Fall 2011 Courses

CAS AM 301 Perspectives on the American Experience. Topic for Fall 2011: American Spectacle: Melodramatic Theatre & Early Silent Film.  Covering the years 1865 to 1920, this course examines how theater and film—two of the most popular forms of turn-of-the-twentieth-century American entertainment— frequently exchanged features with one another.  Known largely in popular culture for its cliffhanger climaxes and damsels in distress, sensation melodrama will be the focal point of our theater studies.  Our films will range from early voyeuristic sketches (execution reenactments, boxing shorts) to E.S. Porter’s and D.W. Griffith’s shorts (train-robbery spectacles, racing-horse melodramas) to full-length films engaging controversial social issues (empowered-women serials, white-slavery and drug- scare movies, urban-danger pictures).  Screenings will take place both in and outside of class.  Selected plays include Boucicault’s After Dark, Daly’s Under the Gaslight, and Belasco’s A Girl of the Golden West; films include The Great Train Robbery, A Drunkard’s Reformation, The Whip, A Traffic in Souls, The Perils of Pauline, and Orphans of the Storm.  D’Alessandro T Th 9:30-11:00

CAS AM 363 Surfing and American Culture. The history of the sport of surfing , tracing the cultural, technological, and economic aspects of its transformation from a Polynesian folkway to a global multi-billion dollar economic force.  Thematic emphasis on questions of American diversity and identity.  Moore MWF 11-12

CAS AM 546 Historic Preservation. An introduction to the American preservation movement, including current issues and modern practice. Considers key aspects of the history, theory, and philosophy of historic preservation, and introduces students to key figures in preservation agencies and organizations in this region. Dempsey T 5:30pm-8:30pm

African American Studies

AA 103 Introduction to African American Literature.  Examines political, cultural, and historical roots of the African American experience through readings in African American literature.  Boelcskevy T TH 9:30- 11:00

AA 207 Introduction to Ethnic, Race and Minority Relations. Social definition of race and ethnicity. The adjustment of different ethnic groups and their impact upon U.S. social life. How prejudice and discrimination create class identities and how caste relations have affected patterns of integration during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Also offered as CAS SO 207. Benjamin T TH 2-3

AA 304 Introduction to African American Women Writers. Surveys the writings of African American women writers from slavery to the present and explores the African American female literary tradition in the context of black history and culture. Boelcskevy T TH 12:30-2

AA355 Science, Race, and Society. Explores social, cultural, and political debates surrounding scientific authority. Focuses on how racial differences come to be understood as ‘natural’ and how scientific processes and social orders impact one another. Also considers how gender, class, and nationality have shaped scientific understandings of racialized bodies and populations. Benjamin T 9:30-12:30pm

AA 371 African American History. The history of African Americans from African origins to present time; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time. Heywood MWF 11-12

AA 388 Black Radical Thought. Black radical thought in America, Europe, and Africa since the eighteenth century through writings of abolitionists, leaders of revolutions and liberation movements, Black nationalists, and Black socialists. Emphasizes the global nature of the “Black World” and its role in world history. Blakely T TH 11-12:30

AA 504 African American and Asian American Women Writers. Cross-cultural comparison of African American and Asian American women writers. Explores and evaluates the cultural impact of their work, and looks at how these two groups bound together by “otherness” pursue the theme of conflicting cultures. Boelcskevy W 12-3

AA 514 Comparative Slavery. The institution of slavery in history with a special focus on slavery and the slave trade in Africa and the Americas in the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Attention to cultural and political issues as well as economic and social aspects of slavery. Thornton TH 2-5

AA 559 Reckoning with the Past: Reparations and Justice in Comparative Perspective. The debate about reparations for slavery and Jim Crow segregation in the United States examined critically as conversation about, and movement for, retrospective justice. Includes discussion of war crimes, tribunals, and truth commissions. Crawford T 11-2

AA 590 The World and the West Explores relations between the West and the Third World from 1850, focusing on national and cultural movements in the Third World, and places the African American struggle for freedom in the United States in global and comparative perspective. Richardson T TH 12:30-2

Anthropology

AN 310 Studies in North American Ethnography A survey including an appreciation of the traditional background and heritage of native North Americans, and analysis of the history and contact with Europeans and governmental policies, and an examination and evaluation of the contemporary situation. Shipton MWF 9-10

History of Art and Architecture

AH 201 Understanding Architecture: Theoretical Approaches to the Built Environment. Introduces a range of approaches to the analysis of architecture.  Learn how scholars and architects have interpreted meaning in architecture through the rubrics of art, structure, language, nonverbal communication, experience, and culture.   Morgan T TH 9:30-11

AH 386 Twentieth-Century American Painting. Realist and avant-garde movements of the twentieth century, including New York dada, early abstraction, regionalism, art and politics during the depression years, abstract expressionism, pop art and minimal art, performance art, feminist art, and recent developments in postmodernism.  Hills T TH 12:30-2

AH 393 Contemporary Art: 1980 to Now. Explores the terms of debate, key figures, and primary sites for the production and reception of contemporary art on a global scale since 1980.  Painting, installation art, new media, performance, art criticism, and curatorial practice are discussed. Williams T TH 3:30-5:00

AH 398 Twetieth Century Architecture. An introduction to the major deveolpments in architecture and urban planning from ca. 1900 to the present.  Traces the history of modern architecture in key projects, taking account of formal, technological, and ideological factors, as well as social, cultural, and environmental contexts.  Scrivano T TH 2-3:30

AH497 Seminar in Contemporary Art: Art Criticism Since 1945. Tracks the changing fortunes of the art critic in the United States and Europe from World War II to the present.  Begins with the peak years of critical influence helt at mid-century by figures such as Clement Greenberg.  Examines key themes since the 1960′s: the artist-critic, the crisis of criticism, the impact of theory, the art market, and digital technology.  Includes a practical component: students write short reviews of local exhibitions before producing a final research praper. Williams TH 10-1

AH 520 The Museum and Historical Agency. The history, present realities, and future possibilities of museums and historical agencies.  Emphasis on the collection, preservation, and use of objects, as well as on the interaction of artists, dealers, collectors, donors, scholars, trustees, and museum professionals.  Hall T 2-5

AH 583 English Country House and America’s Cottages. This course explores the development of the ‘English country house’ in terms of its architecture, interior decoration and furnishings, and landscape setting, and the cultures and lifestyles associated with it both when the house was built, or significantly altered, and today. The country house has been described as England’s greatest contribution to the Western cultural heritage. Influenced by the arts of other countries, in turn the country house has exerted an influence abroad, notably in America. In turn, American heiresses helped to modernize country houses by the end of the nineteenth century. In the twentieth century, an “English country house: style emerged in New England. We will also consider how such houses are preserved today. While we cannot visit the England’s houses during class, we can find examples of their style and collections at the MFA and elsewhere. Hall TH 2-5

AH 584 Greater Boston: Architecture and Planning. Examines the buildings, development patterns, and open space planning of greater Boston, with particular emphasis on the nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.  Weekly visits to neighborhoods and buildings throughout the city are combined with independent research projects for each member of the seminar. Morgan W 1-4

Archaeology

AR 480 Archaeological Ethics and the Law.  Ethical and legal issues for archaeologists. Topics include archaeology as a public interest; legal organization of archaeology; international approaches to heritage management; looting, collecting, and the antiquities market; maritime law and underwater archaeology; and cultural resource management in the United States.   Berlin M 1-4

Communications: Film and Television

COM FT 524 Golden Age of Television. Examines the extraordinary explosion of talent and creativity in live television’s early days. It covers writers such as Paddy Chayefsky and Rod Serling, personalities like Edward R. Morrow, entertainers Sic Caesar, Milton Berle and Lucille Ball, live political broadcasts such as the Army-McCarthy hearings, and most significantly, the great anthology series like Philco Television Playhouse, Studio One, U.S. Steel Hour, Playhouse 90 which presented great and original American teleplays “Marty,” “Requiem for a Heavyweight,” “Patterns,” “The Comedian,” “The Defenders” and many more. Also covered are the great directors John Frankenheimer, Alfred Hitchcock, Delbert Mann and stars like Paul Newman, Ed Begley, James Dean all of whom began their careers in this television era. Loman M 4-7

English

CAS EN 127 Readings in American Literature. Selected American writers from the Colonial period to the present. Prose and poetry representative of the American tradition. Primarily for students not concentrating in English. TBA  MWF 12-1 or Deschere TTH 2-3:30

CAS EN 128 Representing Boston. The literary and cultural geography of the city of Boston, from Puritan sermons to modern crime fiction. Readings by Winthrop, Wheatley, Hawthorne, Alcott, King, Malcolm X, Lowell, and Lehane; required fieldwork in graveyards, war memorials, the MFA, and Fenway Park. Howell TTH 11-12:30

CAS EN 175 Literature and the Art of Film. Survey and analysis of cinema as an expressive medium from the silent period to the present. Films are screened weekly and discussed in conjunction with works of literature. Students must register for screening, discussion, and lecture. Monk TH 2-3:30 Optional Film Showing: MT 7-9:30; F 2-4:30

CAS EN 327 Topics in American Literature: The South in History and Literature. Why have so many great American writers been from the South, or been preoccupied with it?  Toni Morrison’s most famous novel, Beloved, struggles with the emotional consequences of centuries of Southern slaveholding, while Zora Neale Hurston wonders what it would be like to declare independence from the very idea of race in Their Eyes Were Watching God.  Mark Twain’s Missouri provides the setting for the nation’s long-classic yet highly controversial coming-of-age novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.  William Faulkner’s experience with his own family’s obsession with Southern guilt and grandeur provoked him to observe wryly that the past is not dead, it isn’t even past.  Then-presidential candidate Barack Obama quoted Faulkner’s words in his major speech on race during the 2008 campaign to point out how the nation’s historical racism and eventual commitment to civil rights must be kept in mind, not forgotten.  From the gothic horror tales of Edgar Allan Poe to the comically grotesque stories of Flannery O’Connor, from romances of the Old South like Gone With the Wind to stories by Asian immigrants re-inventing a New South today, from tales of European ‘settlers’ describing the frontier to those of native Americans re-imagining the land before it was taken from them, Southern literature offers a wealth of brilliant writing about some of the deepest problems the US has faced through its history.  This course will consider a representative selection of Southern writers in the context of major events in Southern, national, and global history. We’ll try to get at broader questions of Southern culture by thinking about how literature shapes and interprets events, and how historical problems engage the artistic imagination. (Taught with HI 331.) Matthews, Silber TTH 12:30-2`

CAS EN 533 American Literature: Beginnings to 1855. American literature from the beginning to the brink of the Civil War. Puritan origins, print culture, American poetic taste, entertainment, and the debate over slavery. Works by Bradstreet, Jefferson, Franklin, Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Stowe, Jacobs, and Melville. Korobkin MWF 12-1

CAS EN 545 The Nineteenth Century American Novel. Development of prose fiction in the United States, with works by Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Stowe, James, Howells, and others. Topics include print culture, realism and romance, the Civil War, and sentimentalism.  Van Anglen TTH 2-3:30

CAS EN 546 The Modern American Novel. From 1900 to 1950. Works by Dreiser, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and others. Mizruchi TTH 12:30-2

History

CAS HI 151 The Emerging United States to 1865. Colonial society and the roots of the American Revolution; federalism, nationalism, Jeffersonian democracy; Jackson and democratic capitalism; expansion and imperialism; slavery and civil war. Roberts. MWF 11-12

CAS HI 287  History of American Foreign Relations Since 1898. Analysis of the history of American foreign policy from the perspective of the changing world and regional international systems; emphasis on the effect of these systems and the impact of America on the creation and operation of international systems. Mayers. MWF 1-2

CAS HI 291 Politics of the American Environment. Examines how questions of natural resource distribution, environmental rights, and environmental hazards have shaped United States politics and governance, with a focus on the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Phillips. MWF 10-11

CAS HI 292 Economic History of the United States. Analysis of American economic development; role of factory and frontier; changes in economic structure and institutions; parts played by government and business enterprise in development. Influence of economic conditions and occupation groupings on political alignments and on public policy. Ferleger MWF 9-10

CAS HI 298 African American History. The history of African-Americans from African origins to present time; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time. Heywood. MWF 10-11

CAS HI 300 American Popular Culture. Examines Americans’ beliefs and the cultural forms used to convey their experiences since the late nineteenth century. Includes challenges to the Victorian order, growth of commercial entertainments, new rules and reactions to modern life, and changing understandings of the self. Blower MWF 10-11

CAS HI 301 A History of Women in the United States. This course examines the ideas and experiences of women in the United States from the 1600s through the late twentieth century. The course considers the common factors that shaped women’s lives as well as women’s diverse class, ethnic, and regional experiences. Silber TR 9:30-11

CAS HI 302 Science and American Culture. From the colonial period to the present. Such topics as the American reception of Copernicus and Newton, scientific exploration, the interaction of science and religion, the impact of science on social theory, the rise of “big science,” and contemporary “science wars.” Roberts MWF 2-3

CAS HI 311  The South in History and Literature. Team-taught course. Explores the experience and culture of the U.S. South by focusing on its history and literature to understand how and why the South continues to be seen as a unique component of the larger American experience. Silber TR 12:30-2

CAS HI 328 The Civil War Era. Social, economic, and political consequences of slavery; Southern secession and the Civil War; political reconstruction; the New South; and the betrayal of black rights Brownell TR 2-3:30

CAS HI  329 The Gilded Age. Known as a period of obscene ostentation, this period also reveals considerable tension between a society seething with social conflict and a culture creeping toward nationalization. Emphasis on social conflict, regional differences, and new cultural pursuits. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 362. Ferleger MWF 11-12

CAS HI 436 The Great War and the Fragile Peace Exploration of the military, political, social, economic, and cultural consequences of the First World War and the peace conference of 1919. Focuses on technological innovations, the expanded role of the state, and the long-range impact of the Versailles settlement. Also offered as CAS IR 436. Keylor W 1-4pm

CAS HI 454 War and American Society, 1607-1973. Examines the American experience with war between the time of the initial European settlement in the seventeenth century and the end of the Vietnam war. Attention to theoretical and institutional change as well as events. McConville M 12-3

CAS HI 467 Postwar America: Issues in Political, Cultural, and Social History, 1945-69. Topics include Cold War, McCarthyism, fifties ideology, War on Poverty, civil rights movement, Vietnam, New Left, counterculture, rise and decline of liberalism. Brownell W 3-6

CAS HI 566. Ideas and American Foreign Policy. Examines the intellectual foundations of U.S. foreign policy from the founding of the republic to the present. Bacevich TR 9:30-11

CAS HI 568 The Modern Metropolis: Approaches to Urban History. Examines the development of the modern American metropolis during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Considers transformations in commercial life, popular entertainments, and the use of public spaces as well as social encounters across lines of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Blower M 12-3

CAS HI 590 The World and the West. This course explores relations between the West and the Third World from 1850, focusing on national and cultural movements in the Third World. It places the African American struggle for freedom in the United States in global and comparative perspective. Richardson TR 12:30-2

International Relations

CAS IR 318 Religion and American Foreign Policy Introduction to the historical roots and contemporary relevance of religion for American foreign policy. Uses conventional chronological approaches to explore key themes that illustrate the role of religion as input and object of American foreign policy. ProdromouMWF 11-12

Political Science

CAS PO 211 Introduction to American Politics. Study of the national political structure; emphasis on Congress, the executive, administrative agencies, and the judiciary. Relations between formal institutions, parties, and interest groups.  Reeves TTH 3:30-5

CAS PO 300 Topics in American Politics. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. Topics vary. Possible offerings include American Congress, Voting Behaviors, Separation of Powers, Use of Force, Race and Politics. TBA TTh 2-3:30

CAS PO 309 America at War: The Response to 9/11. Investigates America’s wars against terrorism, focusing on Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan, from 9/11 to the present. Traces the decisions that led to the wars, the military strategies employed, and the political ramifications of these conflicts in the U.S. and abroad.  Kriner MW 12-1:30 Meets 7-8:30pm on select Mondays.

CAS PO 343 Foundations of American Foreign Policy. Investigates the social and political roots of U.S. policy solutions. Cross-national comparisons and historical perspectives are used to shed light on seemingly unique American solutions to pressing social and economic problems. Martin TTh 11-12:30

CAS PO 366 History of American Foreign Relations since 1898. Analysis of the history of American foreign policy from the perspective of the changing world and regional international systems; emphasis on the effect of these systems and the impact of America on the creation and operation of international systems.  Mayers MWF 1-2

CAS PO 513 Development of American Constitutional Law. A survey of the development of constitutional law and the exercise of power by the U.S. Supreme Court. The course is drawn entirely from decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court and the principal theme is the development of national constitutions and power.  Silverstein TTH 9:30-11

CAS PO 559  Reckoning with the Past: Reparations and Justices in Comparative Perspective. The debate about reparations for slavery and Jim Crow segregation in the United States examined critically as conversation about, and movement for, retrospective justice. Includes discussion of war crimes tribunals and truth commissions. Crawford T 11-2

Religion

CAS RN 122  Religion in America II.  A survey of the history of religion in the United States from the Civil War to the present, focusing on a series of religious controversies that highlight the pluralistic and conflictive nature of American religious history.   Prothero MWF 11-12

CAS RN 318 Religion and American Foreign Policy.   Introduction to the historical roots and contemporary relevance of religion for American foreign policy. Uses conventional chronological approaches to explore key themes that illustrate the role of religion as input and object of American foreign policy. Prodromou MWF 11-12

CAS RN 330 American Jewish Experiences. Examines history, culture, politics, and identities of American Jews and Judaism, 1654-2010. Communal documents, family histories, liturgy, sermons, music, films, literature, art, and artifacts are employed to study similarities and differences with other Jewish communities and other American minorities.  Levine TTH 9:30-11

Sociology

CAS SO 205 The American Family. Nature of the American family and its ethnic and class variants. Social changes affecting courtship, mate selection, sexual behavior, reproduction, marital stability, and divorce through the life cycle. Social policies affecting family life. Interrelations of family with economy, state, religion, and other institutions.  Connell MWF 1-2

CAS SO 207 Introduction to Ethnic, Race, and Minority Relations.   Social definition of race and ethnicity. The adjustment of different ethnic groups and their impact upon U.S. social life. How prejudice and discrimination create class identities and how caste relations have affected patterns of integration during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  Benjamin TTH 2-3:30

CAS SO 215 Sociology of Health Care. Social, cultural, and intercultural factors in health and illness. Training and socialization of medical professionals, roots of medical power and authority, organization and operation of health care facilities. U.S. healthcare system and its main problems. Comparison of health care systems in the U.S. and in other countries. Guseva TTH 9:30-11:00

CAS SO 240 Sexuality and Social Life. Introduction to sociological perspectives on sexuality. Historical and comparative analysis of sexuality, with a focus on the social and cultural institutions that shape sexuality in the contemporary U.S.  Connell MWF 10-11

CAS SO 244  Urban Sociology. An analysis of cities and urban phenomena in preindustrial, industrial, and postindustrial societies with an emphasis on European and U.S. urbanization. A comparison of social scientific “theories” used to explain these same phenomena.   Brown-Saraci TTH 9:30-11:00

Women’s Studies

CAS WS 305 Women and Comedy. From Mae West and 1930s screwball comediennes to Tina Fey and female stand- up comics today, explore funny women, women’s humor, what women find funny, and how women use humor as a tool for survival, resistance, and subversion. Gottfried R 2-5

CAS WS 346 Women and Film. Study of principally American films, exploring how the medium has shaped and been shaped by cultural perceptions of women. Readings provide background for interpretation of films ranging from screwball comedy to film noir, “women’s films,” and films by women directors.Swedberg W 1-4 Film Showing: 4-6