Category: Uncategorized

Hugo J. Aparicio, MD

September 18th, 2017 in Uncategorized

Assistant Professor of Neurology at Boston University School of Medicine

Click here for his Curriculum Vitae

Screen Shot 2017-09-18 at 12.41.57 PMDr. Hugo J. Aparicio majored in Biology and Spanish at Emory University, earning a B.A. (2004) prior to medical school. He received his M.D. from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (2009). He served as an intern in Internal Medicine at Pennsylvania Hospital (2009-2010) and completed a residency in Neurology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (2013). He was a clinical Fellow in Vascular Neurology at Boston Medical Center (2013-2014) and a research Fellow in Neuroepidemiology at Boston University’s Framingham Heart Study (2014-2016). He completed a Translational Research Training T32 Postdoctoral Program at Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Center (2014-2016) and received his M.P.H. from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (2016). He was appointed to faculty at the Boston University School of Medicine in 2016, and is an investigator at the Framingham Heart Study. He continues to see patients while teaching fellows, residents, and medical students as a Stroke Attending at Boston Medical Center. He is board certified in Neurology and Vascular Neurology.

Research Interests

Dr. Aparicio’s research interests include the identification of lifestyle risk factors, biomarkers, neuroimaging markers and genetic influences associated with cerebrovascular diseases. He studies stroke prediction and outcomes in the community-based Framingham Heart Study, with a specific focus on novel biomarkers and risk factors. He is particularly interested in the contributions of vascular risk factors to brain aging, cognitive dysfunction and the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Awards

Dr. Aparicio was named the 2017 Spivack Emerging Leader in the Neurosciences at Boston University School of Medicine to recognize and support outstanding neuroscience research by early career faculty. He is an awardee of the National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Program through the National Institutes of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke. His team received the 2015 House Staff Quality Improvement Project Award at Boston Medical Center for their work improving care for stroke patients through a resident-based neurology handbook.

Recent Publication

For a full list of publications click here

Pase MP, Himali JJ, Grima NA, Beiser AS, Satizabal CL, Aparicio HJ, Thomas RJ, Gottlieb DJ, Auerbach SH, Seshadri S. Sleep architecture and the risk of incident dementia in the community. Neurology. 2017 Aug 23 [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28835407

Aparicio HJ, Petrea RE, Massaro JM, Manning WJ, Oyama-Manabe N, Beiser AS, Kase CS, D’Agostino RB, Wolf PA, Vasan RS, DeCarli C, O’Donnell CJ, Seshadri S. Association of descending thoracic aortic plaque with brain atrophy and white matter hyperintensities: The Framingham Heart Study. Atherosclerosis. 2017 Jun 23 [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28673480.

Aparicio HJ, Himali JJ, Beiser AS, Davis-Plourde KL, Vasan RS, Kase CS, Wolf P and Seshadri S. “Overweight, Obesity, and Survival after Stroke in the Framingham Heart Study.” J Am Heart Assoc. 2017;6. PMID: 28647687.

Salinas J, Beiser A, Himali JJ, Satizabal CL, Aparicio HJ, Weinstein G, Mateen FJ, Berkman LF, Rosand J and Seshadri S. Associations between social relationship measures, serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and risk of stroke and dementia. Alzheimers Dement (N Y). 2017;3:229-237.

Pase MP, Himali JJ, Beiser AS, Aparicio HJ, Satizabal CL, Vasan RS, Seshadri S and Jacques PF. Sugar- and Artificially Sweetened Beverages and the Risks of Incident Stroke and Dementia: A Prospective Cohort Study. Stroke. 2017 May; 48(5):1139-1146. PMID: 28428346.

Pase MP, Himali JJ, Jacques PF, DeCarli C, Satizabal CL, Aparicio H, Vasan RS, Beiser AS, Seshadri S. Sugary beverage intake and preclinical Alzheimer’s disease in the community. Alzheimers Dement. 2017 Mar 06. PMID: 28274718.

Dufouil C, Beiser A, McLure LA, Wolf PA, Tzourio C, Howard VJ, Westwood AJ, Himali JJ, Sullivan L, Aparicio HJ, Kelly-Hayes M, Ritchie K, Kase CS, Pikula A, Romero JR, D’Agostino RB, Samieri C, Vasan RS, Chêne G, Howard G, Seshadri S. Revised Framingham Stroke Risk Profile to Reflect Temporal Trends. Circulation. 2017 Mar 21;135(12):1145-1159. PMID: 28159800.

Lubitz SA, Yin X, McManus DD, Weng LC, Aparicio HJ, Walkey AJ, Rafael Romero J, Kase CS, Ellinor PT, Wolf PA, Seshadri S and Benjamin EJ. Stroke as the Initial Manifestation of Atrial Fibrillation: The Framingham Heart Study. Stroke. 2017;48:490-492. PMID: 28082669.

Lioutas VA, Beiser A, Himali J, Aparicio H, Romero JR, DeCarli C and Seshadri S. Lacunar Infarcts and Intracerebral Hemorrhage Differences: A Nested Case-Control Analysis in the FHS (Framingham Heart Study). Stroke. 2017;48:486-489. PMID: 28008091.

Pase MP, Beiser A, Enserro D, Xanthakis V, Aparicio H, Satizabal CL, Himali JJ, Kase CS, Vasan RS, DeCarli C and Seshadri S. Association of Ideal Cardiovascular Health With Vascular Brain Injury and Incident Dementia. Stroke. 2016;47:1201-6. PMID: 27073239.

Neurology Working Group of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium; Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN); International Stroke Genetics Consortium (ISGC). Identification of additional risk loci for stroke and small vessel disease: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies. The Lancet Neurology. 2016;15:695-707. PMID: 27068588

Pase MP, Beiser A, Aparicio H, DeCarli C, Vasan RS, Murabito J and Seshadri S. Interarm differences in systolic blood pressure and the risk of dementia and subclinical brain injury. Alzheimers Dement. 2016;12:438-45. PMID: 26542262.

Aparicio HJ, Carr BG, Kasner SE, Kallan MJ, Albright KC, Kleindorfer DO and Mullen MT. Racial Disparities in Intravenous Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Use Persist at Primary Stroke Centers. J Am Heart Assoc. 2015;4. PMID: 26467999.

 

I Remember Better When I Paint

October 29th, 2015 in Uncategorized

I Remember Better When I Paint

Public Television Broadcasts 2015

Groundbreaking documentary on Art and Alzheimer’s airs nationwide on public television in 2015
I Remember Better When I Paint shows how the creative arts can enhance the quality of life for people with Alzheimer’s. The program continues to broadcast on public television stations nationwide in 2015, in particular at the end of October and also in November which is National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month in the US.

Narrated by Academy award-winning actress Olivia de Havilland, this international documentary includes visits to a variety of care facilities, as well as leading art museums in North America and Europe, to demonstrate how creative activities such as drawing, painting and museum visits can reawaken a sense of identity, dignity and engagement among those with severe memory impairment.
Leading doctors and neurologists explain how parts of the brain can be spared and discuss the life-enriching benefits of these new approaches. Among these experts are Dr. Robert Butler, a founding director of the National Institutes on Aging (NIH) and a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Dr. Samuel Gandy of Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, Dr. Robert Green of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School and Dr. Robert Stern, Professor of Neurology at Boston University.
Inspiring personal stories are featured, including that of Rita Hayworth, as told by her daughter, Yasmin Aga Khan, to highlight the transformative impact of art and other creative therapies and how they are changing the way we look at Alzheimer’s.
The inspiration for the film came from the artist Hilgos, who had severe memory loss. When her daughter asked: “Mom, do you want to paint?” She unexpectedly responded, “Yes, I remember better when I paint.” Art students helped her regain a capacity for exchange and communication through painting.

I REMEMBER BETTER WHEN I PAINT: TREATING ALZHEIMER’S THROUGH THE CREATIVE ARTS is written and directed by Eric Ellena and Berna Huebner, and is a French Connection Films and Hilgos Foundation production. The program is a presentation of WTTW National Productions in Chicago, and is distributed nationally by American Public Television (APT). View the trailer to the film here.

Broadcast Dates
(check local listings)
Alabama
Alabama Public Television
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 8pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 1am
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 1 am
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 1am
Monday, November 2 , 2015 at 3am
Alaska
Fairbanks KUAC (World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 2pm, 5pm and 10pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 6am and 12pm
Saturday, October 31, 2015 at 11pm
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 12am
Arizona
Arizona Public Media (World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 4 pm and 7pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 8am and 2pm
Monday, November 2, 2015 at at 2am
Arkansas
AETN-3 PLUS/WORLD
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 8pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 1am
Sunday, October 1, 2015 at 1am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 3am
California
PBS SoCal World
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 3pm, 6pm and 11pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 7am and1pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 12am
Monday, November 2,2015 at 1am
Northern California KQED World
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 7am and 1pm
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 1am
Eureka KEET TV (World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 3pm, 6pm and 11pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 7am and 1pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 12am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 1am
KIXE-TV World (Chico-Redding area)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 3pm, 6pm and 11pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 7am and 1pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 12am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 1am
Colorado
Colorado Public Television
Wednesday, September 30, 2015 at 7pm
Florida
WGCU Southwest Florida (WORLD TV 30.2 Cable 201)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 6pm and 9pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2am, 10am and 4pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 4am
Tampa WUSF
Thursday, March 19, 2015 at 10pm
Idaho Public Television
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 7pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 12am, 8am and 2pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 12am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 2am
Illinois
WTTW Chicago PBS (Create/World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 8pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 1am
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 1am
Illinois Public Media WILL-TV (World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 5pm and 8pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 1am, 9am and 3pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 1am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 3am
Iowa
Iowa Public Television (IPTV World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 5pm
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 8pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 1am
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 9am
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 3pm
Kansas
KTWU (11.1)
Sunday, November 15, 2015 at 11pm
Louisiana
WYES (World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 5pm and 8pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 1am, 9am and 3pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 1am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 3am
Massachusetts
WGBH (World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 6pm and 9pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2am, 10am and 4pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 4am
Nevada
PBS Vegas Jackpot!111 Cable channel
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 11pm
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 4am and 9am
Monday, November 30, 2015 at 1am
New Hampshire
NHPTV PBS (World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 6pm and 9pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2am, 10am and 4pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 4am
New Mexico
New Mexico PBS
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 12am
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 8am
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2pm
New York
WLIW NY Public TV (World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 6pm and 9pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2am, 10am and 4pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 4am
Binghamton WSKG
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 6pm and 9pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2am, 10am and 4pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 4am
Buffalo WNED (Think Bright channel)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 6pm and 9pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2am, 10am and 4pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 4am
Rochester WXXI
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 6pm and 9pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 4pm
Ohio
Cleveland WVIZ (25.3 WVIZ/PBS World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 6pm and 9pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2am, 10am and 4pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 4am
Oregon
Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB Plus)
Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at 8pm
Friday, November 20, 2015 at 5am
Pennsylvania
Erie WQLN
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2am, 10am and 4pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 4am
Philadelphia WHYY (YINFO cable)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 6pm and 9pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2am, 10am and 4pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 4am
Tennessee
WLJT
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 8pm
Texas
Dallas KERA (World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 5pm and 8pm
San Antonio KLRN (KLRN 9.2 World)
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 1am and 9am
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 1am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 3am
Utah
KUED (The World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 4pm
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 7pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 12am
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 8am
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 2am
Utah Education Network UEN-TV
Sunday, November 15, 2015 at 8pm
Sunday, November 22, 2015 at 2am
Vermont
Vermont PBS (World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 6 pm
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 9 pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 9am
Friday, Oct 30, 2015 at 10am
Friday, Oct 30, 2015 at 4 pm
Virginia
Norfolk WHRO (TV World)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 11pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2am, 7am and 3pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 8am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 10am
Roanoke Blue Ridge PBS (World SD 15.3)
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 6pm and 9pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 2am, 10am and 4pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 4am
Washington, DC
WHUT-HD
Saturday, November 7, 2015 at 8pm
Sunday, November 8, 2015 at 12am
Monday, November 16, 2015 at 8:30am
Washington (state)
Spokane KSPS
Thursday, October 29, 1015 at 11pm
Western New England
WGBY
Thursday, October 29, 2015, 6pm
Thursday, October 29, 2015, 9pm
Friday October 30, 2015, 2am
Friday October 30, 2015, 10am
Friday October 30, 2015, 4pm
Sunday, November 1, 2am
Monday, November 2, 2015, 4am
Wisconsin
Milwaukee MPTV
Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 5:00pm and 8pm
Friday, October 30, 2015 at 1:00am, 9am and 3pm
Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 1:00am
Monday, November 2, 2015 at 3:00am
Additional air times to be added. Times subject to change, check local listings.

March 4th, 2015 in Uncategorized

News

Meet the Press: Dr. Ann McKee speaks about head trauma and the NFL

By lmurphy2
February 6th, 2015 in Uncategorized.

Bengals Ravens Football

Continue for the full transcript

Continue for complete video

ABC Australia: Study finds evidence of degenerative brain disease in nearly all former football players examined

By lmurphy2
October 20th, 2014 in CTEMcKee.

Bengals Ravens Football

Click here for audio story

Aljazeera America: Before & After Ryan Freel: How MLB stepped up to concussions

By lmurphy2
October 20th, 2014 in CTEMcKeeUncategorized.

safe_image

Watching Ryan Freel play defense on a baseball field has been likened to “watching crash dummies in a seat belt test” and “bungee-jumping without the bungee.”

In Cincinnati, where he spent most of his eight seasons in the big leagues, Freel’s No. 6 jersey became synonymous to fans, teammates and opponents with playing the game the right way. That meant crashing into walls, sliding headfirst, jumping and diving to get to the ball, doing whatever was needed to make the play. The constant headaches, blurry vision and spotty memory were there, too. But that was baseball for Freel.

In January 2013, Freel’s number switched to VABT-13144. He was no longer described as a 5-foot-10, 185-pound utility man. Instead, the VA Medical Center in Bedford, Massachusetts, labeled his specimen type as “fixed brain fragments.”

Continue reading the main story

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Frontline: 76 of 79 Deceased NFL Players Found to Have Brain Disease

By lmurphy2
October 1st, 2014 in Uncategorized.

Bengals Ravens Football

As the NFL nears an end to its long-running legal battle over concussions, new data from the nation’s largest brain bank focused on traumatic brain injury has found evidence of a degenerative brain disease in 76 of the 79 former players it’s examined.

The findings represent a more than twofold increase in the number of cases of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, that have been reported by the Department of Veterans Affairs’ brain repository in Bedford, Mass. Researchers there have now examined the brain tissue of 128 football players who, before their deaths, played the game professionally, semi-professionally, in college or in high school. Of that sample, 101 players, or just under 80 percent, tested positive for CTE.

Continue reading the main story

NYTimes: Soccer Star Bellini Is Found to Have Had Brain Trauma

By lmurphy2
September 23rd, 2014 in CTEMcKee.

24brain1-master675

Bellini, the Brazilian soccer star who won the 1958 World Cup and was honored with a statue outside the Estádio do Maracanã in Rio de Janeiro, has been found to have had the degenerative brain disease linked to dozens of boxers and American football players when he died in March at age 83.

At the time, his death was attributed to complications related to Alzheimer’s disease. But researchers now say he had an advanced case of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or C.T.E., which is caused by repeated blows to the head and has symptoms similar to those of Alzheimer’s.

C.T.E. can be diagnosed only posthumously, and few brains of former soccer players have been examined. Bellini is the second known case, according to Dr. Ann McKee, a neuropathologist at Boston University and the Bedford Veterans Administration Medical Center, who was brought in to assist in examining Bellini’s brain. McKee was also involved in a finding earlier this year when researchers found C.T.E. in the brain of a 29-year-old former soccer player from New Mexico who had played semiprofessionally.

Continue reading the main story

Dr. McKee presents at SLI Hit Count Symposium

By lmurphy2
July 16th, 2014 in McKee.

 

Alzheimer’s Association Care Coordination Study

December 11th, 2014 in Uncategorized

As the cost of dementia care is projected by 2050 to reach $1.1 trillion, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other dementias threaten to bankrupt our health care delivery system. Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s or related dementias cost Medicare three times as much as a cognitively healthy beneficiary. The quality of care has been adversely affected by the amount of burden placed on the caregiver, and in 2014, the Alzheimer’s Association estimated that 60% of caregivers report a significant amount of emotion stress and depression.

The Alzheimer’s Association MA/NH Chapter is implementing an integrated approach to care coordination for individuals with AD or other dementias and their caregivers in collaboration with three major medical centers. The Dementia Care Coordination project is an innovative model of effective physician partnership, referral, and family support intended to achieve better health outcomes, improve patient-physician-caregiver partnership and communication, reduce caregiver burden, reduce unnecessary clinic and hospital visits, and to reduce overall healthcare costs.In the Dementia Care Coordination intervention, patient-caregiver units in the program will be referred at all stages of disease, to a care coordinator that will specifically tailor resources to the needs of the caregiver and patients, and will follow-up with the referring clinician to ensure better overall continuity of care. The purpose of the current project is the examine the patient-caregiver outcomes related to the Dementia Care Coordination intervention compared to the control condition of the usual and standard care provided by the Alzheimer’s Association. Approximately 200 patient-caregiver units will be recruited for this research from various clinics in the greater Boston area and through the Alzheimer’s Association over a period of 5 years. 

We are currently seeking volunteers to participate in this research study is to examine the patient-caregiver outcomes related to the Dementia Care Coordination intervention compared to the control condition of the usual and standard care provided by the Alzheimer’s Association.

What happens during the study?

Care partners will be asked to complete a set of questionnaires 3 times over a 2 year period. Data from these questionnaires will be used to directly evaluate effectiveness of this new approach to care coordination. Patients do not fill out any questionnaires, but may be asked to participate in care coordination with their care partners.

You may be eligible to participate if you:

are a care partner for someone diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease

The Study is based out of the Center for Translational Cognitive Neuroscience

More information

Please call 617-414-1077 or email JoinADC@bu.edu for more information and to participate.

 

Community Action Council

March 20th, 2010 in Uncategorized

The Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Center (BU ADC) Community Action Council (CAC) met on March 18, 2010. The group discussed a new program from the Alzheimer’s Early Detection Alliance focused on outreach to African American families and churches and a new location-tracking product from the Alzheimer’s Association called Comfort Zone. The CAC meets bimonthly to share information about upcoming events, research, and new developments related to Alzheimer’s disease.

comm-action-council

BU ADC Director, Dr. Neil Kowall (left), and Community Action Council members at the March 2010 meeting.

BU Researchers Link Blood Pressure Medications and Alzheimer’s Disease

January 12th, 2010 in Uncategorized

Researchers at BUSM have found that angiotensin receptor blockers —a particular class of anti-hypertensive medicines—are associated with a decrease in the occurrence and progression of dementia. Read more at health.msn.com.

BU ADC Neuropsychology Post-doctoral Fellowship Opening

December 9th, 2009 in Uncategorized

The BU ADC announces an opening for a full-time post-doctoral fellowship position to commence in summer 2010. The fellowship provides specialized neuropsychology training and is intended for a candidate wishing to develop an academic career in clinical research. The application deadline is January 15, 2010. Read more about the fellowship program and application details.

CTE Featured in The New Yorker

October 20th, 2009 in Uncategorized

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) featured in The New Yorker. Read a recent article in The New Yorker magazine discussing CTE, featuring Dr. Ann McKee of the Center for Traumatic Encephalopathy and director of the BU ADC Neuropathology Core. View a slideshow demonstating the traumatic effects of contact sports on the brain.

Honorary and Memorial Contributions

September 19th, 2009 in Uncategorized

The Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Center (BU ADC) is involved in a variety of clinical, research, and educational activities. These activities are funded by grants awarded from the National Institutes of Health and nonprofit organizations. Often, research study participants, families, or community leaders wish to contribute to the fight against Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and these private donations are equally important to advancing the BU ADC’s mission. The BU ADC welcomes honorary and memorial donations, as these gifts are an excellent way to pay tribute to a family member or friend while making a contribution to the advancement of research in the field of AD. Please call Harriet Kornfeld at 617-638-5676 or visit us online at www-staging.bu.edu/alzresearch if you would like to make a donation.

The BU ADC would like to recognize the following private donors for their greatly appreciated contributions:

In memory of Philip Balducci
Dominic and Rosalie Cardone

In memory of Ben Chinitz
Ron Jacobs

In memory of Eileen Consolmango
Julie Holland
Renee Metterville
Rich and Ka Nelson
Joseph H. & Judith A. Porto
Mark Goldman

In memory of Robert J. Therrien
William and Rita MacLeod
Cynthia and Saul Bauman
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Therrien
Paul Paslaski

In memory of Frank Sirois
Denise Hamel
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Sirois

In memory of Morris Phipps
Brent and Laurie Brooks

HOPE Participant Appreciation Brunch

September 19th, 2009 in Uncategorized

hope-cook-carroll

HOPE Study participant Mary Carroll (right) and HOPE Psychometrician Elana Cook

Funded by the National Institute on Aging, the Health Outreach Program for the Elderly (HOPE) study evaluates memory and thinking abilities of older adults throughout their lives. The HOPE study serves as the Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Center (BU ADC) research registry and includes approximately 500 participants, all of whom agree to be contacted for recruitment into other BU ADC-approved studies. On June 5th, 2009, the HOPE study held its participant appreciation event, the HOPE Brunch, at the Marriot hotel in Newton, MA, with over 200 people in attendance.

The purpose of the brunch was to recognize participants for their valued involvement in the HOPE study and to provide the latest updates on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research. According to Eric Steinberg, HOPE study project manager, “It’s very heartening for volunteers who are committed to the fight against AD to come together for an educational experience.”

The event began with introductions from Mr. Steinberg, BU ADC Director Dr. Neil Kowall, and Mr. Michael Kincade, who serves as Safety Services and Community Programs Manager for the Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. The program continued with short presentations from a panel of BU ADC researchers that focused on the latest research on AD prevention and treatment methods, the results of the HOPE satisfaction survey, and scientific advances that have resulted directly from the participation and dedication of HOPE participants. Dr. Ann McKee, BU ADC Neuropathology Core Director, elaborated on the purpose of brain donation in AD research. HOPE participant Ms. Phyllis Eliasberg then read a touching letter that she had written to her sons about her decision to participate in the BU ADC brain donation program.

Throughout the brunch, raffles were held with prizes, and certificates of distinction were awarded to individuals for participation in the HOPE study for six years or longer. The BU ADC would like to extend a sincere thank you to everyone who attended the brunch.