Fall 2010 Courses

This schedule is subject to change.  For the most accurate information concerning other programs and departments, consult the University Class Schedule online, as well as each department’s own website.  Graduate students may not take courses below the 500 level for credit.

American Studies

CAS AM 501 Special Topics in American Studies. The course provides a survey of American art, literature, film, and visual culture of the 1960s through which we approach the decade’s dominant historical, cultural, and intellectual phenomena and movements, ranging from Pop Art, Fluxus, and the New American Cinema to New Journalism and the New Sensibility. The course will explore the dense intermediality and interconnectedness of the arts and showcase artists who worked in more than one field. Featured artists and authors include Bob Dylan, Norman Mailer, Andy Warhol, Arthur Penn, Susan Sontag, Truman Capote, and others. Grundmann M 2pm-5pm

CAS/MET AM 546 Historic Preservation. An introduction to the American preservation movement, including current issues and modern practice. Considers key aspects of the history, theory, and philosophy of historic preservation, and introduces students to key figures in preservation agencies and organizations in this region. Mts w/MET AM546 Dempsey T 5:30pm-8:30pm

CAS/MET AM 553 Documenting Historic Buildings and Landscapes. Seminar in architectural and landscape recording techniques involving readings, fieldwork, and writing; projects include research on individual buildings as well as groups of resources. Emphasis on research design and evaluation of evidence. Mts w/MET AM553 Dempsey R 2:00pm-5:00pm

GRS AM 736 The Literature of American Studies. Introduction to classic problems in the interpretation of American society and culture. Halter W 2pm-5pm.

GRS AM 755 Preservation Planning Colloquium. A comprehensive preservation planning and advocacy course in which students in the Preservation Studies Program prepare a planning document under contract with a community. Dray W 6pm-9pm

GRS AM 867 Material Culture. Introduction to the theory and practice of the interdisciplinary study of material culture, which includes everything we make and use, from food and clothing to art and buildings. Explore contemporary scholarship from a range of disciplines. Mts w/GRS AH 867. Sewell M 1pm-4pm

African American Studies

CAS AA 504 African American and Asian American Women Writers.  Cross-cultural comparison of African American and Asian American women writers. Explores and evaluates the cultural impact of their work, and looks at how these two groups bound together by “otherness” pursue the theme of conflicting cultures. Mts w/CAS EN371. Boelcskevy TR 9:30am-11am

CAS AA 507 Literature of the Harlem Renaissance. A study of the major writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Explores how they proclaimed a renewal of racial consciousness and cultural pride, and how they challenged racial and cultural barriers in American society. Mts w/CAS EN377.  Boelcskevy T 12:30pm-3:30pm

CAS AA 510 African American Drama. A study of African American and Afro-Caribbean dramatic literature. Focus on the work of August Wilson, Lorraine Hansberry, Aimé Césaire, and Derek Walcott in the context of Western drama. Richardson M 6pm-9pm

CAS AA 514 Comparative Slavery. The institution of slavery in history with a special focus on slavery and the slave trade in Africa and the Americas in the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Attention to cultural and political issues as well as economic and social aspects of slavery. Mts w/CAS HI584. Thornton M 12pm-3pm

CAS AA 559 Reckoning with the Past: Reparations and Justice in Comparative Perspective. The debate about reparations for slavery and Jim Crow segregation in the United States examined critically as conversation about, and movement for, retrospective justice. Includes discussion of war crimes tribunals and truth commissions.  Mts w/CAS PO559. Crawford M 12pm-3pm

CAS AA 588 Women, Power, and Culture in Africa. Understanding the role of women in African history. Topics include the Atlantic slave trade, power, religion, the economy, resistance movements, health, the state, and kinship. Emphasis on the period before independence. Mts w/CAS HI588. Heywood W 3pm-6pm

GRS AA 871 African American History. The history of African Americans from African origins to present time; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time.  Mts w/ CAS AA/HI371 and GRS AA871. Heywood MWF 11am-12pm

GRS AA 888 Black Radical Thought. Black radical thought in America, Europe, and Africa since the eighteenth century through writings of abolitionists, leaders of revolutions and liberation movements, Black nationalists, and Black socialists. Emphasizes the global nature of the “Black World” and its role in world history. Mts w/GRS HI888, CAS AA388 and CAS HI388. Blakely TR 11am-12:30pm

Anthropology

GRS AN 745 Moving Experiences: Cultures of Tourism and Travel. The movement of people across national boundaries as a cultural, economic and political phenomenon. Examines voluntary border-crossing in its various cultural and historical meanings as well as in the representations of journals and contemporary accounts. Mts w/AN345A1. White TR 9:30am-11am

GRS AN 750 Asians in America (Area). A cultural history of Asian immigrants in the United States from the 1850′s to the present, focusing on family structure, gender, generational differences, religion and education. The implications of the Asian experience for understanding mainstream American culture. Mts w/AN350. Smith-Hefner MWF 10am-11am

Archaeology

CAS AR 504 Preserving World Heritage: Principles and Practice. Examines fundamental issues in preservation and management of World Heritage sites. Topics include implementation of UNESCO’s Conventions, Recommendations, and Charters; selection and evaluation of cultural properties for inscription as World Heritage sites; and their protection from natural and human threats. Mughal W 1pm-4pm

GRS AR 701 The Intellectual History of Archaeology. The historical development of archaeological methods and theory from the Renaissance to the present day, including comparison of major developments in Western Europe and the Americas with developments in other regions. Basic concepts in archaeological record and society. Runnels M 1pm-4pm

GRS AR 770 New World Historical Archaeology: Colonial America. Seminar. Material culture of the people who colonized North America. Architecture, artifacts, and a variety of sites – domestic, military, commercial, sepulchral – are studied. Uses of archival evidence as factual and ethnographic documentation for archaeological interpretation are discussed.  Mts w/CAS AR370. Must register for both A1 LEC and B1 DIS. Beaudry TR 11am-12:30pm, R 1pm-2:00pm

GRS AR 780 Archaeological Ethics and Law. In this course students examine archaeology and professional ethics; archaeology as a public interest; legal organization of archaeology; international approaches to heritage management; looting, collecting, and the antiquities market; maritime law and underwater archaeology; cultural resource management in the United States.  Mts w/CAS AR480. Beaudry M 10am-1pm, T 1pm-2pm

Art History

CAS AH 520 The Museum and Historical Agency. The history, present realities, and future possibilities of museums and historical agencies. Emphasis on the collection, preservation, and use of objects, as well as on the interaction of artists, dealers, collectors, donors, scholars, trustees, and museum professionals. Hall R 2pm-5pm

 

CAS AH 585 A1 Twentieth Century Architecture and Urbanism: Green Design. This seminar will explore the historical context for the current issues of sustainability and Green Architecture from the eighteenth century to the present. The recent explosion of interest in sustainability and green architecture will be examined within its larger Western context, with a primary focus on the American situation. The engagement of architecture with nature will be charted through questions of landscape theory, public park making, suburbanization, adaptive re-use, and new green materials and methods of construction, among other topics. The course will involve discussion of common readings, site visits, and independent research. Morgan T 2pm-5pm

CAS AH 585 B1 Twentieth Century Architecture and Urbanism:Trans-nationalism and Architecture. The aim of the seminar is to start a discussion on the transnational character of modern architecture and to verify to which extent the paradigm of transnational history can be applied to modern architecture as a historical subject. Scrivano W 2pm-5pm

GRS AH 779 Visual Culture in the 19th Century United States. Explores the visual culture of the United States, from 1830 to 1910. Paintings, sculpture, prints, photographs, and popular illustrations are studied as cultural forces within the context of expanding democracy, abolitionism, the Civil War, urbanism, immigration, and the women’s movement. Hills T 9am-11pm

GRS AH 891 Seminar: Photography. This seminar will examine the photographic book throughout the years from 1839 to the present. We will concentrate on the book as a unique form for the medium, and study image/text relationships, narrative structures, cultural constructions of the book’s message, the serial quality of grouped images, and the differences and similarities between literary and photographic languages. We will look at three categories of photographic books: photographic albums of original photographs; books created by a photographer or larger agency with a social agenda; and artists’ photographic books. Sichel W 10 am-12pm

Communications: Film and Television

COM FT 543 Television Comedy. Examines the forms comedy has taken in television and determines critical methods for evaluating and judging this particular form of entertainment. Loman M 11am-2pm

COM FT 553 A1  Golden Age of Television Live television from New York in the early 1950’s offered viewers a level of drama and comedy of such excellence that it would go on to influence feature films, theatre, and television for decades to come.  We view and analyze the early kinescopes of those teleplays and shows that were aired only once (live TV) and were lost for many decades.  In the process we study the early careers of those great writers, directors, actors and producers such as Paddy Chayefsky, Rod Sterling, Horton Foote, Reginald Rose, Woody Allen, Mel Brooks, Fred Coe, Delbert Mann, David Sarnoff, Alfred Hitchcock, Edward R. Murrow, Lucille Ball, Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Jack Benny, Groucho Marx, Jackie Gleason, and Kukla, Fran and Ollie.  Attention is paid to the great dramatic anthology series such as “PhilcoTelevision Playhouse,” “Studio One,” “Playhouse 90,” and we will also study television political theatre in the influence of Senator Joseph McCarthy’s communist witch-hunt.  Finally, we will take a look at gender, race, class as well as the economics and consumerism that was prevalent in this era.  Loman W 4pm-7pm

COM FT 553 D1 Special Topic Film Criticism. Topics and instructors vary each semester. Details are available from the Department of Film and Television. Hall TR 9am-11am

COM FT 553 E1 Special Topic Short Films. Topics and instructors vary each semester. Details are available from the Department of Film and Television Burr R 2pm-5pm

COM FT 554 A1 Special Topic American Film in the 1960s. Overview of stratification of U.S. media landscape, 1960-1969. Grundmann MW 9am-11am

COM FT 554 B1 Special Topic Classic Hollywood. Details are available from the department of Film and Television. Topics and instructor vary each semester. Warren MW 11am-2pm

COM FT 554 E1 Special Topic David Lynch. Details are available from the department of Film and Television. Topics and instructor vary each semester. Kelly W 2pm-6pm

COM FT 554 F1 Special Topic Stanley Kubrick. Details are available from the department of Film and Television. Topics and instructor vary each semester. Kelly R 12:30pm-5pm

COM FT 560 The Documentary. Surveys the history of the documentary and the changes brought about by the advent of television. Examines the outlook for the documentary idea in national and international markets. Periodic highlighting of special areas such as the portrayal of war, historical events, drama-documentary, and propaganda. Students develop critical and professional skills. Lectures, screenings, discussions. Poister MW 3pm-6pm

COM FT 701 Media in Evolution. A course that examines the business of entertainment media industries. History, structure, business models, regulatory and social issues will be discussed. An assessment of the emergence of new media businesses, and how technologies, that offer many new content distribution options, are changing the definition of traditional media. Perron Eaton TR 2pm-3:30pm

COM FT 722 American Masterworks. Subjects vary with instructor. Directors include: D.W.Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, King Vidor, Frank Borzage, Victor Fleming, Howard Hawks, Frank Capra, Alfred Hitchcock, John Ford, John Huston, Elia Kazan, George Cukor, Orson Welles, Robert Altman, John Cassavetes, and Woody Allen. Grundmann TR 9:30am-12:30pm

English

CAS EN 533 American Literature: Beginnings to 1855. American literature from the beginning to the brink of the Civil War. Puritan origins, print culture, American poetic taste, entertainment, and the debate over slavery. Works by Bradstreet, Jefferson, Franklin, Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Stowe, Jacobs, and Melville. Howell MWF 12pm-1pm

CAS EN 545 The Nineteenth-Century American Novel. From beginnings through the nineteenth century. Works by Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Howells, and others. TBA TR 9:30am-11am

CAS EN 546 A1 The Modern American Novel. From 1900 to 1950. Works by Dreiser, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and others. Mizruchi MWF 12pm-1pm

CAS EN 547 Contemporary American Fiction. Syllabus varies from semester to semester but this course may be taken only once for credit. Two topics are offered 2010/2011. Fall 2010: Postwar Truth, Postwar Fiction. A study of both fiction and essays by three post-WWII writers: Ralph Ellison, Don DeLillo, and David Foster Wallace. Topics include comedy, irony, media culture, and the relationship between fiction and non-fiction. Spring 2011: Study of major American novels since 1984, by De Lillo, Morrison, O’Brien, Oates, Roth, and others. Course topics include risk, multiculturalism, trauma and memory, postmodern spiritualities. Chodat MWF 10am-11am

CAS EN 554 African American Drama. A study of African American and Afro-Caribbean dramatic literature.  Focus on the work of August Wilson, Lorraine Hansberry, Aimé Césaire, and Derek Walcott in the context of Western drama. Mts w/CAS AA510. Richardson M 6pm-9pm

CAS EN 571 Studies in American Literary Movements. Two topics are offered for 2010/2011. Students may take one or both for credit. Fall 2010: American Crime. The historical and cultural development of the American crime story from colonial times to the present, focusing on the twentieth century. Major authors include Edgar Allan Poe, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, James M. Cain, Patricia Highsmith, and Chester Himes. Spring 2011: American Renaissance Poetry. Drawing on a transatlantic and comparative perspective, this seminar traces the development of Romanticism in American poetry as a movement shaped by the history of conquest, revolution, slavery, industrialization, and civil war. Readings by Freneau, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, and others. Rzepka MWF 11am-12pm

CAS EN 584 Studies in Literature and Ethnicity. Two topics are offered 2010/2011. Students may take one or both for credit. Fall 2010: Literature of the Migrant. Eleven novels that all bear on human migrations. Besides examining major issues, focuses on how these books were made. Some texts are translations, but most are written by American authors. Topic for Spring 2011: Ethnic American Women Writers. Jin W 12pm-3pm

CAS EN 585 Contemporary American Poetry. Tradition and innovation among post-WWII poets. Focus on individual volumes; may include: Plath, O’Hara, Ginsberg, Lowell, Bishop, Ashbery, Merrill, Simic, Hass, Glück, Komunyakaa. Costello TR 12:30pm-2pm

CAS EN 591 Studies in Literature and Society. Topic for Fall 2010: The Civil War in Black and White. Explores race, justice, violence, and nationhood in American Civil War literature. Authors include Stowe, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson, Lincoln, Harper, Chesnutt, and Crane. Visual and historical documents are studied. A substantial research paper is required. Lee M 2pm-4:30pm

GRS EN 604 History of Criticism 1. Survey of major philosophical discussions of literature from ancient Greece to the late nineteenth century. Figures include Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Nietzsche. Themes include art’s relation to truth, ethics, and politics; interpretation; aesthetic judgment; the sublime. Mts w/CAS EN404 Patterson TR 9:30am-11am

GRS EN 676 Critical Studies in Literature and Gender: Representing Gender in American Literature and Film. Gender representations in American literature, film, graphic novels, 1950′s through present. Topics: “Cultures of Consumption,” “Class and Social Mobility,” “Critique of Gender,” “Backlash.” Works: “Lolita,” “Catcher in the Rye,” “Streetcar Named Desire,” “Diary of a Teenage Girl,” “Paris is Burning.” Mizruchi MWF 10am-11am

GRS EN 792 Introduction to Recent Critical Theory and Method. A selective study of recent literary theory and criticism, with emphasis on comparison of critical frameworks and methodologies. Fulfills the graduate requirement in literary theory. Mts in EN 331. Matthews R 12pm-2:30pm

GRS EN 846 Law and American Narrative. Intersections of law and narrative in American literature and culture. Texts include judicial opinions, novels, law review articles, literary criticism. Issues include storytelling in law, readers as jurors/jurors as readers, outsider voices, marriage and divorce, race and gender, intertextuality. Korobkin F 12pm-2:30pm

History

CAS HI 566 Ideas and American Foreign Policy. Examines the intellectual foundations of U.S. foreign policy from the founding of the republic to the present. Also offered as CAS IR 522.   Mts w/ CAS IR522. Bacevich TR 9:30am-11am

CAS HI 584 Comparative Slavery. The institution of slavery in history with a special focus on slavery and the slave trade in Africa and the Americas in the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Attention to cultural and political issues as well as economic and social aspects of slavery. Mts w/AA514. Thornton M 12pm-3pm

CAS HI 587 U.S.-Mexican Borders. Examines the geographic border, as well as political and cultural boundaries inside Mexico and the U.S., from 1848 to the present. Topics include the Chicano movement, maquiladora assembly plants, the Zapatista rebellion, youth gangs, free trade, and music and art. Rubin W 2pm-5pm

CAS HI 588 Women, Power, and Culture in Africa. Understanding the role of women in African history. Topics include the Atlantic slave trade, power, religion, the economy, resistance movements, health, the state, and kinship. Emphasis on the period before independence. Mts w/AA588. Heywood W 3pm-6pm

CAS HI 589 Nature’s Past: Histories of Environment and Society. Historians’ approaches to environmental history, including human elements of technology, demography, local knowledge, political ecology, and social organization. Geographical foci include North America, Atlantic World, Asia, and Africa. Mts w/MET ML595. McCann W 3pm-6pm

GRS HI 749 United States History, 1850-1900. Course description is not currently available. Please contact the School or College offering the course. Silber M 12pm-3pm

GRS HI 763 American Intellectual History. Introduces graduate students to the field of American intellectual history. Approach emphasizes methods of studying ideas and intellectuals in their national, transnational, and cultural contexts. Readings focus on the emergence of intellectual modernism and cultural modernity in the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Capper T 2pm-5pm

GRS HI 854 Religious Thought in America. Surveys many of the strategies that American religious thinkers have adopted for interpreting the cosmos, the social order, and human experience and examines the interaction of those strategies with broader currents of American culture. Mts w/CAS HI354. Roberts MWF 2pm-3pm

GRS HI 871 African American History. The history of African Americans from African origins to present time; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time. Mts w/GRS AA871 and CAS AA/HI371. Heywood MWF 11am-12pm

GRS HI 873 American Thought and Culture, 1776 to 1900. Major thinkers and movements in intellectual and cultural history from the Revolution to 1900. Topics include Revolutionary republicanism, evangelical theology and democratic theory, Transcendentalism and Romantic culture, antislavery and nationality, Victorian realism, liberal Protestantism and Darwinism, and evolutionary social science. Mts w/CAS HI373 Capper TR 9:30am-11am

GRS HI 888 Black Radical Thought. Black radical thought in America, Europe, and Africa since the eighteenth century through writings of abolitionists, leaders of revolutions and liberation movements, Black nationalists, and Black socialists. Emphasizes the global nature of the “Black World” and its role in world history. Mts w/HI388 A1, AA388 A1, GRS AA888. Blakely TR 11am-12:30pm

Law

LAW JD 891 Historic Preservation Seminar. Historic Preservation Law is an interdisciplinary seminar that will explore legal issues encountered in the preservation, conservation and management of historic buildings, neighborhoods, and districts. In lieu of a traditional exam or term paper, students will engage in field research and investigation of real community projects as part of semester long case studies, where they will work with lawyers, government officials and grass-roots advocates involved with the projects. The relative utility of traditional legal techniques (such as land use planning devices, transfer of development rights, zoning, easements, revolving trusts, leasehold covenants and financing) will be carefully analyzed; the policies and impact of federal, state and local laws, including federal historic tax credits and the Community Preservation Act in Massachusetts, will be examined; and possible new approaches will be considered. By incorporating students from related disciplines into the seminar, it is hoped that the interface of law, economics, planning, design review, and the architectural discipline will enable the problems to be analyzed from a variety of perspectives reflecting a client’s and a community’s practical concerns. Freeman M 10:40am-12:40am

Metropolitan College

MET EN 546 The Modern American Novel. From 1900 to the present, including Dreiser, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and selected contemporary novelists. Boots R 6pm-9pm

MET SO 501 Special Topics: A Social History of Boston’s North End. This socio-cultural history of Boston’s North End will survey changes in the region from the colonial period to the present. However, we will center our analysis on the dynamics of culture change among North End’s Italian immigrants. We will examine the causes of immigration conflicts and competition with Irish immigrants, the importance of religious societies and festivals as an expression of anticlerical Catholicism, kinship and regional factors in residential distribution, the context, content, the influence of W.F. Whyte’s Street Comer Society, myths and realities of the Boston Mafia, the impact of drugs and drug related youth violence in the 1980s, and the changes brought about through gentrification, demographic change, and economic stratification. We will also examine the re-creation of the North End as an Italian style neighborhood through studies of tourism, the marketing of ethnic cuisine and lifestyle, and research on ethnic theme parks. We will utilize historical documents and studies of the colonial period, sociological analyses of immigration and urban communities, current research on gentrification, development, and tourism. Course will include 2 visits to the North End. Pasto W 6pm-9pm

MET UA 508 Real Estate Development Various factors affecting location, construction, financing, and marketing of real estate in metropolitan areas. Studies the relationship of public policy to the activities of the private sector, market analysis techniques, evaluation of development projects, and problems of real estate investment. Smith W 6pm-9pm

MET UA 510 A1 Selected Topics in Urban Affairs: Planning Law. UA510 is the designation for “Special Topics in Planning”. The subject matter for UA510 courses changes from semester to semester, and more than one UA510 can be offered in a given semester. For course descriptions, please contact the Department or the Graduate Student Advisor. Smith M 6pm-9pm

MET UA 510 D1 Selected Topics in Urban Affairs: Planning and the Development Process.UA510 is the designation for “Special Topics in Planning”. The subject matter for UA510 courses changes from semester to semester, and more than one UA510 can be offered in a given semester. For course descriptions, please contact the Department or the Graduate Student Advisor. Staff R 6pm-9pm

MET UA 515 History and Theory of Urban Planning. History, concepts, and methods of contemporary urban and regional planning practice. Governmental, nonprofit, and private settings of professional planning; plans, research, and policy development; uses and implementation of planning. Political analysis of planning issues, such as comprehensiveness, public interest, advocacy, negotiation, and future orientation. Case materials drawn from redevelopment, growth management, land use conflicts, and service delivery. Silva M 6pm-9pm

MET UA 620 Urban and Regional Land Use Policy and Planning. Techniques of land use planning, including socioeconomic studies, market analysis and needs forecasting, mapping, environment and service impacts, and transportation/land use coordination. Policies for achieving land use objectives: planned unit development, zoning, development corporations, new towns, and land preservation. Raitt T 6pm-9pm

Political Science

CAS PO 513 Development of American Constitutional Law. A survey of the development of constitutional law and the exercise of power by the U.S. Supreme Court. The course is drawn entirely from decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court and the principal theme is the development of national constitutions and power. Silverstein TR 9:30-11am

CAS PO 548 The Politics of Education. Overview of the origins of public schooling, the purpose of public education, and controversial educational policies and research. Rossell MWF 11am-12pm

CAS PO 551 Comparative Political Development An investigation of contemporary debates on democracy and the state, with implications for contemporary American society as well as that of developing nations. Gendzier TR 11am-12:30pm

CAS PO 559 Reckoning with the Past: Reparations and Justics in Comparative Perspective The debate about reparations for slavery and Jim Crow segregation in the United States examined critically as conversation about, and movement for, retrospective justice. Includes discussion of war crimes tribunals and truth commissions. Mts w/CAS AA 559.  Crawford M 12pm-3pm

CAS PO 568 U.S.-Latin American Relations The international context within which Latin American countries operate, with primary emphasis on U.S. policy toward the region. Includes historical overview, the policymaking process itself, and case studies of specific policy issues. Mts w/IR 568. Palmer MW 2pm-3:30pm

CAS PO 576 Decision Making in U.S. Foreign Policy Examination of international crises from the perspective of the individual decision maker. Critical analysis and testing of the theoretical frameworks used to explain how states and statesmen behave in a crisis situation. Clemens W 12pm-3pm

GRS PO 711 Approaches to the Study of American Politics. Introduces students to major theoretical, substantive, and methodological problems in the study of American politics by examining two sets of literature: scholarly debates and discussion of theory and research, and the concrete research of leading Americanists. Kriner W 3pm-6pm

Religion

GRS RN 630 American Jewry. Surveys reciprocal relations between American society and culture, Jews and Judaism in major periods. Analysis of texts, images, and imaginative works are used to reflect patterns of modernization in a comparative perspective with other Jewish communities and other American minorities. Mts w/CAS RN330 A1 and STH TX896 A1 Levine TR 2pm-3:30PM

GRS RN 727 Topics in American Religion. Topic for Fall 2010: Wandering as Practice and Play. Is wandering punishment or opportunity? Virtue or vice? Might this playful practice serve as an antidote to American obsessions with efficiency, productivity, and the purpose-driven life? Possible authors: Thoreau, Twain, Kerouac, Crace, Dillard, Berry.  Mts w/CAS RN 427 A1 and STH TX 827 A1 Prothero M 3pm-6pm

Sociology

CAS SO 534 Seminar: Modernity and Social Change. Evaluation of globalization. Themes include historical bases of globalization in colonialism and imperialism; increasing global interconnectedness; work pattern shifts; power of transnational and financial institutions; social movements against globalization; possible replacement of globalization with the “new imperialism.” Go M 10am-1pm

GRS SO 808 Seminar: Ethnic, Race, and Minority Relations. Formation and position of ethnic minorities in the United States, including cross-group comparisons from England, Africa, and other parts of the world. Readings and field experience. Meets w/ CAS AA/SO408 and GRS AA 808. Stone R 9:30am-12:30pm

GRS SO 837 Seminar: Sociology of Culture. Examines the mutual interdependence between social structure and culture, focusing on the ways in which belief, faith, knowledge, symbol, ritual, and the like both produce and are products of social organization. Mts w/CAS SO437. Greenfeld T 3pm-6pm

GRS SO 838 Seminar on International Migration Explores the social dynamics of contemporary international migration, ranging from the development of transnational migrant communities to the impact of state policies that strive to regulate migrant labor flows. Meets w/ CAS SO 438. Kibria M 3pm-6pm.

GRS SO 844 Seminar: Sociology of Education. Explores how learning is executed in different settings and persons are selected to fit in various parts of our culture and how the institution of education contributes to social stability and change. Contemporary educational reforms are reviewed and their effects are analyzed. Mts w/CAS SO 444. Swartz W 1pm-4pm