Fall 2012 Courses

This schedule is subject to change.  For the most accurate information concerning other programs and departments, consult the University Class Schedule online: www.bu.edu/studentlink, as well as each department’s own website.  Graduate students may not take courses below the 500 level for credit.

American Studies

CAS AM 501 Special Topics in American Studies. Morgan, W 9:00 – 12:00.

GRS AM 736 Literature of American Studies. Introduction to classic problems in the interpretation of American society and culture. Halter, W 1:00 – 4:00.

GRS AM 867 Material Culture. Introduction to the theory and practice of the interdisciplinary study of material culture, which includes everything we make and use, from food and clothing to art and buildings. Explores contemporary scholarship from a range of disciplines. Also offered as GRS AH 867. Moore, M 2:00 – 5:00.

African-American Studies

CAS AA 502 Topics in African-American Literature. Special Topic for Fall 2012: Higher Education in African-American Literature. Examines portrayals of higher education in African-American literature, focusing on print versus cultural literacy, formal versus informal education, and the relationship of acquiring knowledge to political action. Authors include Cooper, Washington, Du Bois, Larsen, Ellison, and Walker among others. Also offered as CAS EN 587. Jarrett, TR 12:30 – 2:00.

CAS AA 510 African-American Drama. A study of the major writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Explores hoe they proclaimed a renewal of racial consciousness and cultural pride, and how they challenged racial and cultural barriers in American society. Also offered as CAS EN 377. Richardson, M 1:00 – 4:00

GRS HI 888 Black Radical Thought. Black radical thought in America, Europe, and Africa since the eighteenth century through writing s of abolitionists, leaders of revolutions and liberation movements, Black nationalists, and Black socialists. Emphasizes the global nature of the “Black World” and its role in world history.  Also offered as GRS HI 761. Blakely, TR 2:00 – 3:30.

GRS AA 716 Colloquium – African Diaspora Arts in the Americas. The graduate colloquium is a complement to the lectures held in CAS AH 316. Graduate students are expected to attend the lectures in CAS AH 316 and be prepared to discuss the issues raised in CAS AH 316 in greater detail and depth. The graduate colloquium will consider theoretical and methodological issues not raised in CAS AH 316, including how African heritage and Diaspora in the Americas have been linked to issues of authenticity, spirituality, and cultural revival. Becker, W 10:00-12:00.

Archeology

CAS AR 570 Approaches to Artifact Analysis in Historical Archaeology. Identification and dating of European and Asian artifacts found on archaeological sites in the Americas, circa 1500 – 1900. Emphasis on methods for analyzing, conducting research on, and interpreting artifacts and assemblages. Beaudry, M 10:00 – 1:00.

English

CAS EN 571 American Poetry to 1860. An in-depth exploration of American poetry from its beginnings to the Civil War, unfolding according to historical principles and paying special attention to the cultural impacts of verse. Authors under consideration include: Bradstreet, Taylor, Wigglesworth, Byles, Wheatley, Freneau, Barlow, Emerson, Poe, Whittier, Longfellow, Whitman, Dickinson, and many others. Howell, TR 12:30 – 2:00.

CAS EN 546 The Modern American Novel. Our course will examine representative works by significant American novelists published between 1900 and 1950. Our goal will be to understand how various American writers of this period respond to the extreme changes identified with modernity. How did novelists imagine the social, economic, political, intellectual, and artistic transformations of the first half of the last century? How did authors fashion new expressive styles and narrative methods to engage new ways of conceptualizing human origins; race and culture; gender; individual consciousness, perception, and comprehension; the organization of society; labor, wealth, and consumption; ethics; etc.? We’ll be interested in looking at relations between the artist, the individual work, and historical contexts in order to appreciate how novels represent society and address matters of interest to communities of readers. We’ll also ask how these expectations condition the artist’s desire to express her or his individual sensibility. We’ll study major developments in the genre of the novel during this time, especially the emergence of technically experimental modernist style and form. We’ll note some of the effects film had on modern literature. We’ll consider questions about new senses of modern national identity, regional distinctiveness, women’s enfranchisement, race relations and ethnicity, the predominance of urban life, the crises of capitalism during the Great Depression, class relations, and the trauma of two worlds wars. Authors will include Gertrude Stein, James Weldon Johnson, Willa Cather, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and Ralph Ellison. Matthews, TR 9:30 – 11:00.

CAS EN 587 Studies in African-American Literature: Higher Education in African-American Literature. Examines portrayals of higher education in African-American literature, focusing on print versus cultural literacy, formal versus informal education, and the relationship of acquiring knowledge to political action. Authors include Cooper, Washington, Du Bois, Larsen, Ellison, and Walker, among others. Also offered as CAS AA 502. Jarrett, TR 12:30 – 2:00.

GRS EN 745 Information Revolutions and Transatlantic 19th Century Literature. This course examines how Anglo-American literature of the nineteenth century participates in (and reacts against) changing informational theories and practices. Historical contexts include the rise of mass print culture, empirical science, statistical thinking, and bureaucracy. Key questions include: What happens to aesthetics and intuition in an age of proliferating facts? How does the relationship between science and literature evolve? How do writers and readers encounter textual superabundance? And how do new informational technologies change literary authority (social and epistemological)? Readings include Poe’s detective fiction (with lesser tales of ratiocination), Dicken’s Bleak House (and journalism), Melville’s Moby-Dick, (and assorted tales), Thoreau’s Walden, (and portions of the journals), Whitman’s Song of Myself (among other tales), Browning’s Aurora Leigh, James’ In the Cage, Crane’s The Monster, and more. Course methods are primarily historical, through readings will include some information theory and methods philosophy of science. We will also so some limited experimentation with digital humanities tool. Assignments for the course will be flexible depending on students’ need and goals, though count on a minimum of twenty pages of formal prose and one in-class presentation. Lee, W 12:00 – 2:30.

History

CAS HI 590 The World and the West. Explores relations between the West and the Third World from 1850, focusing on national and cultural movements in the Third World, and places the African-American struggle for freedom in the United States in global and comparative perspective. Also offered as CAS AA 590. Richardson, T 2:00 – 5:00.

GRS HI 698 African-American History. The history of African-Americans from African origins to present time; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered GRS HI 871. Heywood, MWF 10:00 – 11:00.

GRS HI 704 Science and Christianity. Examines the relationship between science and the Christian tradition in Europe and North America since 1500. Considers the epistemological and metaphysical foundations of both science and Christian thought as they have evolved over time. Also offered as GRS RN 669. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered GRS HI 869. Roberts, MWF 2:00 – 3:00.

GRS HI 705 American Thought and Culture, 1776 to 1900. Major thinkers and movements in intellectual and cultural history from the Revolution to 1900. Topics include Revolutionary republicanism, evangelical theology and democratic theory, Transcendentalism and Romantic culture, antislavery and nationality, Victorian realism, liberal Protestantism and Darwinism, and evolutionary social science. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered GRS HI 873. Capper, TR 9:30 – 11:00.

GRS HI 849 United States History 1830 – 1900. Historiographic investigation of various themes in nineteenth century US history, covering the years 1830 – 1900.  Introduces students to scholarship on such issues as plantation slavery, abolition; Civil War; Reconstruction; and race relations after the Civil War. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered GRS HI 749. Silber, M 12:00 – 3:00.

GRS HI 859 United States Foreign Policy. Examination of the intellectual foundations of U.S. foreign policy since FDR’s coming to office in 1933. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered GRS HI 759. Mayers, M 3:00 – 6:00.

GRS HI 863 Topics in American Intellectual History. Introduces graduate students to major methods and themes in the field of U.S. intellectual history. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition  to the course with the same title that was previously numbered GRS HI 763. Capper, R 12:00 – 3:00.

History of Art & Architecture

GRS AH 716 Colloquium in African Diaspora Arts in the Americas. Study of the transmission of African artistry in the Caribbean, South America, and the United States from the period of Slavery to the present. Topics include Kongo and Yoruba arts and their influence on the arts of Santeria, Vodun, and carnival. Students must also attend CAS AH 316. Becker, W 10:00 – 12:00.

GRS AH 892 Approaches to Architectural History. Introduction to the theory and practice of architectural history. Readings explore varied approaches to interpreting architecture; assignments develop skills of informed and careful architectural analysis. Scrivano, T 10:00 – 12:00.

GRS AH 895 Seminar in 20th Century Art: Paris 1900 – 1945. This interdisciplinary seminar will explore the representation of Paris in a variety of media, from the Exposition Universelle in 1900 to the beginning of World Ware II. Although literature, universal expositions, painting, photography, and film construct very different Paris images, certain common concerns will be studied throughout the semester. Topics include the effect of the continuing importance of the “flaneur”, the effect of modernism on the city, the changing personality of the city as it is  perceived in the different media, the effect of World War I, the methods by which Paris is made orderly and comprehensible through art forms, a growing fragmentation from the beginning of the century to 1940, and the changing nature of the city’s “romance” or magic for both Parisians and foreigners. Sichel, M 10:00 – 12:00.