Fall 2009 MA Courses

This schedule is subject to change. For the most accurate information concerning other programs and departments, consult the University Class Schedule online, as well as each department’s own website. Graduate students may not take courses below the 500 level for credit.

American Studies

CAS AM 546 Historic Preservation. An introduction to the American preservation movement, including current issues and modern practice. Considers key aspects of the history, theory, and philosophy of historic preservation, and introduces students to key figures in preservation agencies and organizations in this region. Dempsey T 5:30pm-8:30pm

GRS AM 736 The Literature of American Studies. Introduction to classic problems in the interpretation of American society and culture. Halter W 1pm-4pm

GRS AM 754 Planning and Preservation. Considers the methods employed to protect and plan for the historic landscape. Topics include the history of preservation planning and the broader planning profession, and a review of case law, legislation, and the protection strategies of current preservation practice. Dray W 6pm-9pm

GRS AM 765 American Vernacular Architecture This seminar provides an opportunity to examine influential interpretive frameworks employed in the study of American building and the historic landscape, examples of the approach known as vernacular architecture. This approach emphasizes social and cultural forces in the production, use, and understanding of the built environment and examines innovative and interdisciplinary studies that have resulted in a reinterpretation of the forms and meanings of the American landscape. Each semester the course focuses on recent scholarship to examine how a number of authors have contributed to changing definitions, methods, and theories. Dempsey R 2pm-5pm

GRS AM 867 Material Culture Introduction to the theory and practice of the interdisciplinary study of material culture, which includes everything we make and use, from food and clothing to art and buildings. Explores contemporary scholarship from a range of disciplines. Also offered as GRS AH 867. Sewell M 1pm-4pm

African American Studies

CAS AA 502 Topics in African American Literature. Two topics are offered 2009/2010. Students may take one or both for credit. Topic for Fall 2009: The Slave Narrative. Examines the traditional types of slave narratives published before emancipation, as well as exploring post-emancipation experiments with their forms and themes in the African American novel. Topic for Spring 2010: Twentieth-Century African American Novel. Major works from the Harlem Renaissance, Realism, Modernism, the Black Arts Movement, and the contemporary period. Authors include Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, Wallace Thurman, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, John Wideman, and Toni Morrison. Jarrett MWF 10am-11am

CAS AA 504 African American and Asian American Women Writers. Cross-cultural comparison of African American and Asian American women writers. Explores and evaluates the cultural impact of their work, and looks at how these two groups bound together by “otherness” pursue the theme of conflicting cultures. Boelcskevy T 9:30am-12:30pm

CAS AA 507 Literature of the Harlem Renaissance. A study of the major writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Explores how they proclaimed a renewal of racial consciousness and cultural pride, and how they challenged racial and cultural barriers in American society. Boelcskevy TR 12:30pm-2pm

CAS AA 514 Comparative Slavery. The institution of slavery in history with a special focus on slavery and the slave trade in Africa and the Americas in the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Attention to cultural and political issues as well as economic and social aspects of slavery. ThorntonW 3pm-6pm

CAS AA 559 Reckoning with the Past: Reparations and Justice in Comparative Perspective. The debate about reparations for slavery and Jim Crow segregation in the United States examined critically as conversation about, and movement for, retrospective justice. Includes discussion of war crimes tribunals and truth commissions.Crawford M 12pm- 3pm

GRS AA 808 Seminar: Ethnic, Race, and Minority Relations. Formation and position of ethnic minorities in the United States, including cross-group comparisons from England, Africa, and other parts of the world. Readings and field experience. Stone M 1pm-4pm

GRS AA 871 African American History. The history of African Americans from African origins to the present; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time. Heywood MWF 10am- 11am

Anthropology

CAS AN 593 Topics in Cultural Anthropology. Selected issues and debates in current anthropology. Topic for Fall 2009: TBA. Lindholm T 9am-12pm

GRS AN 745 Moving Experiences: Cultures of Tourism and Travel. The movement of people across national boundaries as a cultural, economic and political phenomenon. Examines voluntary border-crossing in its various cultural and historical meanings as well as in the representations of journals and contemporary accounts. White TR 9:30am-11am

Archaeology

CAS AR 504 Preserving World Heritage – Principles and Practice Examination of fundamental issues in preservation and management of World Heritage sites. Topics include implementation of UNESCO’s Conventions, Recommendations, and Charters; selection and evaluation of cultural properties for inscription as World heritage sites; and their protection from natural and human threats. Mughal F 10am-1pm

GRS AR 701 The Intellectual History of Archaeology. The historical development of archaeological methods and theory from Renaissance to the present day, including comparisons of major developments in western Europe and the Americas with developments in other regions. Basic concepts in archaeological record and society. Hammond M 1pm-4pm

GRS AR 751 Seminar: Mesoamerican Archaeology Hammond T 10am-1am

GRS AR 771 New World Historical Archaeology: Post-Colonial America. The archaeological study of America since the Revolution. Focus is on the archaeological and artifactual evidence for the development of plantation systems and slavery, industrial and urban centers, ethnicity, and modern popular culture. Beaudry TR 11am-12:30pm Mts w/ CAS AR 371, R 1pm-2:30pm

GRS AR 780 Archaeological Ethics and Law In this course students examine archaeology and professional ethics; archaeology as a public interest; legal organization of archaeology; international approaches to heritage management; looting, collecting, and the antiquities market; maritime law and underwater archaeology; cultural resource management in the United States.Elia W 1pm-4pm

Art History

CAS AH 520 The Museum and Historical Agency The history, present realities, and future possibilities of museums and historical agencies. Emphasis on the collection, preservation, and use of objects, as well as on the interaction of artists, dealers, collectors, donors, scholars, trustees, and museum professionals. Hall T 2pm-5pm

CAS AH 580 Architectural Technology and Materials An introduction to the history of architectural construction, technologies, and materials, and their consequences in the built environment. Students receive a practical understanding of the building process and of its social and cultural contexts. TBA T 9:30am-12:30pm

CAS AH 583 English Country House: Architecture, Interior Design, Landscape Gardens Explores the country house in terms of its architecture, interior decoration, and landscaped gardens from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries. The country house has been described as England’s greatest contribution to the Western cultural heritage. Influenced by the arts and architecture of other countries, in turn they exerted influence abroad, notably in the United States. Many houses have been destroyed, others have become icons of Englishness. We will also assess the country house as ‘heritage’. Hall R 2pm-5pm

CAS AH 584 Greater Boston: Architecture and Planning Examines the buildings, development patterns, and open space planning of greater Boston, with particular emphasis on the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Vernacular architecture and the growth of neighborhoods are addressed. Morgan T 2pm-5pm

GRS AH 786 Colloquium in Twentieth-Century Painting and Sculpture The colloquium, which accompanies the lecture course for CAS AH 386, focuses on critical and theoretical readings that relate to twentieth-century American painting, photography, sculpture, installation and performance art, and criticism. Hills M 11am -1pm. NOTE: Class meets w/ CAS AH 386. Grad students must also attend: TR 12:30 pm- 2pm

GRS AH 867 Material Culture Introduction to the theory and practice of the interdisciplinary study of material culture, which includes everything we make and use, from food and clothing to art and buildings. Explores contemporary scholarship from a range of disciplines. Also offered as GRS AM 867. Sewell M 1pm-4pm

GRS AH 895 Seminar: Twentieth-Century Art – Topic for Fall 2009: Paris, 1900-1940 This interdisciplinary seminar will explore the representation of Paris in a variety of media, from the Exposition Universelle in 1900 to the beginning of World War II. Although literature, universal expositions, painting, photography, and film construct very different Paris images, certain common concerns will be studied throughout the semester. These include: the continuing importance of the “flaneur,” the effect of modernism on the city, the changing personality of the city as it is perceived in the different media, the effect of World War I, the methods by which Paris is made orderly and comprehensible through art forms, a growing fragmentation from the beginning of the century to 1940, and the changing nature of the city’s “romance” or magic for both Parisians and foreigners. For Americanists, the US-Paris relationship will be stressed. Sichel W 2pm-4pm

Communications: Film and Television

COM FT 553 A1 Golden Age of Television Live television from New York in the early 1950′s offered viewers a level of drama and comedy of such excellence that it would go on to influence feature films, theatre, and television for decades to come. We view and analyze the early kinescopes of those teleplays and shows that were aired only once (live TV) and were lost for many decades. In the process we study the early careers of those great writers, directors, actors and producers such as Paddy Chayefsky, Rod Sterling, Horton Foote, Reginald Rose, Woody Allen, Mel Brooks, Fred Coe, Delbert Mann, David Sarnoff, Alfred Hitchcock, Edward R. Murrow, Lucille Ball, Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Jack Benny, Groucho Marx, Jackie Gleason, and Kukla, Fran and Ollie. Attention is paid to the great dramatic anthology series such as “PhilcoTelevision Playhouse,” “Studio One,” “Playhouse 90,” and we will also study television political theatre in the influence of Senator Joseph McCarthy’s communist witch-hunt. Finally, we will take a look at gender, race, class as well as the economics and consumerism that was prevalent in this era. Loman R 3pm-6pm

COM FT 554 C1 Lowbrow Comedy An academic film journal recently asked the question of current film humor: “Is there more to Hollywood lowbrow than meets the eye?” This course will examine this question and look at the critical and marketplace phenomenon of “Hollywood Lowbrow” comedy – and the question about class, gender, and culture that these films engender. Kelly T 5pm-9pm

COM FT 554 D1 Films of Joseph Losey The work of Joseph Losey (1909-1984), American expatriate film director, presents one of the most perplexing problems in contemporary film scholarship. The combative Losey, a victim of HUAC and the Hollywood blacklist in the 1950′s, became equally controversial oversees for his idiosyncratic theatricality, flamboyant mise-en-scene and unalloyed criticism of contemporary society. Losey was a true original: a scathing melodramatic modernist. Gilles Deleuze compares Losey to the painter Bacon and writer Jean Genet, and believes only Von Stroheim and Brunel to be his equal in form. As Michel Mourlet writes in Cahiers due cinema: “In Losey’s films it is not a question of a universe but of the universe; not a possible or impossible world, but a real world. We expect in his films the vivid, fresh sensation of the truth; never before has one been as close to human beings, their flesh, their nerve, the pulse of their blood.” We’ll study the history and form of his art from this nascent years in Hollywood, through his films in exile in Great Britain (The Servant, The Go-Between) and France (Monsieur Klein and La Truite.) Kelly W 2pm-6:30pm

COM FT 554 H1 AvantGarde I A look at the classical avant-garde (mostly non-narrative, experimental film) from the 1920′s to the 1950′s, as it developed in Europe and the United States. Movements include impressionism, Dada/Surrealism, and Soviet Montage. Directors include Epstien, Dulac, Vigo, Cocteau, Ruttman, Brunel Eisenstein and Deren. Grundmann M 2pm-6:30pm

COM FT 554 I1 Women and Film This course is an examination of women in film both as an object of the camera dn as the vision behind it. We will consider the position of the woman in film as both image and imaginary, exploring how the image of the woman is consumed as well as created. The course will include readings by several feminist cultural theorists who explore topics such as: Mother-daughter relationships in film, the spectacle of womanhood, speculations on lesbianism, and the woman’s gaze. Films will include Stella Dallas, Dance Girl Dance, Thriller, Privilege, Entre Nous, and High Tide. Fleche R 2pm-6pm

COM FT 554 K1 Cinematheque Structured around visits by film artists and critics of diverse kinds, this course gives students the opportunity to encounter, to study, and to write about film and media in an experimental format. Students attend the weekly presentations, develop a methodological apparatus for studying the artists, scholars, and topics featured, and conduct individualized research for their own written work for the course. The course is contingent on the exciting and changing line-up of speakers who every semester visit the BU Cinematheque. Perry R 7pm-10pm, F 6pm-9pm.

COM FT 554 O1 Four Non-Fiction Filmmakers This course will consider in depth, the work of four important, highly original nonfiction filmmakers: Jean Rouch, Robert Gardner, Ross McElwee, and Errol Morris. These filmmakers have opened new possibilities for nonfiction film and have created enduring works such as Chronicle of a Summer, Dead Birds, Sherman’s March, The Thin Blue Line, and the Fog of War. The films, respectively, mix poetry and anthropology in a forceful way, open to new territory for the personal/autobiographical film, and find new ways to confront public issues and public figures, as well as everyday life. Warren T 4pm-7pm, R 4pm-6pm.

COM FT 722 American Masterworks Subjects vary with instructor. Directors include: D.W.Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, King Vidor, Frank Borzage, Victor Fleming, Howard Hawks, Frank Capra, Alfred Hitchcock, John Ford, John Huston, Elia Kazan, George Cukor, Orson Welles, Robert Altman, John Cassavetes, and Woody Allen. Grundmann T 11:30am-4pm

English

CAS EN 533 American Literature: Beginnings to 1855 American literature from the beginning to the brink of the Civil War. Puritan origins, print culture, American poetic taste, entertainment, and the debate over slavery. Works by Bradstreet, Jefferson, Franklin, Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Stowe, Jacobs, and Melville. Howell TR 2pm-3:30pm

CAS EN 545 The Nineteenth-Century American Novel From beginnings through the nineteenth century. Works by Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Howells, and others. Van Anglen TR 3:30pm-5pm

CAS EN 546 The Modern American Novel From 1900 to 1950. Works by Dreiser, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and others. Mizruchi MWF 11am-12pm

CAS EN 547 Contemporary American Fiction Syllabus varies from semester to semester but this course may be taken only once for credit. Topic for Fall 2009: Examination of a range of American fiction (stories, novellas, novels) written since WW II. Authors include Bellow, Roth, Ozick, Pynchon, DeLillo, Morrison. Topics include modern disenchantment, faith and science, “world-making,” and the fate of character. Chodat TR 9:30am-11am

CAS EN 571 Studies in American Literary Movements Topic for Fall 2009: American Renaissance Poetry. Poetry by Whitman, Dickinson, Emerson, Poe, Melville, and others from 1820 to 1875. Patterson TR 3:30pm-5pm

CAS EN 574 Studies in Literary Genres Topic for Fall 2009: Eccentric Moderns. Examination of poets David Jones, Laura Riding, Hart Crane, Auden, Hill, and Anne Carson in the light of Modernism. Pluralist model of Modernisms emerges. Course combines practical criticism, literary and cultural history, integrating formal analysis and historical context.Warren MWF 9am-10am

CAS EN 579 Studies in American Writers Two topics are offered Fall 2009. Students may take one or both for credit. Section A1: Moore, Bishop and Plath. Through analysis of these major 20th century women poets, a shift from modernism to postmodernism is explored. Topics include: literary friendship and influence; gender and sexuality; relations between the arts; theory and practice of lyric; poets’ prose. Section B1: Faulkner. Faulkner’s major novels and short stories, studied in the contexts of Southern literature and history, American and transatlantic modernism, and his global influence. A1: Costello TR 9:30pm-11am // B1: Matthews TR 12:30pm-2pm

CAS EN 582 Studies in Modern Literature Two topics are offered 2009/2010. Students may take one or both for credit. Topic for Fall 2009: Joyce and After. Readings in transatlantic modernism (Irish, British, American) from 1922 forward. Joyce’s Ulysses is central. Other readings from authors such as Elizabeth Bishop, Ralph Ellison, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Virginia Woolf, and W.B. Yeats. Riquelme M 3pm-5:30pm

CAS EN 584 Studies in Literature and Ethnicity Topic for Fall 2009: Literature of the Migrant. Primary focus on the experiences of immigration and exile, with reading also of fiction on other kinds of human migrations. Works by Willa Cather, O.E. Rölvaag, Nabokov, V.S. Naipaul, Shusaku Endo, and contemporary authors. Jin W 12pm-3pm

CAS EN 587 Studies in African American Literature Topic for Fall 2009: The Slave Narrative. Examines the traditional types of slave narratives published before emancipation, as well as exploring post-emancipation experiments with their forms and themes in the African American novel. Also offered as CAS AA 502. Mts w/CAS AA502 Jarrett MWF 9am-10am

CAS EN 595 Studies in Literary Topics Topic for Fall 2009: American Dream. The powerful narratives that construct, and challenge, the myth that every American can achieve material success and self-realization unobstructed by class, race, ethnicity, and gender. Crevecoeur, Douglass, Alger, Crane, Norris, Cather, Fitzgerald. Korobkin MWF 10am-11am

GRS EN 604 History of Criticism Survey of major philosophical discussions of literature from ancient Greece to the late nineteenth century. Figures include Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Nietzsche. Themes include art’s relation to truth, ethics, and politics; interpretation; aesthetic judgment; the sublime. Mts w/CAS EN404 Patterson TR 11:30am-12:30pm

GRS EN 792 Introduction to Recent Critical Theory and Method A selective study of recent literary theory and criticism, with emphasis on comparison of critical frameworks and methodologies. Fulfills the graduate requirement in literary theory. Mts in EN 331. Matthews R 3pm-5:30pm

GRS EN 796 Risk and Contemporary American Culture. Western societies since the 1960s have been preoccupied with Risk. Course explores role of contemporary American novels (De Lillo, Oates, Powers, etc.) in Culture of Risk, drawing on secondary works to probe subject from various disciplinary angles. Mizruchi M 12:30pm-3pm

GRS EN 798 The New Negro in African American Literature Examines the literature and theories of the New Negro in African American literature between the Civil War and World War II, with special attention to the culture and politics of racial uplift. Jarrett W 12pm- 2:30pm

History

CAS HI 566 Ideas and American Foreign Policy Examines the intellectual foundations of U.S. foreign policy from the founding of the republic to the present. Also offered as CAS IR 522. Mts w/ CAS IR522. Bacevich TR 9:30am-11am

CAS HI 568 The Modern Metropolis: Approaches to Urban History Examines the development of the modern American metropolis during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Considers transformations in commercial life, popular entertainments, and the use of public spaces as well as social encounters across lines of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Webreg restricted. Permission required. Blower 12pm-3pm

CAS HI 582 Social Movements in Twentieth-Century Latin America Examination of the origins, actions, and effects of social movements in twentieth-century Latin America, with particular attention to the relationship between the cultures of everyday life and pathways of political action and change. Rubin W 2pm-5pm

CAS HI 584 Comparative Slavery The institution of slavery in history with a special focus on slavery and the slave trade in Africa and the Americas in the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Attention to cultural and political issues as well as economic and social aspects of slavery. Also offered as CAS AA 514. Thornton W 3pm-6pm

GRS HI 751 Recent American History Politics and popular culture in 20th-century America Schulman M 9am-12pm

GRS HI 763 American Intellectual History Introduces graduate students to the field of American intellectual history. Approach emphasizes methods of studying ideas and intellectuals in their national, transnational, and cultural contexts. Readings focus on the emergence of intellectual modernism and cultural modernity in the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Capper T 2pm-5pm

GRS HI 869 Science and Christianity Examines the relationship between science and the Christian tradition in Europe and North America since 1500. Considers the epistemological and metaphysical foundations of both science and Christian thought as they have evolved over time. Also offered as GRS RN 669. Meets w/HI369A1 Mts w/CAS HI369 Roberts MWF 2pm-3pm

GRS HI 871 African American History The history of African Americans from African origins to present time; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time. Mts w/ GRS AA871 and CAS AA H1371 Rabig MWF 10am-11am

GRS HI 873 American Thought and Culture, 1776 to 1900 Major thinkers and movements in intellectual and cultural history from the Revolution to 1900. Topics include Revolutionary republicanism, evangelical theology and democratic theory, Transcendentalism and Romantic culture, antislavery and nationality, Victorian realism, liberal Protestantism and Darwinism, and evolutionary social science. Meets w/HI373A1 Mts w/CAS HI373 Capper TF 9:30am-11am

Metropolitan College

MET UA 505 Urban Management Examination of selected cases in municipal and public management. Organization, financial management, personnel relations, program planning and budgeting, and issues of public and private sector relations. The administration of municipal functions, including health, police, schools, and housing. Delaney T 6pm-9pm

MET UA 508 Real Estate Development Various factors affecting location, construction, financing, and marketing of real estate in metropolitan areas. Studies the relationship of public policy to the activities of the private sector, market analysis techniques, evaluation of development projects, and problems of real estate investment. Smith W 6pm-9pm

MET UA 510 B1 Selected Topics in Urban Affairs This seminar will explore a wide range of issues related to the environmental impacts of urbanization — including greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, suburban sprawl, and environmental justice — and the political and economic dimensions of the movement toward sustainable urbanization. Special attention will be paid to the principles of sustainability, and to organizations and individuals working to improve sustainability in their communities. Mukherji T 6pm-9pm

MET UA 510 D1 Selected Topics in Urban Affairs: Global Urban Networks This seminar will explore a wide range of issues related to the environmental impacts of urbanization — including greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, suburban sprawl, and environmental justice — and the political and economic dimensions of the movement toward sustainable urbanization. Special attention will be paid to the principles of sustainability, and to organizations and individuals working to improve sustainability in their communities. Caroll R 6pm-9pm

MET UA 515 Urban Planning History, concepts, and methods of contemporary urban and regional planning practice. Governmental, nonprofit, and private settings of professional planning; plans, research, and policy development; uses and implementation of planning. Political analysis of planning issues, such as comprehensiveness, public interest, advocacy, negotiation, and future orientation. Case materials drawn from redevelopment, growth management, land use conflicts, and service delivery. Silva M 6pm-9pm

MET UA 533 Environmental Management and Sustainability The management of environmental programs is rapidly moving toward a systematic approach that focuses on pollution prevention and promotes sustainability. This approach can better protect the environment and provide a long-term competitive advantage to an organization. The course examines current national environmental problems facing both private and non-profit organizations from a management perspective. These problems include hazardous materials and waste, clean air and water quality. The emphasis will be on management systems and sustainable strategies to address these complex, technical and legal problems. We will be exploring a variety of tools and topics including formal management systems such as ISO 14001, pollution prevention techniques, compliance auditing, toxic use reduction, green purchasing, environmental dispute resolution and risk communication. The course also explores the relationship between environmental protection and health and safety issues such as indoor air quality, biosafety and worker protection. Interactive exercises and class discussion focus on practical management techniques. Guest speakers from different perspectives will join us and there will be a field trip to tour an innovative green building. Gaertner M 6pm-9pm

MET UA 611 Community Development Examination of community development challenges in several areas, including housing, economic development, community policing, and resident activism. Analysis of past and present strategies for strengthening communities through case studies, actual government and community programs, guest lectures, and related readings Raitt F 6pm-9pm

MET UA 703 Urban Research Methods Examines research techniques useful for urban policy research. Emphasis on survey research techniques, including sampling, survey organization, questionnaire development, and interviewing. Participant observation techniques. Field data collection and analysis. Silva W 6pm-9pm

MET UA 704 Urban Economic Issues and Analysis Basic economic concepts and techniques of analysis necessary for urban public policy development. Analysis of the economic bases of selected current urban problems and evaluation of several policy solutions to common urban problems. Zizzi R 6pm-9pm

Philosophy

GRS PH 636 Title: Gender, Race, and Science This course is an examination of issues arising at the intersection of feminist philosophy, philosophy of race, and the history and philosophy of science. We shall examine questions such as the following: How have views about gender and race changed over the history of science and the history of philosophy? Is ‘race’ a genuine scientific category or just a social construct? Why are there still so few women and minority scientists? Has the content of science been affected by the fact that it has been carried out almost exclusively by white men? The primary goal of this course is to come to a deeper and more critically reflective understanding of the history of the concepts of race and gender and the various roles that these concepts continue to play in contemporary science. Bokulich TR 11am 12:30pm

Political Science

CAS PO 513 Development of American Constitutional Law A survey of the development of constitutional law and the exercise of power by the U.S. Supreme Court. The course is drawn entirely from decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court and the principal theme is the development of national constitutions and power. Silverstein TR 9:30-11am

CAS PO 544 Interest Groups, Public Opinion, and the Policy Process Focuses on public opinion and interest group activities as they affect the policy-making process in the United States. Attention is paid to the role of the media, of lobbying, of litigation, and of the electoral process. Wilson T 3pm-6pm

CAS PO 551 Comparative Political Development An investigation of contemporary debates on democracy and the state, with implications for contemporary American society as well as that of developing nations. Gendzier TR 11am-12:30pm

CAS PO 559 Reckoning with the Past: Reparations and Justics in Comparative Perspective The debate about reparations for slavery and Jim Crow segregation in the United States examined critically as conversation about, and movement for, retrospective justice. Includes discussion of war crimes tribunals and truth commissions. Also offered as CAS AA 559. Crawford M 12pm-3pm

CAS PO 568 U.S.-Latin American Relations The international context within which Latin American countries operate, with primary emphasis on U.S. policy toward the region. Includes historical overview, the policymaking process itself, and case studies of specific policy issues. Palmer MW 3pm-4:30pm

CAS PO 576 Decision Making in U.S. Foreign Policy Examination of international crises from the perspective of the individual decision maker. Critical analysis and testing of the theoretical frameworks used to explain how states and statesmen behave in a crisis situation. Clemens W 12pm-3pm

GRS PO 711 Approaches to the Study of American Politics Introduces students to major theoretical, substantive, and methodological problems in the study of American politics by examining two sets of literature: scholarly debates and discussion of theory and research, and the concrete research of leading Americanists. Kriner W 3pm-6pm

GRS PO 789 The United States and the International Relations of the Asia-Pacific Focuses on contemporary issues in U.S. relations with Japan, China, Taiwan, North and South Korea, and Russian involvement in East Asia. The implications of social economic, political, strategic changes in East Asia for U.S. policy and the management of international affairs are highlighted. Berger W 1pm-4pm

Religion

CAS RN 561 Religion and International Relations (Meets with CAS IR 561) Explores the role of religion in contemporary international relations in the context of questions about the common core of modernity. Reviews scholarly and policy literature, and case studies, in order to elucidate religion’s intellectual and operational diversity in international relations. Prodromou W 2pm-5pm

GRS RN 612 Title: Buddhism in America The transplantation and transformation of Buddhism in the United States. Time period ranges from the 18th century to the present, but the emphasis is on contemporary developments, including the new Asian immigration, Jewish Buddhism, feminization, and engaged Buddhism. Cogan TR 2pm-3:30pm

GRS RN 630 American Jewry Surveys reciprocal relations between American society and culture, Jews and Judaism in major periods. Analysis of texts, images, and imaginative works are used to reflect patterns of modernization in a comparative perspective with other Jewish communities and other American minorities. Levine MWF 10am-11am

Sociology

GRS SO 803 Seminar: Gender Stratification This course will allow students to further their understanding of the persistence of inequality between women and men in the workforce. What has changed and what has remained the same? We will examine the nature and causes of inequality in post/industrial societies, especially in the United States. Students will have the opportunity to engage in independent scholarship in the seminar, exploring their own questions about gender and work in greater depth. Meets w/ SO403 Smith-Doerr W 9am-12pm.

GRS SO 808 Seminar: Ethnic, Race, and Minority Relations Formation and position of ethnic minorities in the United States, including cross-group comparisons from England, Africa, and other parts of the world. Readings and field experience. Meets w/ CAS SO408, CAS AA 408, and GRS AA 808 Stone M 1pm-4pm.

GRS SO 838 Seminar on International Migration Explores the social dynamics of contemporary international migration, ranging from the development of transnational migrant communities to the impact of state policies that strive to regulate migrant labor flows. Meets w/ SO 438. Kibria T 2pm-5pm.