the history of modern architecture in key projects, taking account of formal, technological, and ideological factors, as well as social, cultural, and environmental contexts. Scrivano. TR 3:30-5.

 

CAS AH 580 – Architectural Technology and Materials. An introduction to the history of architectural construction, technologies, and materials, and their consequences in the built environment. Students receive a practical understanding of the building process and of its social and cultural contexts. Brown. F 9-12.

CAS AH 571 – African American Art. Studies African American art and craft production from the early nineteenth century to the present against the background of the diaspora, reconstruction, and the modernist movements of the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Hills. M 1-4.

 

COM

COM FT 303 – History of Television. In this course we will examine the ways in which industrial factors and communication policies have shaped the medium that sits in 99% of U.S. homes. We will begin by examining television’s roots in radio. The remainder of the course will be broken down into three stages of television history advanced by Rogers, Epstein and Reeves (2002). The first category is TVI- the period of three-network dominance. The next stage, TVII, is characterized by the rise of cable television and the decentering of the three networks. We will conclude the course by considering the current stage of television- TV III- in which the era of “on demand” has further destabilized traditional notions of content, audiences, producers, scheduling and technologies. In addition to tracing this development historically and thematically, we will confront it critically, analyzing the connections between power and money in the medium of television. Jaramillo. W 1-4.

COM FT 306 – History of Cinema. This course is designed to introduce students to the multi-faceted terrain of film history encompassing industry, aesthetics, filmmakers, society, culture and politics. Through lecture, discussion and screenings, students will encounter defining moments in the U.S. and international cinema. Most of the course will take a chronological approach, introducing students to film in its infancy and moving through its maturation in various nations. The final weeks of the course will offer the students case studies in cinema- an approach that offers them a glimpse of what they can look forward to in upper level film studies courses. Jaramillo. M 1-4.

COM FT 524 – Golden Age of Television. Course examines the extraordinary explosion of talent and creativity in live television’s early days. It covers writers such as Paddy Chayefsky and Rod Serling, personalities like Edward R. Morrow, entertainers Sic Caesar, Milton Berle and Lucille Ball, live political broadcasts such as the Army-McCarthy hearings, and most significantly, the great anthology series like Philco Television Playhouse, Studio One, U.S. Steel Hour, Playhouse 90 which presented great and original American teleplays “Marty,” “Requiem for a Heavyweight,” “Patterns,” “The Comedian,” “The Defenders” and many more. Also covered are the great directors John Frankenheimer, Alfred Hitchcock, Delbert Mann and stars like Paul Newman, Ed Begley, James Dean all of whom began their careers in this television era. Loman. TR 11-12:30.

COM FT 554 – Special Topics in Film and Television.

English

CAS EN 533 – American Literature: Beginnings to 1855. American literature from the beginning to the brink of the Civil War. Puritan origins, print culture, American poetic taste, entertainment, and the debate over slavery. Works by Bradstreet, Jefferson, Franklin, Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Stowe, Jacobs, and Melville. Korobkin. TR 2-3:30.

CAS EN 534 – American Literature: 1855 to 1918. American literature from the Civil War to WWI. Realism and naturalism; race, class, and urbanization; marriage and the new woman. Alger, Twain, James, Harper, Howells, Crane, Norris, Dreiser, Wharton, Dickinson, Frost. Korobkin. TR 11-12:30.

CAS EN 536 – Twentieth-Century American Poetry. Study of five or six poets from the following: Pound, Eliot, Stevens, Williams, Moore, Frost, Lowell, Bishop, Berryman, Ammons, Ashbery, Plath, Ginsberg, Merrill. Costello. MWF 11-12.

CAS EN 545 A1 – The Nineteenth Century American Novel. Development of prose fiction in the United States, with works by Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Stowe, James, Howells, and others. Topics include print culture, realism and romance, the Civil War, and sentimentalism. Howell. TR 9:30-11.

CAS EN 545 B1 – The Nineteenth Century American Novel. Development of prose fiction in the United States, with works by Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Stowe, James, Howells, and others. Topics include print culture, realism and romance, the Civil War, and sentimentalism. Lee. TR 12:30-2.

CAS EN 546 – The Modern American Novel. From 1900 to 1950. Works by Dreiser, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and others. Van Anglen. TR 3:30-5.

CAS EN 547 – Contemporary American. Syllabus varies from semester to semester but this course may be taken only once for credit. Two topics are offered 2010/2011. Fall 2010: Postwar Truth, Postwar Fiction. A study of both fiction and essays by three post-WWII writers: Ralph Ellison, Don DeLillo, and David Foster Wallace. Topics include comedy, irony, media culture, and the relationship between fiction and non-fiction. Spring 2011: Study of major American novels since 1984, by De Lillo, Morrison, O’Brien, Oates, Roth, and others. Course topics include risk, multiculturalism, trauma and memory, postmodern spiritualities. Mizruchi. TR 2-3:30.

History

CAS HI 152 – The United States Since 1865. Reconstruction, industrialism, and recent social movements; labor and populism, imperial expansion and progressive politics, World War I, 1920s prosperity and the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, and the Cold War. Paul Schmitz. TR 3:30-5.

CAS HI 365 – United States Since 1968. Recent political, economic, social, and cultural history. Includes Nixon, Carter, and Reagan presidencies; stagflation; Watergate; “Me Decade”; end of the Cold War. Bruce Schulman. TR 12:30-2.

CAS HI 367 – Americans in the World: United States History in Transnational Perspective. Examines how political, cultural, and social movements in the United States have connected with people and developments around the world. Topics include views of American society by outside observers, Americans’ activities abroad, and their part in shaping global integration. Brooke Blower. TR 2-3:30.

CAS HI 369 – Science and Christianity in Europe and North America Since 1500. Examines the relationship between science and the Christian tradition in Europe and North America since 1500. Considers the epistemological and metaphysical foundations of both science and Christian thought as they have evolved over time. Jon Roberts. MWF 11-12.

CAS HI 370 – The American Military Experience. Introduction to American military history from the colonial period to the role of military force in contemporary U.S. statecraft. Examines the character of the armed services, the American style of waging war, and the relationship between the military and society. Andrew Bacevich. MWF 9-10.

CAS HI 374 – American Thought and Culture, 1900 to the Present. Major thinkers and movements in intellectual and cultural history since 1900. Topics include pragmatism and progressivism; ethnic and cultural pluralism; Marxism and liberalism; Cold War ideology and neoconservatism; artistic modernism; psychoanalysis and modernization theory; the New Left, multiculturalism, and postmodernism. Charles Capper. MWF 10-11.

CAS HI 375 – A History of Women in the United States. This course examines the ideas and experiences of women in the United States from the 1600s through the late twentieth century. The course considers the common factors that shaped women’s lives as well as women’s diverse class, ethnic, and regional experiences. Nina Silber. TR 9:30-11.

CAS HI 385 – History of the Atlantic World, 1500-1825. Examines the various interactions that shaped the Atlantic World, connecting Europe, Africa, and the Americas between 1500 and 1800. After defining the political interaction, there is special emphasis on cultural exchange, religious conversion, and the revolutionary era. John Thornton. MWF 9-10.

CAS HI 393 – Americans and the Middle East. Examines the intersecting histories of America and the Middle East from the late eighteenth century to the present, focusing first on American missionary and educational efforts in the region and then on American political and military involvement after World War II. Betty Anderson. MWF 11-12.

CAS HI 455 – Early American History and Culture. Selected topics in the social and cultural history of America during the colonial and revolutionary eras. Emphasis on the exploration and colonization of New England and the transition from a pre-industrial to an industrializing society. Brendan McConville. T 12:30-3:30.

CAS HI 461 – The Civil War in American Memory. This class is a research colloquium in American history, examining the ways in which Americans have thought about the experiences of the Civil War, from the immediate postwar period through the later years of the twentieth century. Nina Silber. R 12:30-3:30.

CAS HI 465 – The United States and the Cold War. Examination of U.S. Cold War foreign policy from its origins at the end of World War II to the collapse of the Berlin Wall and of the Soviet Union. William Keylor. W 1-4.

CAS HI 476 – Technology in American Society. Technology and American society from the colonial era to World War II. Topics include industrialization, scientific management, household technologies, and the auto age. Louis Ferleger. T 12:30-3:30.

CAS HI 537 – World War II: Causes, Course, Consequences. Begins with the origins of World War II in Asia and Europe, follows its major campaigns, and ends with its main consequences. Topics include diplomacy, grand strategy, command decisions, conditions of battle, and civilians in occupation and resistance. Cathal Nolan. W 9-12.

CAS HI 575 – The Birth of Modern America, 1896-1929. The political, economic, social, and cultural history of the United States in the formative years of the early twentieth century. Topics include Progressivism, World War I, immigration, modernism, the Scopes Trial, suffrage, the Harlem Renaissance, and the emergence of modern business practices. Paul Schmitz. W 9-12.

CAS HI 580 – The History of Racial Thought. Study of racial thinking and feeling in Europe and the United States since the fifteenth century. Racial thinking in the context of Western encounters with non-European people and Jews; its relation to social, economic, cultural, and political trends. Ronald Richardson. W 10-1.

 

Political Science

CAS PO 211 – Introduction to American Politics. Study of the national political structure; emphasis on Congress, the executive, administrative agencies, and the judiciary. Relations between formal institutions, parties, and interest groups. Reeves. MWF 12-1.

CAS PO 241 – Introduction to Public Policy. Analysis of several issue areas: civil rights, school desegregation, welfare and social policy, education and urban housing, energy and the environment. Characteristics of policy systems in each issue area are analyzed to identify factors which may affect the content and implementation of public policies. Rossell. TR 11-12:30.

CAS PO 302 – Campaigns and Elections Around the World. Electoral campaigns in Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Changes in campaigns over time; role of international political consultants; influence of party systems, electoral systems, campaign finance regulation, vote buying, and mass media; campaign effects on voting behavior and public opinion. Prereq: (CASPO251) or consent of instructor. Boas. MW 12:30-2.

CAS PO 324 – Media and Politics in the United States. Examines changes over time in the American polity’s assumptions about what the press ought to do. In particular, relates our understanding of the press’s role to contemporary media developments including technological changes, corporate media ownership, and the re-amateurization of journalism.   Prereq: (CASPO211) or consent of instructor. Christenson. TR 9:30-11.

CAS PO 352 – North-South Relations. Employs a multidisciplinary approach to analyze the relations between the industrialized nations of the “North” and the developing nations of the “South.” Addresses historical and current issues in North-South relations, including trade, investment, migration, regional economic integration, and the environment. Helwege. TR 11-12:30.

CAS PO 518 – American Politics and Use of Force. Examines how domestic politics drive the use of force in the postwar United States. Explores how Congress, courts, interest groups, media, and public opinion define Presidential action in times of crisis, as well as the kinds of crises that evoke action.   Prereq: (CASPO211) and junior standing, or consent of instructor. Crawford. M 11-2.

CAS PO 544 – Interest Groups, Public Opinion, and the Policy Process. Focuses on public opinion and interest group activities as they affect the policy-making process in the United States. Attention is paid to the role of the media, of lobbying, of litigation, and of the electoral process. Prereq: (CASPO211) or consent of instructor. Wilson. W 9-12.

CAS PO 564 – From Slavery to Freedom: Abolition in Comparative Perspective. How did legalized slavery, a world-wide practice for thousands of years, end? The process of abolition in the Americas, Africa, and elsewhere is examined and compared to the later regulation of forced labor and to contemporary slavery. Crawford. M 11-2.

CAS PO 570 – U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle. Examines the historical development and present status of the United States’ association with the Middle East: American commercial, economic, political, military, and humanitarian interests in the area and their interaction. Prereq: senior standing. Norton. M 1-4.

CAS PO 610 – Research Seminar in American Politics. Concepts and methods of research, writing, and analysis in the social sciences. Prepares students for post-graduate work, and includes a semester-long research project on a topic of individual interest in American politics, subject to instructor’s approval. Prereq: (CASPO211) Christenson. T 2-5.

Religion

CAS RN 111 – Multireligious America. Introduction to American religions, including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism, with an emphasis on developments after 1965, when new legislation opened up immigration and dramatically altered the American religious landscape. Exploration of interreligious interactions: conflict, cooperation, and creolization.  Prothero. TR 2-3:30.

Sociology

CAS SO 207 – Introduction to Ethnic, Race, and Minority Relations. Social definition of race and ethnicity. The adjustment of different ethnic groups and their impact upon U.S. social life. How prejudice and discrimination create class identities and how caste relations have affected patterns of integration during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Stone. MWF 2-3.

CAS SO 215 – Health and Society. Social, cultural, and intercultural factors in health and illness. Training and socialization of medical professionals, roots of medical power and authority, organization and operation of health care facilities. U.S. healthcare system and its main problems. Comparison of health care systems in the U.S. and in other countries.  Guseva. TR 11-12:30.

CAS SO 225 – Law and Society. The development of law as an institution of social regulation. Analysis of law and order as pursued in enforcement agencies and courts. The education of lawyers and the ethics of legal practice. Student observations in local criminal courts. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS SO 115. Yeager. TR 9:30-11.

CAS SO 462 – Seminar: Great Theorists. Examines works of major classical theorists and addresses issues in sociological theory generally. The theorists’ confrontation with modern capitalism and modernity in general is explored, as are their postures with respect to reform and revolution. Focus on Durkheim and Weber. Kalberg. W 9-12.