Fall 2008 MA Courses

This schedule is subject to change.  For the most accurate information concerning other programs and departments, consult the University Class Schedule online, as well as each departments own website.  Graduate students may not take courses below the 500 level for credit.

American Studies

CAS AM 546 Historic Preservation This course covers key aspects of the history, theory, philosophy, and modern practice of historic preservation in America, with a special focus on New England. Part of the core curriculum for the Preservation Studies Program, it offers an introduction to the American preservation movement, current issues, and critical skills that can be further developed in other classes. It also introduces students to key figures in several preservation agencies and organizations in this region through class lectures and group discussion. This course is usually the first course taken in the Program and is offered annually during the fall semester. Also offered as MET AM 546.  Dempsey T 5:30-8:30pm

GRS AM 736 Literature of American Studies Introduction to classic problems in the interpretation of American society and culture.  Patterson T 2:00-5:00pm

GRS AM 754 Planning and Preservation Considers the methods employed to protect and plan for the historic landscape. Topics include the history of preservation planning and the broader planning profession, and a review of case law, legislation, and the protection strategies of current preservation practice.  Also offered as MET AM 754. Dempsey W 6:00-9:00pm

GRS AM 867 Material Culture This course introduces the theory and practice of the study of material culture, the physical stuff that is part of human life. Material culture includes everything we make and use, from food and clothing to art and buildings. We will read a wide range of contemporary scholarship on material culture from a range of disciplines, including anthropology, archeology, history, sociology, art and architectural history, and cultural studies. Also offered as GRS AH 867. Sewell M 1:00-4:00pm

African American Studies

CAS AA 501 Topics in African American Literature Topic for Fall 2008: Political Activism and African American Literature. Examines representations of politics in African American literature, along with the historical impact of U.S. political movements on the tradition’s forms and themes. Authors include Wheatley, Equiano, Douglass, Delany, Hopkins, Washington, Du Bois, Garvey, Wright, Giovanni, and Lorde. Also offered as CAS EN 588. Jarrett TR 11-12:30pm

CAS AA 504 African American and Asian American Women Writers Cross-cultural comparison of African American and Asian American women writers. Explores and evaluates the cultural impact of their work, and looks at how these two groups bound together by “otherness” pursue the theme of conflicting cultures. Also offered as CAS EN 371. Boelcskevy T 9:30am-12:30pm

CAS AA 507 Literature of the Harlem Renaissance A study of the major writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Explores how they proclaimed a renewal of racial consciousness and cultural pride, and how they challenged racial and cultural barriers in American society. Also offered as CAS EN 377.  Boelcskevy R 11:00am-2:00pm

CAS AA 510 African American Drama A study of African American and Afro-Caribbean dramatic literature. Focus on the work of August Wilson, Lorraine Hansberry, Aimé Césaire, and Derek Walcott in the context of Western drama. Richardson T 12:30-3:30

CAS AA 514 Comparative Slavery The institution of slavery in history with a special focus on slavery and the slave trade in Africa and the Americas in the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Attention to cultural and political issues as well as economic and social aspects of slavery. Also offered as CAS HI 584.  Thornton R 2:00-5:00pm

CAS AA 583 Black Radical Thought Black radical thought in America, Europe, and Africa since the eighteenth century through writings of abolitionists, leaders of revolutions and liberation movements, and Black socialists. Emphasizes the global nature of the “Black World” and its role in world history. Also offered as CAS HI 583.  Blakely M 2:00-5:00

CAS AA 590 The World and the West Explores relations between the West and the Third World from 1850, focusing on national and cultural movements in the Third World, and places the African American struggle for freedom in the United States in global and comparative perspective. Also offered as CAS HI 590.  Richardson M 12:00-3:00

GRS AA 871 African American History The history of African Americans from African origins to the present; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time. Also offered as GRS HI 871.Heywood MWF 10:00-11:00

Anthropology

GRS AN 708 Food, Culture, and Society Study of foodways, culinary social history, diet and food ecology with special attention to Asian societies and Boston’s food culture. Examines the use of food and cuisine as a focus for identity, national development, and social change.  White MWF 3:00 – 4:00

GRS AN 750 Asians in America Meets with AN 350. A cultural history of Asian immigrants in the United States from the 1850’s to the present, focusing on family structure, gender, generational differences, religion and education. The implications of the Asian experience for understanding mainstream American culture. Smith-Hefner MWF 10:00-11:00

GRS AN 840 Folk Songs as Social History Anglo-American folk songs and singing styles considered as expressions of personal, social, and cultural history. Topics include finding and using regional and thematic song collections; performance of traditional music; preparation and presentation of song materials in selected projects.  Meets with AN 340 & UNI HU 340. Barrand TR 11:00-12:30

Archaeology

GRS AR 701 The Intellectual History of Archaeology The historical development of archaeological methods and theory from the Renaissance to the present day, including comparison of major developments in Western Europe and the Americas with developments in other regions. Basic concepts in archaeological record and society.  Hammond M 1:00-4:00

GRS AR 780 Archaeological Ethics and Law In this course students examine archaeology and professional ethics; archaeology as a public interest; legal organization of archaeology; international approaches to heritage management; looting, collecting, and the antiquities market; maritime law and underwater archaeology; cultural resource management in the United States.  Elia T 2:00-3:30, R 3:30-5:00

Art History

CAS AH 520 The Museum and Historical Agency The history, present realities, and future possibilities of museums and historical agencies. Emphasis on the collection, preservation, and use of objects, as well as on the interaction of artists, dealers, collectors, donors, scholars, trustees, and museum professionals. Hall R 2:00-5:00

CAS AH 583 English Country House and America’s Cottages Significant historic houses in England and America, reassessed both within the social and artistic contexts in which they were built and in their more recent cultural contexts.  Redford TR 12:30-2:00

CAS AH 585 Twentieth Century Architecture and Urbanism An introduction to major developments in architecture and urban planning from ca. 1900 to the present. Topic for Fall 2008: Trans-nationalism and Architecture.  May not be taken for credit in addition to CAS AH 398 or GRS AH 798.  Scrivano W 3:00pm-6:00pm

GRS AH 779 Great Themes in 19th Century American Art and History Explores the visual culture of the United States, from 1830 to 1910. Paintings, sculpture, prints, photographs, and popular illustrations are studied as cultural forces within the context of expanding democracy, abolitionism, the Civil War, urbanism, immigration, and the women’s movement.  Hills M 11:00-1:00 [Note: Grad students must attend the undergraduate lecture CAS AH 379 as well, which meets M,W,F 9:00am-10:00am. Students interested in taking the course who cannot meet at these times as well should contact Professor Hills directly to discuss potential options]

GRS AH 782 Colloquium in Nineteenth-Century Architecture in Europe and America Dilemma of style in nineteenth-century architecture; study of the relationship of architectural theory to the changing philosophy and aesthetic theory of the period. Development of functionalist theory.  Morgan T 11:00-1:00 [Note: Grad students must attend the undergraduate lecture CAS AH 382 as well, which meets T,R 9:30am-11:00am]

GRS AH 867 Material Culture Introduction to the theory and practice of the interdisciplinary study of material culture, which includes everything we make and use, from food and clothing to art and buildings. Explores contemporary scholarship from a range of disciplines. Also offered as GRS AM 867. Sewell M 1:00-4:00

GRS AH 891 Seminar: Landscape Photography This course will cover the history and theorization of landscape photography, from the 19th century to the present day. Issues to be covered include geographic surveys, environmental usage, issues of colonization, mapping, and the interaction between nature and culture Sichel R 9:00-11:00

Communications: Film and Television

COM FT 543 Television Comedy Examines the forms comedy has taken in television and determines critical methods for evaluating and judging this particular form of entertainment.  Permission required for non-COM Students. Loman M 11:00-2:00

COM FT 553 Special Topics: The Golden Age of TV Details are available from the Department of Film and Television. Permission required for non-COM Students. A1 Loman R 3:00-6:00; B1 History of Animation Dow M 5:00-9:00; C1 The Profane Bernstein F 10:00-1:30; D1 Film Criticism Hall R 9:00-12:00

COM FT 554 Special Topics/Variable Details are available from the department of Film and Television. Topics and instructor vary each semester. Recent topics have included the films of John Cassavetes, Alfred Hitchcock, Mike Leigh, and Rainer Fassbinder; the Blacklist; and writing situation comedies. Permission Required.  C1 David Lynch Kelly T 5:00-9:00; D1 Alfred Hitchcock Kelly W 2:00-6:30; H1 Bres&Tark Warren M 6:30-9:00; I1 Women Film Fleche F 1:30-3:00, 3:00-6:00; K1 Cinematography Peary R 7:00-10:00, F 6:00-9:00; L1 Silent Film Warren MW 11:30-2:00

COM FT 560 The Documentary Surveys the history of the documentary and the changes brought about by the advent of television. Examines the outlook for the documentary idea in national and international markets. Periodic highlighting of special areas such as the portrayal of war, historical events, drama-documentary, and propaganda. Students develop critical and professional skills. Lectures, screenings, discussions. Permission Required. Murray-Brown T 2:00-5:00 W 4:00-6:00pm

COM FT 561 Television Drama Surveys the history of television drama from its “live” beginnings in the 1950s to contemporary taped and filmed series, mini-series, and specials. The critical evaluation of such forms as sitcoms, soap operas, and regularly scheduled dramatic series from the perspective of the producer, writer, and director. Lectures, screenings, writing reviews, and discussions. Permission Required.  Schneider M 1:00-4:00

COM FT 722 American Masterworks Subjects vary with instructor. Directors include: D.W.Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, King Vidor, Frank Borzage, Victor Fleming, Howard Hawks, Frank Capra, Alfred Hitchcock, John Ford, John Huston, Elia Kazan, George Cukor, Orson Welles, Robert Altman, John Cassavetes, and Woody Allen. Warren T 11:30-4:00

English

CAS EN 533 American Literature Beginning to 1855 American literature from the beginning to the brink of the Civil War. Puritan origins, print culture, American poetic taste, entertainment, and the debate over slavery. Works by Bradstreet, Jefferson, Franklin, Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Stowe, Jacobs, and Melville. Otten TR 3:30-5:00

CAS EN 545 The Nineteenth-Century American Novel From beginnings through the nineteenth century. Works by Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Howells, and others.  Otten TR 12:30-2:00

CAS EN 546 The Modern American Novel From 1900 to 1950. Works by Dreiser, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and others.  Van Anglen MWF 3:00-4:00

CAS EN 547 Contemporary American Fiction Syllabus varies from semester to semester but this course may be taken only once for credit. Fall 2007: Examination of a range of American fiction (stories, novellas, novels) written since WW II. Authors include Bellow, Roth, Ozick, Pynchon, DeLillo, Morrison. Topics include modern disenchantment, faith and science, “world-making,” and the fate of character. Spring 2008: Major American novels since 1980, by De Lillo, Morrison, O’Brien, Oates, Alexie, and others. Topics include conspiracy theory, multiculturalism, trauma and memory, postmodern spiritualities.  Chodat TR 9:30-11:00

CAS EN 571 Studies in American Literary Movements Topic for Fall 2008: Transatlantic Romanticism. Focusing on aesthetic and philosophical influence, this course traces the transmission of British romanticism to United States literature. Major authors include: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Carlyle, and Barrett Browning, as well as Emerson, Poe, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson.  Lee MWF 11:00am-12:00pm

GRS EN 588 Studies in African American Literature Topic for Fall 2008: Political Activism and African American Literature. Examines representations of politics in African American literature, along with the historical impact of U.S. political movements on the tradition’s forms and themes. Authors include Wheatley, Equiano, Douglass, Delany, Hopkins, Washington, Du Bois, Garvey, Wright, Giovanni, and Lorde. Also offered as CAS AA 501. Jarrett TR 11-12:30pm

GRS EN 733 19th Century American Women Writers Hawthorne’s “damned mob of scribbling women” in historical/cultural context. Gender, genre, authorship, canonicity, sexuality, class, race, recent shifts in critical approaches. Foster, Sedgwick, Stowe, Warner, Fern, Southworth, Jacobs, Phelps, Hopkins. Korobkin F 12:00-2:30

GRS EN 773 Later Modernism. Modernist poets in the Thirties: their work changed with new social, economic, political pressures between the wars. Emerging poets reveal their debt to Modernism while forging a poetry for their time. Stevens, Moore, Williams, Bishop and Auden, others. Costello R 3:00-5:30

GRS EN 776 Performing Gender. Representations of gender on twentieth century stages and intersections of gender with sexuality, race, and class. The legacy of melodrama, dramatic realism, theatrical expressionism, the rise of film, postmodern performance, readings in gender and performance theory  Preston R 12:00-2:30

GRS EN 788 Transnational and African American Lit.  We will examine scholarship on literary transnationalism, alongside transnational representations of cultural, ethnic, or racial similarity and difference in African American literature, including works by Delany, Hopkins, Du Bois, McKay, Hughes, and Shakur Jarrett W 12:00-2:30

History

CAS HI 566 Ideas and American Foreign Policy Examines the intellectual foundations of U.S. foreign policy from the founding of the republic to the present. Also offered as CAS IR 522.  Bacevich TR 9:30-11:00

CAS HI 583 Black Radical Thought Black radical thought in America, Europe, and Africa since the eighteenth century through writings of abolitionists, leaders of revolutions and liberation movements, Black nationalists, and Black socialists. Emphasizes the global nature of the “Black World” and its role in world history. Also offered as CAS AA 583.  Blakely M 2:00-5:00

CAS HI 584 Comparative Slavery The institution of slavery in history with a special focus on slavery and the slave trade in Africa and the Americas in the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Attention to cultural and political issues as well as economic and social aspects of slavery. Also offered as CAS AA 514. Thornton R 2:00-5:00

CAS HI 587 U.S.-Mexican Borders Examines the geographic border, as well as political and cultural boundaries inside Mexico and the U.S., from 1848 to the present. Topics include the Chicano movement, maquiladora assembly plants, the Zapatista rebellion, youth gangs, free trade, and music and art.  Rubin W 2:00-5:00

CAS HI 590 The World and the West Explores relations between the West and the Third World from 1850, focusing on national and cultural movements in the Third World, and places the African American struggle for freedom in the United States in global and comparative perspective. Also offered as CAS AA 590. Richardson M 12:00-3:00

GRS HI 749 United States History, 1850-1900 Silber M 12:00-3:00

GRS HI 752 Readings in American Political History Introduces students to the field of U.S. political history. Readings are divided into four primary areas of scholarship: government institutions, public policy, social movements, and political culture.DeeseF 9:00-12:00

GRS HI 755 American Immigration History The experience of immigrants to the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include premigration cultures, theories of adaptation, perspectives on race, ethnicity, sojourner migrants, and the persistence of ethnic enclaves in the urban environment. Halter R 12:30-3:30

GRS HI 868 Science and American Culture History of the interaction between science and American culture from the colonial period to the present. Course will include such topics as the American reception of Copernicus and Newton, scientific exploration, the interaction of science and religion, the impact of science on social theory, the rise of “big science,” and contemporary “science wars.” Roberts MWF 2:00-3:00

GRS HI 871 African American History The history of African Americans from African origins to present time; consideration of slavery, reconstruction, and ethnic relations from the colonial era to our own time.  Heywood MWF 10:00-11:00

Law

LAW JD 891 Historic Preservation Historic Preservation Law is an interdisciplinary seminar that will explore legal issues encountered in the preservation, conservation and management of historic buildings, neighborhoods, and districts. In lieu of a traditional exam or term paper, students will engage in field research and investigation of real community projects as part of semester long case studies, where they will work with lawyers, government officials and grass-roots advocates involved with the projects. The relative utility of traditional legal techniques (such as land use planning devices, transfer of development rights, zoning, easements, revolving trusts, leasehold covenants and financing) will be carefully analyzed; the policies and impact of federal, state and local laws, including federal historic tax credits and the Community Preservation Act in Massachusetts, will be examined; and possible new approaches will be considered. By incorporating students from related disciplines into the seminar, it is hoped that the interface of law, economics, planning, design review, and the architectural discipline will enable the problems to be analyzed from a variety of perspectives reflecting a client’s and a community’s practical concerns. Freeman M 10:40-12:40

Metropolitan College

MET AR 690 The Art World An examination of the arts institutions, issues, and forces that shape the contemporary art world. Topics include government, cultural policy, National Endowment for the Arts, museums, symphonies, curators, critics, artists’ rights, public art, corporate support, censorship, and feminism and multiculturalism. Usually taken as a first course. Non-Arts Administration students contact the Arts Admin Dept, 808 Commonwealth Ave.  Ranalli W 6:00-9:00

MET EN 545 The Nineteenth-Century American Novel From beginnings through the nineteenth century. Works by Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Howells, and others.  Boots R 6:00-9:00

MET EN 583 Contemporary Poetry Major voices since 1980 who inherit and expand American poetic traditions, selected from Ashbery, Collins, Graham, Hecht, Komunyakaa, Kunitz, Pinsky, Wilbur, and others. Related readings in immediate predecessors such as Justice, Merrill. Opportunity for student choice of emerging poets.  Moore T 6:00-9:00

MET UA 510 A1 Urban Sustainability This seminar will explore a wide range of issues related to the environmental impacts of urbanization — including greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, suburban sprawl, and environmental justice — and the political and economic dimensions of the movement toward sustainable urbanization. Special attention will be paid to the principles of sustainability, and to organizations and individuals working to improve sustainability in their communities. Hassol M 6:00-9:00

MET UA 515 Urban Planning History, concepts, and methods of contemporary urban and regional planning practice. Governmental, nonprofit, and private settings of professional planning; plans, research, and policy development; uses and implementation of planning. Political analysis of planning issues, such as comprehensiveness, public interest, advocacy, negotiation, and future orientation. Case materials drawn from redevelopment, growth management, land use conflicts, and service delivery.  Silva M 6:00-9:00pm

MET UA 611 Community Development Examination of community development challenges in several areas, including housing, economic development, community policing, and resident activism. Analysis of past and present strategies for strengthening communities through case studies, actual government and community programs, guest lectures, and related readings. Raitt R 6:00-9:00pm

MET UA 613 Designing Urban Space The role of urban design in the community development process. Examines human behavior, aesthetic foundations of design methods, citizen/client participation, and public policy issues. Analysis of actual community spaces. Student design exercises.  Dutta-Koehle T 6:00-9:00

Philosophy

GRS PH 671 Ecology in Philosophy and Literature The genre of nature writing addresses environmental ethics, the metaphysics of nature, the epistemological relationship between nature and human experience, and the spiritual significance or meaning of nature. In environmental literature, each of these categories combine philosophical interpretations and arguments with a poetic sensibility. We will examine how an ecological sensitivity has been transmitted in literature as part of a larger philosophical project of presenting “nature” as a special concern for contemporary societies. More specifically, we must ask, What are the hidden philosophies underlying modern ecology, and why is literature such a powerful means for presenting those philosophies?  Readings will include major writings of Emerson and Thoreau, followed by twentieth-century selections from such authors as Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, Edward Hoagland, W. H. Hudson, Erazim Kohak, Barry Lopez, John McPhee, Wallace Stegner, John Steinbeck, and E.B. White. Meets with CAS PH 471. Tauber W 4:00-7:00pm

Religion

GRS RN 613 Hinduism in America The transplantation and transformation of the ideas, institutions, and practices of Hinduism and Sikhism in America. Consideration of gurus and students, Indian-American immigrants, and European-American converts. Emphasis on primary texts, including autobiographies, novels, catechisms, sermons, and anti-cult polemics.  Prothero TR 2:00-3:30pm

GRS RN 615 Spiritual Autobiography American Spiritual Autobiographies. Explores the literary genre of spiritual autobiography as a window onto the varieties of American religious experience and the vagaries of the modern self. Attention to text and context, classic exemplars and contemporary American authors, and multiple religious traditions.  Freitas TR 11:00-12:30pm

Sociology

CAS SO 534 Seminar: Modernity and Social Change Evaluation of globalization. Themes include historical bases of globalization in colonialism and imperialism; increasing global interconnectedness; work pattern shifts; power of transnational and financial institutions; social movements against globalization; possible replacement of globalization with the “new imperialism.” Go R 9:30-12:30

CAS SO 541 Modernity Seminar I These seminars look at the phenomenon of modernity from a multidisciplinary point of view. Discussed are the cultural foundations of modernity, specifically and primarily nationalism but also Romanticism, science, and major political ideologies. Also analyzed are modernization and development as studied by the social sciences, modernism, and postmodernism in literary and cultural studies; and the nature of man and society in the perspectives of modern philosophy. May be taken either or both semesters. Greenfeld M 4:00-7:00

GRS SO 808 Seminar: Ethnic, Race, and Minority Relations Formation and position of ethnic minorities in the United States, including cross-group comparisons from England, Africa, and other parts of the world. Readings and field experience.  Stone M 12:00-3:00