Fall 2010 Courses

American Studies

CAS AM 301 Perspectives on the American Experience. American history and society as viewed by those who made it. Topic for Fall 2010: American Folklore: 1900-Present. Examines the role of traditional expressive culture in the history of United States and how issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality shape the political, social, and cultural dynamics of American culture. Buccitelli TR 9:30am-11am

CAS AM 367 Material Culture. Introduction to the theory and practice of the interdisciplinary study of material culture, which includes everything we make and use, from food and clothing to art and buildings. Also offered as CAS AH 367.  Sewell MWF 10am-11am

CAS AM 501 Special Topics in American Studies. Topic for Fall 2010: American Culture in the Sixties. The course provides a survey of American art, literature, film, and visual culture of the 1960s through which we approach the decade’s dominant historical, cultural, and intellectual phenomena and movements, ranging from Pop Art, Fluxus, and the New American Cinema to New Journalism and the New Sensibility. The course will explore the dense intermediality and interconnectedness of the arts and showcase artists who worked in more than one field. Featured artists and authors include Bob Dylan, Norman Mailer, Andy Warhol, Arthur Penn, Susan Sontag, Truman Capote, and others. Grundmann M 2pm-5pm

CAS AM 546 Historic Preservation. An introduction to the American preservation movement, including current issues and modern practice. Considers key aspects of the history, theory, and philosophy of historic preservation, and introduces students to key figures in preservation agencies and organizations in this region. Dempsey T 5:30pm-8:30pm

UNDERGRADUATE AMERICAN STUDIES STUDENTS MAY ALSO BE INTERESTED IN THE FOLLOWING COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS.  THEY ARE LISTED HERE FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE.

African American Studies

CAS AA 371 African American History The history of African Americans from African origins to present time; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time. Also offered as CAS HI 371.  Heywood MWF 11am-12pm

CAS AA 388 Black Radical Thought Black radical thought in America, Europe, and Africa since the eighteenth century through writings of abolitionists, leaders of revolutions and liberation movements, Black nationalists, and Black socialists. Emphasizes the global nature of the “Black World” and its role in world history. Also offered as CAS HI 388.  Blakely TR 11am-12:30pm

CAS AA 504 African American and Asian American Women Writers.  Cross-cultural comparison of African American and Asian American women writers. Explores and evaluates the cultural impact of their work, and looks at how these two groups bound together by “otherness” pursue the theme of conflicting cultures. Boelcskevy T 9:30am-12:30pm

CAS AA 507 Literature of the Harlem Renaissance. A study of the major writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Explores how they proclaimed a renewal of racial consciousness and cultural pride, and how they challenged racial and cultural barriers in American society.  Boelcskevy TR 12:30pm-2pm

CAS AA 510 A study of African American and Afro-Caribbean dramatic literature. Focus on the work of August Wilson, Lorraine Hansberry, Aimé Césaire, and Derek Walcott in the context of Western drama.  Richardson M 6pm-9pm

CAS AA 514 Comparative Slavery. The institution of slavery in history with a special focus on slavery and the slave trade in Africa and the Americas in the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Attention to cultural and political issues as well as economic and social aspects of slavery. Thornton W 3pm-6pm

CAS AA 559 Reckoning with the Past: Reparations and Justice in Comparative Perspective. The debate about reparations for slavery and Jim Crow segregation in the United States examined critically as conversation about, and movement for, retrospective justice. Includes discussion of war crimes tribunals and truth commissions.Crawford M 12pm- 3pm

Anthropology

CAS AN 438 Ethnography of American Culture (area). Provides a theoretical basis for the anthropological investigation of American culture. After an introduction to the classical literature, readings focus on the suburban experience, sexuality and family life, and class in the contemporary United States.  Ferraiuolo TR 9:30am-11pm

Archaeology

CAS AR 370 Archeology of Colonial America Introduction to the archaeology of American life in the colonial period. A consideration of the material culture of early America, including architecture, artifacts, complete sites, and the use of archaeology to confirm or modify the written record.  Beaudry TR 11am-12:30pm

CAS AR 480 Archeological Ethics and Law Ethical and legal issues for archaeologists. Topics include archaeology as a public interest; legal organization of archaeology; international approaches to heritage management; looting, collecting, and the antiquities market; maritime law and underwater archaeology; and cultural resource management in the United States. Beaudry M 10am-1pm

Art History

NOTE:  Description for AH 585 Section S1 is not yet available.  Contact the Art History Department for further information.

CAS AH 205 Architecture:  An Introduction Examination of the factors involved in architectural design including program, spatial composition, structure, technology, iconography, and the role of architecture in society. Discussion of major monuments of Western architecture and urbanism from ancient Egypt to the twenty-first century.  Scrivano TR 12:30pm-2pm

CAS AH 284 Arts in America Survey of American painting, architecture, sculpture, prints, and photography from the early settlement in 1630 to the present. Morgan TR 9:30am-11am

CAS AH 367 Material Culture Introduction to the theory and practice of the interdisciplinary study of material culture, which includes everything we make and use, from food and clothing to art and buildings. Also offered as CAS AM 367.  Sewell MWF 10am-11am

CAS AH 377 American Furniture and Allied Arts, 1630-1830 Survey of furniture and related arts-painting, architecture, and silver-with an emphasis on aesthetics and quality, sources, style changes, regional differences, materials, and construction. Hall TR 1am-12:30pm

CAS AH 379 Visual Culture of Nineteenth-Century America Explores the visual culture of the United States from 1820 to 1910. Paintings, sculpture, prints, photographs, and popular illustrations are studied as cultural forces within the context of expanding democracy, abolitionism, the Civil War, urbanism, immigration, and the women’s movement.  Hills TR 12:30pm-2pm

CAS AH 585 Twentieth Century Architecture and Urbanism Two topics are offered Fall 2010. Students may take one or both for credit. Topic for Section S1: TBA. Morgan T 2pm-5pm

CAS AH 585 Twentieth Century Architecture and Urbanism Two topics are offered Fall 2010. Students may take one or both for credit. Topic for Section M1: Green Design. Explores the historical context for sustainability and Green Architecture. The engagement of architecture with nature is charted through questions of landscape theory, public park making, suburbanization, adaptive re-use, and new green materials and methods of construction, among other topics. Scrivano W 2pm-5pm

Communications: Film & Television

NOTE:  Descriptions for FT 553 and FT 554 sections are not yet available.  Contact the Film & Television Department for further information.

COM FT 553 A1  Golden Age of Television Live television from New York in the early 1950â’s offered viewers a level of drama and comedy of such excellence that it would go on to influence feature films, theatre, and television for decades to come.  We view and analyze the early kinescopes of those teleplays and shows that were aired only once (live TV) and were lost for many decades.  In the process we study the early careers of those great writers, directors, actors and producers such as Paddy Chayefsky, Rod Sterling, Horton Foote, Reginald Rose, Woody Allen, Mel Brooks, Fred Coe, Delbert Mann, David Sarnoff, Alfred Hitchcock, Edward R. Murrow, Lucille Ball, Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Jack Benny, Groucho Marx, Jackie Gleason, and Kukla, Fran and Ollie.  Attention is paid to the great dramatic anthology series such as “PhilcoTelevision Playhouse,” “Studio One,” “Playhouse 90,” and we will also study television political theatre in the influence of Senator Joseph McCarthy’s communist witch-hunt.  Finally, we will take a look at gender, race, class as well as the economics and consumerism that was prevalent in this era.  Loman W 4pm-7pm

COM FT 553 D1 Special Topic Film Criticism. Topics and instructors vary each semester. Details are available from the Department of Film and Television. Hall TR 9am-11am

COM FT 554 A1 Special Topics/Variable. Details are available from the department of Film and Television. Topics and instructor vary each semester. Recent topics have included the films of John Cassavetes, Alfred Hitchcock, Mike Leigh, and Rainer Fassbinder; the Blacklist; and writing situation comedies. Grundmann MW 9am-11am

COM FT 554 B1 Special Topic Women and Film. Details are available from the department of Film and Television. Topics and instructor vary each semester. Warren MW 11am-2pm

COM FT 554 E1 Special Topic Nonfiction Film. Details are available from the department of Film and Television. Topics and instructor vary each semester. Kelly W 2pm-6pm

English

CAS EN 127 Readings in American Literature Selected American writers from the Colonial period to the present. Prose and poetry representative of the American tradition. Primarily for students not concentrating in English.  Lee MWF 12pm-1pm or TBA TR 11am-12:30pm

CAS EN 128 Representing Boston The literary and cultural geography of the city of Boston, from Puritan sermons to modern crime fiction. Readings by Winthrop, Wheatley, Hawthorne, Alcott, King, Malcolm X, Lowell, and Lehane; required fieldwork in graveyards, war memorials, the MFA, and Fenway Park. Howell MWF 10am-11am

CAS EN 175 Literature and the Art of Film Survey and analysis of cinema as an expressive medium from the silent period to the present. Films are screened weekly and discussed in conjunction with works of literature. Students must register for screening, discussion, and lecture.  Monk T 2pm-3:30pm WR 2pm-4pm

CAS EN 220 Seminar in Literature Fundamentals of literary analysis, interpretation, and research. Intensive study of selected literary texts centered on a particular topic. Attention to different critical approaches. Frequent papers. Limited class size. Required of concentrators in English. Satisfies WR 150 requirement.  Patterson TR 12:30pm-2:30pm; Costello TR 9:30am-11am

CAS EN 370 Introduction to African American Women Writers Surveys the writings of African American women writers from slavery to the present and explores the African American female literary tradition in the context of black history and culture. Also offered as CAS AA 304.  Boelcskevy MW 12:30pm-2pm

CAS EN 377 Literature of the Harlem Renaissance A study of the major writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Explores how they proclaimed a renewal of racial consciousness and cultural pride, and how they challenged racial and cultural barriers in American society. Also offered as CAS AA 507. Boelcskevy T 12:30pm-2pm

CAS EN 404 Literary Criticism I Survey of major philosophical discussions of literature from ancient Greece to the late nineteenth century. Figures include Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Nietzsche. Themes include art’s relation to truth, ethics, and politics; interpretation; aesthetic judgment; the sublime. Patterson TR 9:30am-11am

CAS EN 533 American Literature: Beginnings to 1855 American literature from the beginning to the brink of the Civil War. Puritan origins, print culture, American poetic taste, entertainment, and the debate over slavery. Works by Bradstreet, Jefferson, Franklin, Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Stowe, Jacobs, and Melville. Howell MWF 12pm-1pm

CAS EN 545 The Nineteenth-Century American Novel From beginnings through the nineteenth century. Works by Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Howells, and others. TBA TR 9:30am-11am

CAS EN 546 The Modern American Novel From 1900 to 1950. Works by Dreiser, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and others.  Mizruchi MWF 12pm-1pm or Matthews TR 9:30-11am or Boots (MET 546) R 6-9pm

CAS EN 547 Contemporary American Fiction Syllabus varies from semester to semester but this course may be taken only once for credit. Topic for Fall 2009: Examination of a range of American fiction (stories, novellas, novels) written since WW II. Authors include Bellow, Roth, Ozick, Pynchon, DeLillo, Morrison. Topics include modern disenchantment, faith and science, “world-making,” and the fate of character.  Chodat MWF 10am-11am

CAS EN 571 Studies in American Literary Movements Topic for Fall 2009: American Renaissance Poetry. Poetry by Whitman, Dickinson, Emerson, Poe, Melville, and others from 1820 to 1875. Rzepka MWF 11am-12pm

CAS EN 584 Studies in Literature and Ethnicity Two topics are offered 2010/2011. Students may take one or both for credit. Fall 2010: Literature of the Migrant. Eleven novels that all bear on human migrations. Besides examining major issues, focuses on how these books were made. Some texts are translations, but most are written by American authors. Jin W 12pm-3pm

History

CAS HI 151 The Emerging United States to 1865 Colonial society and the roots of the American Revolution; federalism, nationalism, Jeffersonian democracy; Jackson and democratic capitalism; expansion and imperialism; slavery and civil war. Roberts MWF 11am-12pm plus discussion section

CAS HI 354 Religious Thought in America Surveys many of the strategies that American religious thinkers have adopted for interpreting the cosmos, the social order, and human experience and the interaction of those strategies with broader currents of American culture.  Roberts MWF 2pm-3pm

CAS HI 356 The American Revolution, 1750-1800 The political, economic, and ideological causes of the American War for Independence; the construction of a new political system amid the passions of a revolutionary upheaval; and the gradual emergence of a new economic and cultural order in the United States.  McConville MWF 11am-12pm

CAS HI 361 The Civil War Era Social, economic, and political consequences of slavery; Southern secession and the Civil War; political reconstruction; the New South; and the betrayal of black rights.  Silber MWF 10am-11am

CAS HI 364 The United States, 1945-1968 Origins and development of Cold War; McCarthyism, Eisenhower era; civil rights; Great Society; Vietnam; new left and counterculture; feminism; rise of conservatism; religion, culture, and politics.  Schmitz MWF 2pm-3pm plus discussion section

CAS HI 366 History of American Foreign Relations Since 1898 Analysis of the history of American foreign policy from the perspective of the changing world and regional international systems; emphasis on the effect of these systems and the impact of America on the creation and operation of international systems. Also offered as CAS PO 366.  Mayers MWF 1pm-2pm plus discussion

CAS HI 371 African American History The history of African Americans from African origins to present time; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time. Also offered as CAS AA 371.  Heywood MWF 11am-12pm

CAS HI 373 American Thought and Culture, 1776-1900 Major thinkers and movements in intellectual and cultural history from the Revolution to 1900. Topics include Revolutionary republicanism, evangelical theology and democratic theory, Transcendentalism and Romantic culture, antislavery and nationality, Victorian realism, liberal Protestantism and Darwinism, and evolutionary social science.  Capper TR 11am-12:30pm

CAS HI 377 Economic History of the United States Analysis of American economic development; role of factory and frontier; changes in economic structure and institutions; parts played by government and business enterprise in development. Influence of economic conditions and occupation groupings on political alignments and on public policy.  Ferleger MWF 10am-11am

CAS HI 379 Modern American Cultural History Examines Americans’ beliefs and the cultural forms used to convey their experiences since the late nineteenth century. Includes challenges to the Victorian order, growth of commercial entertainments, new rules and reactions to modern life, and changing understandings of the self.  Blower MWF 1pm-2pm

CAS HI 388 Black Radical Thought Black radical thought in America, Europe, and Africa since the eighteenth century through writings of abolitionists, leaders of revolutions and liberation movements, Black nationalists, and Black socialists. Emphasizes the global nature of the “Black World” and its role in world history. Also offered as CAS AA 388.  Blakely TR 11am-12:30pm

CAS HI 453 Three Revolutions Examines the rise of a distinctive Anglo-American political culture in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Focus on the effects of the English civil wars, the Glorious Revolution, and the American Revolution on political thought, institutions, and behavior in America and Britain.  McConville M 12pm-3pm

CAS HI 467 Postwar America:  Issues in Political, Cultural, and Social History, 1945-69 Topics include Cold War, McCarthyism, fifties ideology, War on Poverty, civil rights movement, Vietnam, New Left, counterculture, rise and decline of liberalism.  Blower M 9am-12pm

CAS HI 475 American Consumer History. The history of consumerism in modern America. Topics include origins and critiques of the culture of consumption; the development of national markets; advertising and commercial amusements; and the relationship of consumer society to religion, gender, ethnicity, and class.  Ferleger W 3pm-6pm

CAS HI 530 Drafts of History: Journalism and Revisionism. Journalism has been called “the first rough draft of history.” How rough? We examine several episodes from U.S. history and examine how the first drafts written by journalists compare to subsequent drafts written by historians. In so doing, we analyze not only how new evidence and chronological distance alter understanding of important events, but also the ways that different eras ask different questions about the past, interrogate different sources, and appeal to different audiences. Mts w/JO 530. Schulman and Daly W 3:30pm-6:30pm

CAS HI 566 Ideas and American Foreign Policy Examines the intellectual foundations of U.S. foreign policy from the founding of the republic to the present. Also offered as CAS IR 522. Mts w/ CAS IR522. Bacevich TR 9:30am-11am

CAS HI 584 Comparative Slavery The institution of slavery in history with a special focus on slavery and the slave trade in Africa and the Americas in the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Attention to cultural and political issues as well as economic and social aspects of slavery. Also offered as CAS AA 514.  Thornton M 12pm-3pm

CAS HI 587 U.S.-Mexican Borders Examines the geographic border, as well as political and cultural boundaries inside Mexico and the U.S., from 1848 to the present. Topics include the Chicano movement, maquiladora assembly plants, the Zapatista rebellion, youth gangs, free trade, and music and art.  Rubin W 2pm-5pm

Political Science

CAS PO 211 A1 Lecture Section: Introduction to American Politics. Undergraduate core course. Study of the national political structure; emphasis on Congress, the executive, administrative agencies, and the judiciary. Relations between formal institutions, parties, and interest groups. Students registering for CAS PO211 must register for two sections: a Lecture section, and a Discussion section. Reeves TR 3:30pm-6pm

CAS PO 343 Foundations of American Public Policy. Investigates the social and political roots of U.S. policy solutions. Cross-national comparisons and historical perspectives are used to shed light on seemingly unique American solutions to pressing social and economic problems. Martin 11am-12:30pm

CAS PO 366 History of American Foreign Relations Since 1898 Analysis of the history of American foreign policy from the perspective of the changing world and regional international systems; emphasis on the effect of these systems and the impact of America on the creation and operation of international systems. Also offered as CAS HI 366.  Mayers MWF 1pm-2pm plus discussion

CAS PO 513 Development of American Constitutional Law A survey of the development of constitutional law and the exercise of power by the U.S. Supreme Court. The course is drawn entirely from decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court and the principal theme is the development of national constitutions and power. Silverstein TR 9:30-11am

CAS PO 551 Comparative Political Development An investigation of contemporary debates on democracy and the state, with implications for contemporary American society as well as that of developing nations. Gendzier TR 11am-12:30pm

CAS PO 559 Reckoning with the Past: Reparations and Justics in Comparative Perspective The debate about reparations for slavery and Jim Crow segregation in the United States examined critically as conversation about, and movement for, retrospective justice. Includes discussion of war crimes tribunals and truth commissions. Also offered as CAS AA 559. Crawford M 12pm-3pm

Religion

CAS RN 318 Religion and American Foreign Policy. Introduction to the historical roots and contemporary relevance of religion for American foreign policy. Uses conventional chronological approaches to explore key themes that illustrate the role of religion as input and object of American foreign policy. Mts w/ CAS IR 318. Prodromou MWF 11am-12pm

CAS RN 330 American Judaism. Surveys reciprocal relations between American society and culture, Jews and Judaism in major periods. Analysis of texts, images, and imaginative works are used to reflect patterns of modernization in a comparative perspective with other Jewish communities and other American minorities. Mts w/GRS RN630 and STH TX896. Levine TR 2pm-3:30pm

CAS RN 427 Topics in American Religion. Topic for Fall 2010: Wandering as Practice and Play. Is wandering punishment or opportunity? Virtue or vice? Might this playful practice serve as an antidote to American obsessions with efficiency, productivity, and the purpose-driven life? Possible authors: Thoreau, Twain, Kerouac, Crace, Dillard, Berry. Mts w/ GRS RN727 and STH TX727. Prothero M 3pm-6pm

Sociology

NOTE:  Description for SO 306 is not yet available.  Contact the Sociology Department for further information.

CAS SO 205 The American Family. Nature of the American family and its ethnic and class variants. Social changes affecting courtship, mate selection, sexual behavior, reproduction, marital stability, and divorce through the life cycle. Social policies affecting family life. Interrelations of family with economy, state, religion, and other institutions. Connell MWF 1pm-2pm

CAS SO 207 Introduction to Ethnic, Race, and Minority Relation. Social definition of race and ethnicity. The adjustment of different ethnic groups and their impact upon U.S. social life. How prejudice and discrimination create class identities and how caste relations have affected patterns of integration during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Mts w/CAS AA207. TBA MWF 10am-11am

CAS SO 215 Health and Society. Social, cultural, and intercultural factors in health and illness. Training and socialization of medical professionals, roots of medical power and authority, organization and operation of health care facilities. U.S. healthcare system and its main problems. Comparison of health care systems in the U.S. and in other countries. Olafsdottir TR 11am-12:30pm

CAS SO 240 Sexuality and Social Life. Introduction to sociological perspectives on sexuality. Historical and comparative analysis of sexuality, with a focus on the social and cultural institutions that shape sexuality in the contemporary U.S. TBA MWF 10am-11am

CAS SO 241 The Sociology of Gender. Gender is everywhere – from the commercials on the Super Bowl to the boardrooms of global companies.  Prof. Ashley Mears guides you to think about it in new ways. Mears MWF 2pm-3pm

CAS SO 253 The Sociology of Popular Culture. The songs and images and products and internet sites are everywhere.  Prof. Ashley Mears will help you put it on the social map. Mears MWF 11am-12pm

CAS SO 256 Contemporary American Society. Just how is America different from other countries?  Helps you look at this society and what makes it tick.  Edwards MWF 2pm-3pm

CAS SO 306 Boston’s People. Gillis MWF 3pm-4pm

CAS SO 320 Political Sociology Introduces theories and research in political sociology and comparative politics. Examines the ways political ideas and governmental structures affect current issues, such as U.S. presidential elections, the waging of war, genocide, gender inequality, and provision of social services.  Stone TR 3:30pm-5pm

CAS SO 408 Seminar:  Ethnic, Race, and Minority Relations Formation and position of ethnic minorities in the United States, including cross-group comparisons from England, Africa, and other parts of the world. Readings and field experience.  Stone R 9:30pm-12:30pm

CAS SO 438 Seminar on International Migration Explores the social dynamics of contemporary international migration, ranging from the development of transnational migrant communities to the impact of state policies that strive to regulate migrant labor flows.  Kibria M 3pm-6pm

Women’s Studies

CAS WS 305 Critical Issues in Women’s Studies. An interdisciplinary exploration of current topics in women’s studies. Topics for Fall 2010: Section A1: Feminism: Past, Present, Future. Assesses what feminism has accomplished in the US so far and explores what is left to do. Particular focus on sexual mores, practices in areas affecting women’s and men’s identities and degrees of freedom, the conflict between work and family, and body troubles. Section B1: Performing Gender: Drama, Dance, Film, and Feminism. History of women as performers and representations of gender on stages from antiquity to the present. Section A1 Swedberg W 1pm-4pm.  Section B1 Meets w/ CAS EN 326 Preston TR 12:30pm-2pm

CAS WS 346 Women and Film. Study of principally American films, exploring how the medium has shaped and been shaped by cultural perceptions of women. Readings provide background for interpretation of films ranging from screwball comedy to film noir, “women’s films,” and films by women directors. Gottfried M 2pm-5pm, W 2pm-4pm