Critiques of Recent Publications

Note: FOR AN ARCHIVE OF CRITIQUES, BY TOPIC, PUBLISHED BETWEEN APRIL, 2010 AND APRIL 2011, CLICK HERE.

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Critique 141:  A world-wide study of alcohol consumption and the risk of myocardial infarction  –  3 July 2014

The authors report on data collected in the INTERHEART Study, a large international collaborative project of individuals with a first myocardial infarction (MI) and age- and sex-matched controls from 52 countries in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Australia, North and South America.  Included were nations with very divergent lifestyles, religions, degrees of development, and drinking habits.  The authors attempted to provide a “world-wide” overview of the relation of alcohol consumption to the risk of myocardial infarction (MI).  However, they were forced to use a case-control design, a type of study with many opportunities for bias and one that prevents determination of a causal relation.  Further, the lack of detailed data on the amount of alcohol consumed by individuals weakens their results. 

While the authors state that their study shows that low levels of alcohol use are associated with a moderate reduction in the risk of MI, they point out differences in results in different countries.  Forum members considered that these large differences severely limit their ability to use such a dataset to provide overall conclusions on alcohol and MI.  For example, only 1% of the non-drinkers in this study came from W. Europe and 1% from North America, while more than 70% of the non-drinkers came from the Middle East or Asia.  With such diversity (e.g., almost all the abstainers were from one area), it is not possible to adequately “adjust” for such regional differences in analysis. 

The authors also studied how alcohol consumption shortly prior to (in the 24 hours before) the occurrence of a MI relate to the short-term risk of MI.  While their results show an increased risk for heavy drinking immediately prior to an MI (a result that differs from that of some previous studies), they admit analytic problems, stating: “Thus there remains uncertainty over the risk of MI in the period immediately following alcohol intake.”

Previous large prospective cohort studies (a type of epidemiologic study that decreases the risk of recall bias regarding alcohol intake and certain types of confounding) have clearly shown an inverse relation between moderate alcohol consumption and MI.  Most of the previous studies have provided much more detailed data on alcohol exposure than did the present study.  The authors realized many of these problems, and warn against using their results to make overall conclusions about the association between alcohol and MI from their paper.  They state: “The associations observed between alcohol use and MI may be accounted for by unmeasured confounders such as genetic differences between populations, variation in alcohol type or preparation, and heterogeneity of social context. The present analysis should therefore prompt further research to clarify the nature of the association between alcohol use and MI.” Unfortunately, the conclusions presented in the abstract and in the do not mention such problems. 

Some Forum members worried that many readers of the paper will be left with a very misleading impression of the relation of alcohol consumption to myocardial infarction, and will not be aware that the conclusions trumpeted in the abstract are compromised by weak data.  Overall, members considered that the present paper adds little to our knowledge about the risks and benefits of alcohol in relation to cardiovascular disease.

Reference:  Leong DP, Smyth A. Teo KK, McKee M, Rangarajan S, Pais P, Liu L, Yusuf S, on behalf of the INTERHEART investigators.  Patterns of Alcohol Consumption and Myocardial Infarction Risk: Observations from 52 Countries in the INTERHEART Case-Control Study.  Circulation 2014 (pre-publication) DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.007627.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 140: A meta-analysis shows that light alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of stroke, while heavier drinking may increase risk  –  5 June 2014

Most epidemiologic studies have shown a reduction in the risk of ischemic stroke (and total stroke, as ischemic stroke is by far the most common type in western countries) to be associated with light to moderate alcohol consumption.  The present study, a meta-analysis, was based on 27 prospective studies; the authors categorized a reported intake of <15 g/day as light consumption, and 15-30 g/day as moderate consumption.  The authors point out differences (greater smoking, larger amounts of alcohol) between Chinese subjects and those from other countries, which may explain some of the differences shown between alcohol’s effects in the different countries.  They also point out that they had no data on the pattern of drinking (regular, moderate intake versus binge-drinking) or on the type of alcoholic beverage consumed. 

The key results of the study are a significant 15% reduction in total stroke for low alcohol intake, no effect for moderate, and a 20% increased risk for heavy alcohol consumption (RR 1.20, 95% CI 1.01, 1.43).  Analyses were also done according to type of stroke: for ischemic stroke and stroke mortality there were decreases for low alcohol intake, but no significant effects of either moderate or heavy intake.  For hemorrhagic stroke, the RR for subjects reporting heavy alcohol intake was higher than that of abstainers, but none of the differences between drinkers and non-drinkers was statistically significant.  

This meta-analysis supports previous findings of a decrease in the risk of most strokes with light drinking and possibly an increase in the risk for heavy drinking.  Forum members generally agreed with the conclusions of the authors: “Low alcohol intake is associated with a reduced risk of stroke morbidity and mortality, whereas heavy alcohol intake is associated with an increased risk of total stroke.  The association between alcohol intake and stroke morbidity and mortality is J-shaped.  An alcohol intake of 0-20 grams/day is associated with decreased rates of stroke morbidity and mortality.” 

Reference:  Zhang C, Qin Y-Y,Chen Q, Jiang H, Chen X-Z, Xu C-L, Mao P-J, He J, Zhou Y-H.  Alcohol intake and risk of stroke: A dose–response meta-analysis of prospective studies.  Int J Cardiol 2014; pre-publication; http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2014.04.225.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 139:  Does adjustment for stress levels explain the protective effect of moderate drinking on the risk of mortality?  –  18 May 2014

An inverse association between moderate alcohol consumption and total mortality has been reported in most prospective epidemiologic studies, even after adjustments for all known potential confounders.  The present analysis was carried out specifically to focus on the effects of psychosocial stressors on the association, using a large population-based German cohort from the WHO MONICA study.  No alcohol intake was reported by 15.3% of males and 41.8% of females; “moderate drinking” was defined as an average intake of 0.1-39.9 g/day for men (making up 51.1% of the cohort) and 0.1 – 19.9 g/day for women (38.8% of the cohort).  Although data are not presented, there were apparently few women in the higher drinking categories. 

The authors related the effects of including, or not including, in their equations a large number of psychosocial stressors, including educational level, occupational status, several indices of social support, job strain symptoms, depressive symptoms, somatic symptoms, and self-perceived health status, in the estimation of the effects of alcohol consumption on risk of total mortality over an average follow-up period of 12 years.  In their analyses, there was little effect on risk estimates for mortality when these factors were added to the multi-variable analysis.  The authors conclude: “The observed protective effect of moderate drinking could not be attributed to misclassification or confounding by psychosocial stressors.”  

The authors have demonstrated among men a “U-shaped” curve, with the risk for moderate drinkers being 25-30% lower than that of both non-drinkers and heavier drinkers.  For women, there was a lower estimated mortality risk ratio for all drinkers than for non-drinkers, although the confidence intervals included 1.0 in all categories (perhaps, as the authors state, there were few women in their higher categories of alcohol intake). 

Forum reviewers thought that this was a well-done analysis of a large population-based population.  It did not support the hypothesis that social support, job strain, depressive symptoms, and other such psychosocial factors have a strong influence on the demonstrated inverse relation between moderate alcohol consumption and total mortality.  Thus, this study provides additional evidence that the observed reduction in total mortality seen among moderate drinkers is not due to confounding by other lifestyle factors, including psychosocial stressors.

Reference:  Ruf E, Baumert J, Meisinger C, Döring A, Ladwig K-H, and for the MONICA/KORA Investigators.  Are psychosocial stressors associated with the relationship of alcohol consumption and all-cause mortality?  BMC Public Health 2014, 14:312.  http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/14/312.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 138:  Underreporting of alcohol intake affects the relation of alcohol to the risk of cancer  –  23 April 2014

Epidemiologists are often faced with reported adverse health effects of alcohol among subjects reporting very low levels of consumption, levels that physiologically should not cause diseases such as cancer.  It is often assumed that at least some of the subjects reporting low levels of intake may be underreporting their actual intake, but heretofore it has been difficult to judge this. 

In the present study, the authors used each subject’s computer-based data on conditions and diseases (including laboratory and social factors), related to alcohol misuse, collected over many years to identify subjects reporting “light-to-moderate” alcohol intake who were likely, or unlikely, to be underreporting their intake at a baseline examination.  Overall, 18.4% of subjects were suspected of being underreporters while 46.5% had adequate data that suggested that they were not underreporters.  (The remaining 35.1% of subjects had inadequate data stored in the computer to be classified.) 

Among their cohort of more than 100,000 subjects, 14,880 developed cancer during an average follow-up period of 18 years.  There were 23,363 subjects who reported that they were light (up to 1 drink/day) or moderate (1 to 2 drinks/day) drinkers.  In all comparisons, subjects suspected of being underreporters of their alcohol intake had a higher risk of cancer than those not categorized as being underreporters.  For example, among subjects reporting 1 to 2 drinks/day, in comparison with non-drinkers, the risk ratio of any type of cancer among those considered to not be underreporters was 0.98 (95% CI 0.87-1.09); in other words, no effect on cancer risk from alcohol.  For those categorized underreporters, however, the relative risk of any cancer was 1.33 (95% CI 1.21–1.45).  Similar results were seen for alcohol-related cancers as for any cancer.  Also, the risk of breast cancer among women was less than one-half as high among moderate drinkers who were unlikely to be underreporters of their alcohol intake as among those considered likely to be underreporting their drinking.

Adjusting for confounding in prospective studies is an ever-present challenge for epidemiologists.  One factor that has often been considered probable, but difficult to adjust for, is the underreporting of actual alcohol intake by subjects.  Being able to adjust for such unerreporting would greatly improve studies relating alcohol consumption to the risk of cancer (and other chronic diseases).  For epidemiologic studies that have extensive longitudinal data on all medical conditions (such as the Kaiser-Permanente Study, the basis for these analyses), the approach described in this paper could be an extremely valuable way of seeking the true relation between light-to-moderate alcohol intake and cancer as well as with a variety of other health outcomes. Based on the present study, an increase in the risk of cancer among light-to-moderate drinkers may occur primarily among those who underreport their alcohol intake.

Reference:  Klatsky AL, Udaltsova N, Li Y, Baer D, Tran HN, Friedman GD.  Moderate alcohol intake and cancer: the role of underreporting.  Cancer Causes Control 2014; on-line publication; DOI 10.1007/s10552-014-0372-8 2014.

Potential Conflict of Interest:  The first author of this paper, Dr. Klatsky, is a member of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research.  While he has not contributed to this critique, readers may wish to take this fact into account when interpreting the conclusions of the review.   

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 137:  Alcohol intake prior to and during pregnancy and birth outcomes  –  28 March 2014

The present analysis was carried out among 1,264 women from Leeds, UK, whose alcohol intake was estimated prior to and during pregnancy.  The outcomes were birth weight of the infant and whether or not it was small for gestational age (SGA).   In comparison with most previous research on this topic, this study is notable for being of a relatively small size.  Further, it had a high percentage of women who consumed alcohol both prior to and during the first trimester, had a very low participation rate of eligible women (only 30%), failed to present estimated effects by ethnicity, and had some questions related to residual confounding.  It is unclear how the results of this study increase our knowledge of maternal alcohol consumption and birth outcomes.

Forum members do not believe that the consumption of alcohol should be recommended for pregnant women.  A certain percentage of newborns will be small for gestational age, have certain deformities, and have later emotional and behavioral abnormalities.  If a woman has consumed any alcohol during the pregnancy, she (and perhaps even her doctor) may blame the abnormality on alcohol consumption, whether or not it had anything to do with it.  Hence, the majority of Forum members agree that women should not be encouraged to consume alcohol during pregnancy. 

Further, scientific data are very consistent on the potential risks of serious adverse health outcomes of the infant from heavy maternal drinking, especially among women who are alcoholics.  Heavy-drinking women who become pregnant should be strongly urged to stop their drinking.

On the other hand, sound data indicating harmful effects on the fetus of light or occasional drinking by a pregnant woman are difficult to come by.  Because of the epidemiologic concerns of the present paper, described in our Forum critique, we do not believe that this study adds materially to our understanding of the topic.  The serious anxiety occurring among some women who may have ingested some alcohol prior to learning that they were pregnant seems, based on numerous studies, to generally be unnecessary; the need to abort a fetus because of previous light drinking by the mother cannot be justified.   

There is a serious problem in interpreting all studies of prenatal alcohol exposure and the outcomes of pregnancy because of potential confounding, especially by ethnicity, education, smoking, coexisting use of illegal drugs, etc.  Further, alcohol use by pregnant women has become an especially emotional and even a moral issue, and the entangled confounders make rational analysis most difficult.  This means that there is a difficult challenge for epidemiologists and statisticians, as well as for public health officials and the general public, about how to interpret results of individual research projects.  The literature can support varying views, from no alcohol at all for those who might soon be expectant mothers to being able to drink moderately throughout pregnancy.

Also, it should be pointed out that the potential health benefits of moderate alcohol consumption relate primarily to middle-aged and older people, so there is no reason for pregnant women to consume alcohol for its “health effects.”  Thus, it is very reasonable that the majority of women choose to avoid alcohol during pregnancy.  Further, heavy drinking during pregnancy has known potentially serious consequences, and should never be encouraged.  Finally, there is insufficient scientific evidence that an occasional drink of alcohol during pregnancy leads to harm to the fetus, and should not cause undue alarm in a pregnant woman who may have consumed some alcohol before she realized she was pregnant.

 Reference:  Nykjaer C, Alwan NA, Greenwood DC, Simpson NAB, Hay AWM, White KLM, Cade JE.   Maternal alcohol intake prior to and during pregnancy and risk of adverse birth outcomes: evidence from a British cohort.  J Epidemiol Community Health 2014, pre-publication. doi:10.1136/jech-2013-202934

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 136:  Alcohol’s effects on cardiovascular risk among subjects with diabetes mellitus  –  18 March 2014

A U- or J-shaped curve for the relation of alcohol consumption to cardiovascular disease (CVD) among diabetics has been shown in most prospective epidemiologic studies for many years, and CVD is the leading cause of death among diabetics.  A variety of potential mechanisms of protection against CVD have been described, including beneficial effects of moderate drinking on lipids, inflammatory markers, and insulin resistance.   The current paper assesses the effects of alcohol use among participants in the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified-Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) trial.  It was based on more than 11,000 subjects with diabetes from 20 countries, including those in Eastern Europe, Asia, and established market economies in Western Europe, North America, and the Pacific region.  The outcomes over 5 years of follow up were CVD events (death from CVD, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke), microvascular disease (renal disease, diabetic eye disease), and all-cause mortality.  

Key results of the analyses showed that during follow up, more than 1,000 subjects (about 10%) had a major CVD, with similar percentages experiencing a microvascular complication or dying.   The authors report that “Compared with abstainers, any alcohol use was associated with a 17% lower risk of cardiovascular events, a 15% lower risk of microvascular complications, and a 13% lower risk of all-cause mortality.”  While there were few heavy drinkers (<4% of subjects), their data indicated that there was no significant lowering of risk of the outcomes among such subjects.  Subjects who consumed wine had lower estimates of cardiovascular disease outcomes and mortality than consumers of other beverages.

Forum reviewers considered this to be a well-done analysis based on a large cohort of subjects with diabetes mellitus, with an adequate number of non-drinkers to serve as a referent group.  The results strongly support previous studies that have shown a lower risk of cardiovascular events and total mortality among diabetic subjects who consume moderate alcohol.  The study also showed that the risks of microvascular complications (diabetic kidney disease, diabetic eye disease) were lower among moderate drinkers.

 The Forum considers this to be an important message (to physicians and the public), as the vascular ravages of diabetes are very serious, and diabetes is such a common disease that is increasing throughout the world.  Diabetic patients without contraindications to alcohol sorely need to know of the potential cardiovascular protection of moderate alcohol consumption.      

Reference:  Blomster JI, Zoungas S, Chalmers J, Li Q, Chow CK, Woodward M, Mancia G, Poulter N, Williams B, Harrap S, Neal B, Patel A, Hillis GS.  The relationship between alcohol consumption and vascular complications and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.  Diabetes Care 2014; pre-publication: DOI: 10.2337/dc13-2727

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here

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Critique 135:  Binge drinking greatly increases mortality risk among moderate drinkers  –  11 March 2014

This study was based on a sample of “late-middle-aged” (55-65 years old at baseline) community residents who were recruited from the western part of the United States to participate in a study of late-life alcohol consumption and drinking problems.  The present analyses evaluated   association between episodic heavy drinking and total mortality among 446 adults who were considered to be “moderate” drinkers.  The authors report that the 74 moderate drinkers who engaged in episodic heavy drinking (“binge drinking”) had more than two times higher odds of 20-year mortality than moderate drinkers who did not binge drink.

An association between binge drinking and health outcomes has been demonstrated in epidemiologic studies for decades.  Many (but not all) studies have shown an approximately two-fold increase in the risk of adverse outcomes for binge drinkers, in comparison with moderate drinkers who do not binge drink.  In reviewing the present study, Forum members commented on the small number of subjects (only 74 binge drinkers in the analysis), and some other analytic weaknesses (e.g., no data on potential changes in drinking habits over 20 years, inadequate control of some potential confounders, results not applicable to the general population as some subjects were recruited because of previous alcohol misuse).  Nevertheless, the results of the study support adverse effects on mortality of such a drinking pattern.

There are now considerable scientific data indicating harmful health effects of episodic excessive drinking in terms of coronary heart disease, other diseases of ageing, and mortality.  Simply knowing the average intake of subjects over a period of time is inadequate for classifying their alcohol consumption.  For middle-aged and older subjects the drinking pattern that has been shown to be associated with the most favorable health outcomes (including greater longevity of life) is regular, light-to-moderate intake, especially when the alcoholic beverage is consumed with food.   

Reference:  Holahan CJ, Schutte KK, Brennan PL, Holahan CK, Moos RH.  Episodic heavy drinking and 20-year total mortality among late-life moderate drinkers.  Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2014; pre-publication; DOI: 10.1111/acer.12381.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 134:  Comments on “Section 2.3, Alcohol Consumption,” from the “World Cancer Report 2014” issued by the World Health Organization –   11 February 2014

A recently released report by IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) of the World Health Organization, entitled World Cancer Report 2014,” includes a section on alcohol consumption as a factor in the etiology of cancer.  From reading this report, it is clear that the conclusion of the authors is that all alcohol consumption is harmful, regardless of the amount consumed, the type of beverage, or the pattern of drinking.  The members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research (the Forum) have real concerns about the WHO report. 

It appears that the authors have been very selective in choosing the data upon which they base their conclusions, often citing their own work and ignoring thousands of scientific articles relating alcohol consumption to cancer rates and mortality.  The report fails to discuss potential lower risks of cancer associated with polyphenols in wine and some other beverages.   It ignores the consistent finding in almost all prospective epidemiologic studies over many decades that total mortality rates are lower among light-to-moderate alcohol consumers (and recent evidence suggests that this may even be true among people with cancer).  

Members of the Forum strongly agree that heavy alcohol consumption and “binge” drinking are associated with many adverse effects (and would never be advised by responsible agencies).  However, the WHO report seriously undermines its credibility by publishing a report that seems to deliberately ignore overwhelming scientific evidence showing that light-to-moderate consumption of alcohol not only reduces overall mortality but is usually not associated with an increased risk of cancer. 

Excessive and binge drinking in young people is a growing scourge in many parts of the world, and alcohol consumption (especially in conjunction with smoking) clearly increases the risk of upper aero-digestive cancers; further, even moderate consumption is associated with a slight increase in the risk of breast cancer in women.  However, the scare tactics condemning all alcohol consumption in the WHO report tend to obscure those important messages. 

It is the opinion of our Forum that WHO, in the alcohol section of its new publication World Cancer Report 2014, has not provided an objective statement on alcohol and cancer based on current scientific data.  By doing so, WHO has lost credibility and, more importantly, has missed a key opportunity to convey important focused messages about alcohol and cancer that would be more likelty to improve the health of the public.

Reference:  Rehm J, Shield K.  Section 2.3, Alcohol Consumption, from World Cancer Report 2014, pp. 97-106, released 3 February 2014 by IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer), of the World Health Organization, available at https://www.dropbox.com/sh/1cdib9l04ahd04p/1rJYaiL1Kw.

 For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 133: Alcohol intake may lower the risk of developing multiple sclerosis  –  4 February 2014

Previous research has shown that alcohol consumption may be associated with a reduced risk of rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other autoimmune diseases.  There have also been reports that alcohol may lower the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS).  The authors of the present paper have used data from two large Swedish case-control studies of MS to evaluate the relation of alcohol consumption to MS.  Key results showed that in both of the case-control analyses, there was a dose-response inverse relation between alcohol consumption and the risk of developing MS.  In comparison with subjects reporting no alcohol intake in the 5- or 10-year period during which the diagnosis of MS was first made, subjects in the highest alcohol consumption group (> 112 g/week, about 9 drinks per week for women; >168 g/week, about  14 drinks per week for men) had 30% to 50% lower risk of developing MS.  A variety of potential confounders were included in the analysis, including smoking, education, and SES. 

Forum members who reviewed this paper all thought that it reflected a well-done analysis.  The main concerns were that, as are most studies of uncommon diseases, these were case-control comparisons (which may be associated with recall bias, reverse causation, and other potential confounding variables), and that the investigators could not determine if the “non-drinkers,” their referent group, were lifetime abstainers or former drinkers.  Also, while earlier research has shown that the polyphenols in wine may provide protection beyond that of alcohol in combating inflammation, there were no data on beverage-specific results. 

In general, however, Forum members welcomed this contribution to our knowledge on the subject, and thought that the authors did a good job in discussing the strengths and weaknesses of their study.  There was a brief discussion of potential mechanisms by which alcoholic beverages could lower the risk of MS, but no discussion of the potential added effects related to polyphenolic substances.  Forum members also thought that serum uric acid (which may increase with alcohol consumption) could play a role in an autoimmune disease, but this was not discussed by the authors.   

Based on previous research and the results of this paper, it is probable that moderate alcohol intake, especially of wine, may lower the risk of developing MS, a neurological disease for which no cure is currently available.  While MS is too uncommon a condition to use these findings to recommend alcohol consumption for the prevention of the disease, it would be useful if future research could help determine if, for subjects who already have MS, moderate drinking may affect the progression of their disease.

Reference:  Hedström AK, Hillert J, Olsson T, Alfredsson L.  Alcohol as a modifiable lifestyle factor affecting multiple sclerosis risk.  JAMA Neurology 2014; doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.5858; published online January 6, 2014.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 132:  Pattern of alcohol consumption and cause of death in a large European prospective study  –  21 January 2014

A large group of investigators participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study have reported on the association of alcohol consumption with disease-specific mortality over a 12-year period among a very large number of men and women.  Alcohol intake over the past year (as well as estimates of earlier intake) was reported at baseline.  A variety of approaches were used to identify deaths in the participating cohorts, but validation of the cause of death was not possible.  No data were reported on certain key aspects of drinking pattern (frequency of alcohol intake, binge drinking, with meals, etc.) and beverage-specific effects were not reported. 

The authors report that the risk of death from cardiovascular diseases was lower, and from cancer and certain other causes of death were higher, among drinkers than among their referent group of “lifetime light users” (men reporting ≤1 drink/week and women reporting ≤ 0.5 drinks/week).  However, their graphs of alcohol intake and risk of total mortality (not included in the paper but in supplementary data they provide on the internet) show strong J-shaped curves for increasing alcohol intake for both men and women.  For men, the risk among alcohol consumers of up to about 48 gr/day (the equivalent of approximately four “typical drinks”) was lower than that of the lifetime light users that made up the referent group; at higher intake, the risk increased above that of light drinkers.  For women, the risk of total mortality for drinkers remained lower than that of the referent group at all reported levels of intake.  Despite these findings, the entire paper focuses only on the increased risk of death from alcohol for certain diseases, and almost completely ignores the net, overall effects on total mortality.

Forum reviewers considered that while the analyses were done correctly, there were major weaknesses in the estimation of “lifetime alcohol intake,” no data on the pattern of intake, no validation of coexisting diseases and, especially, no validation of the specific cause of death, even though this was the primary outcome of the study.  All of these factors weaken the strong assertions made by the authors in their conclusions. 

Forum members were concerned that the authors seemed to obscure the total effects of light-to-moderate drinking (lower risk of all-cause mortality), and emphasize only the harmful effects.  Some reviewers considered that the presentation appeared to be based more on ideology than on an unbiased assessment of the data, and one suggested that the paper appears to have been written starting from pre-conceived conclusions, then finding data to support them.

It is interesting that two Commentaries published with this article came to divergent views.  One by Stockwell and Chikritzhs emphasized potential bias and confounding that cause concern when relating alcohol to mortality in observational studies.  While they then pointed out how well the present authors adjusted for many of these factors, they nevertheless concluded their commentary repeating how such factors are difficult to control and stating that “ . . . a healthy dose of skepticism is warranted for the hypothesis that light/moderate alcohol consumption is beneficial to health.”  (They do not mention that data on alcohol and mortality are far more robust that data supporting generally accepted beliefs of the beneficial effects of physical exercise, eating a healthy diet, maintaining a lean body mass, etc.) 

On the other hand, the commentary on the present paper by Banks considered the data presented  quite sound, and concluded: “If taken as causal, these findings are consistent with most public health advice about alcohol, except that most advice recommends an upper limit to alcohol consumption, but does not actually encourage drinking.  In fact, the evidence goes further than this and indicates that, in later life, on average and bearing in mind the priorities and risks of specific individuals, drinking at least some alcohol, but not too much, is likely to minimize the overall risk of death.” 

Reference: Bergmann MM, Rehm J, Klipstein-Grobusch K, et al (38 authors).  The association of pattern of lifetime alcohol use and cause of death in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.  Int J Epidemiol 2013;42:1772-1790

Attached Commentaries:

Banks E.  Commentary: Lifetime alcohol consumption and mortality: have some, but not too much. Int J Epidemiol 2013;42:1790–1792; doi:10.1093/ije/dyt218

Stockwell T, Chikritzhs T.  Commentary: Another serious challenge to the hypothesis that moderate drinking is good for health?  Int J Epidemiol 2013;42:1792–1794; doi:10.1093/ije/dyt217

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 131:  Effects of alcohol consumption on the risk of gout  –  23 December 2013

A new meta-analysis has been conducted to assess the effects of alcohol consumption on the risk of gout.  A total of 12 articles with 17 studies involving 42,924 cases met the inclusion criteria.  The authors report that the pooled RRs for light (≤1 drink/day), moderate (>1 to <3 drinks/day), and heavy drinking (≥3 drinks/day) vs. non/occasional alcohol drinking were 1.16 (95 % CI, 1.07–1.25), 1.58 (95 % CI, 1.50–1.66), and 2.64 (95 % CI, 2.26–3.09), respectively.  The results suggested that alcohol consumption might be associated with increased risk of gout.

Forum reviewers agreed that the analytic methodology in this paper was appropriate.  Considerable research has shown that alcohol intake, especially heavier drinking, increases serum uric acid levels and the risk of gout.  There remain some questions about the relation of wine consumption with gout, and the present study did not have data to test beverage-specific responses. 

Overall, data suggest that alcohol intake, especially heavier drinking, raises serum uric acid levels and may trigger an acute attack in persons with gout, especially those who are not controlling their disease with appropriate medication.  A number of studies, including the present one, suggest that even light alcohol intake may increase the risk of developing gout.  In any case, the risk appears to be rather low with light drinking, a level of alcohol intake that should reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.  Also, some studies suggest that the risk is lower for the consumption of wine than for the consumption of other beverages containing alcohol.

Reference: Wang M, Jiang X, Wu W, Zhang D.  A meta-analysis of alcohol consumption and the risk of gout.  Clin Rheumatol 2013;32:1641–1648.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 130:  How alcohol consumption may interact with genetic factors that relate to health and disease  –  10December 2013

Despite extensive research over the past few decades, our knowledge about the genes that underlie most chronic diseases remains incomplete.  For example, even for alcohol-related diseases, it is not possible at present to determine how an individual person will respond over a lifetime to varying amounts of alcohol intake: not all heavy drinkers develop cirrhosis; not all moderate drinkers lower their risk of cardiovascular disease.  While the underlying genetic pattern of a person undoubtedly plays a role in his/her health outcomes, environmental factors, including alcohol consumption, may modify the effects of genes.  The modification of the effects of genes by environmental factors, such as alcohol intake, can be referred to as “epigenetics.”

A new paper on epigenetics, by a leading scientist who has worked at the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) for many years, provides important new insight into mechanisms by which alcohol intake, especially heavy consumption, may modify the activity of genes affecting health.  Dr. Zakhari describes specific effects that heavy alcohol intake can have on the activities of enzymes involved in epigenetic modifications.  In some cases, alcohol enhances genetically determined effects, in others it suppresses such activity.  As stated by the author, “Metabolites, including those generated during ethanol metabolism, can impact disease states by binding to transcription factors and/or modifying chromatin structure, thereby altering gene expression patterns.”

Forum members consider this to be a very well-thought-out and well-done presentation of important new data.  They agree with the author that these observations could help researchers to design model medications to treat or at least ameliorate alcohol-related organ damage, such as cirrhosis of the liver and alcohol-related cancers.  While reviewers consider that these observations are important in our understanding of how alcohol affects health, they point out that they must be tested in further research, especially epidemiologic studies, to evaluate the extent that such interations between alcohol and genes actually affect health outcomes.  Key problems that limit our ability to determine causality of disease from epidemiologic studies include not knowing the underlying genetic susceptibility of individual subjects and, as pointed out in the present paper, not accounting for environmental factors that may modify such genetic effects.

Reference:  Zakhari S.  Alcohol metabolism and epigenetics changes.  Alcohol Research: Current Reviews 2013;35:9-16.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 129:  Association of alcohol consumption with skin cancer; A report from the Women’s Health Initiative  –  20 November 2013

A report from more than 59,000 women in the Women’s Health Initiative related reported alcohol consumption to the risk of melanoma (MM) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC).  This was a fairly large study, with 532 cases of melanoma and 9,593 cases of NMSC occurring over approximately 10 years of follow up.  The key reported results were for a higher hazard of MM (HR 1.64) and NMSC (OR 1.23) for drinkers of 7 or more drinks/week, compared with non-drinkers.  Lifetime alcohol consumption was also positively associated with hazard of MM and risk of NMSC, with the only significant increases for MM according to type of beverage being seen for women with a preference for white wine or liquor.  As shown in many previous studies, the risk of these skin cancers was lower among smokers than among non-smokers.

Forum reviewers thought that this was a very well-done analysis.  They did note that there were large decreases in the estimates of HRs related to alcohol consumption when adjustments were made for sun exposure and other known confounders.  For example, the HR for MM decreased for total wine from 1.30 to 1.06 when adjusted; for red wine:1.71 to 1.34; for white wine: 1.93 to 1.52; for liquor: 1.87 to 1.65; for beer: 1.34 to 1.18.  The magnitude of these changes, as well as the very different baseline characteristics of the women according to their drinking habits, raises the possibility that there may be residual confounding affecting the results.  In addition, reviewer Zhang points out that by including subjects with these skin cancers prior to baseline in their main analyses, there could be a problems with bias in their results.

Forum member Klatsky has recently reported on this topic using several decades of follow-up data from the Kaiser-Permanente study, with more than 300,000 subjects and more than 1,000 cases of MM.  In that study, he and his colleagues found that among persons preferring wine, the HR for MM at 3+ drinks per day was 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.5), while it was 1.2, 1.3, and 1.1 in persons with preference for liquor, beer, and no beverage type.  However, at 1-2 drinks per day, wine drinkers had a HR of 0.9.  Klatsky states  “So maybe too much should not be made of the beverage type data in these analyses.  However, the association with alcohol seems statistically solid.”

A previous study by Mukamal, with data from 300,000 subjects participating in a risk factor surveillance survey reports: “Approximately 33.5% of respondents reported a sunburn within the past year.  Heavier average alcohol use and binge drinking were both positively associated with prevalence and number of sunburns within the past year.  The adjusted odds ratios for prevalence and number of sunburns among binge drinkers were 1.39 (1.31-1.48) and 1.29 (1.20-1.38), respectively.”  Klatsky wonders whether “possible confounding by sun is not only an artifact of SES and tropical vacations, but whether heavy imbibers at the beach may fall asleep when exposed or simply do not notice their sunburn until it is severe.”  Other Forum reviewers also worry that there may be residual confounding in the present study from sun and ultraviolet exposure.

Klatsky adds: “However, even if the alcohol-melanoma association is due to confounding by sun exposure, the same explanation seems less plausible for the inverse association between smoking and melanoma.  While there is obviously no public health utility in any ‘protective’ effects of smoking, that association is scientifically interesting and could be a clue to mechanisms.”

The bottom line is that there are considerable observational epidemiologic data suggesting that alcohol consumption may relate to an increase in the risk of MM and NMSCs.  As mechanisms are not known, there is still concern that much of this relation may relate to residual confounding by ultraviolet sun exposure, the most important environmental factor for these diseases.

Rerference:  Kubo JT, Henderson MT, Desai M, Wactawski-Wende J, Stefanick ML, Tang JY.  Alcohol consumption and risk of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative.  Cancer Causes Control 2013 (pre-publication) DOI 10.1007/s10552-013-0280-3

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

 

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Critique 128:  Little effect of alcohol consumption on breast cancer risk found among African-American women  –  14 November 2013

Alcohol is known to be a risk factor for breast cancer in Caucasian women, but the evidence in African-American (AA) women is limited and results from previous studies are inconclusive.  The present case-control study, based on 803 cases of breast cancer among African American women in the northeastern part of the USA, evaluated associations between recent and lifetime drinking and breast cancer risk.  The authors report that there was no association between recent drinking and breast cancer risk, even when stratified by menopausal status or by hormone receptor status.  Further, their analyses suggested a slight decrease in cancer risk with alcohol consumption among women who drank when under 20 years of age (OR = 0.65; 95% CI: 0.47–0.89), regardless of menopausal or hormone receptor status.

Forum reviewers point out that this was a case-control study of breast cancer, which always presents an opportunity for recall bias, and the number of cases was not large.  Further, AA women generally drink very little, so it may be difficult to determine if larger amounts of alcohol may increase breast cancer risk.

On the other hand, the results were based on a very well-done and complete analysis, with appropriate control for known risk factors, similar results were obtained when recent (in last year) alcohol intake and long-term alcohol consumption were considered, and their finding of increased risk of breast cancer among subjects with a family history of breast cancer, a personal history of benign breast disease, and HRT use strengthen the results.

The results of this study are consistent with those from many previous studies showing little effect of alcohol consumption on breast cancer risk among AA women.  However, given that few AA women in the USA drink alcohol, and those that do typically consume only small amounts, the study cannot estimate the potential effect on breast cancer among heavier drinkers.  Further, Forum members believed that the decrease in the risk of breast cancer found in this study for drinking early in life (before age 20 years) may be due to residual confounding by socio-economic factors.

Overall, the present study supports previous research suggesting that the light alcohol consumption typically seen among AA women in the USA is not an important factor in their risk of breast cancer.  On the other hand, this paper reports similar null results between alcohol and cancer risk among Caucasian women in their study.  Current data do not necessarily indicate that there are ethnic differences in alcohol metabolism that may lead to differences between Caucasian and AA women in the association of alcohol consumption with breast cancer, and this study alone cannot be used to support such a premise.

Reference:  Chandran U, Zirpoli G, Ciupak G, McCann SE, Gong Z, Pawlish K, Lin Y, Demissie K, Ambrosone CB, Bandera EV.  Does alcohol increase breast cancer risk in African-American women?  Findings from a case–control study.  British J Cancer 2013;109:1945–1953 | doi: 10.1038/bjc.2013.513.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 127:  Estimation of alcohol-attributable and alcohol-preventable mortality in Denmark  —  6 November 2013

In an attempt to judge the harmful and beneficial health effects related to alcohol consumption, Danish scientists have carried out analyses comparing alcohol-attributable and alcohol-preventable mortality in Denmark.  They have used estimates of the potentially harmful effects of alcohol use on more than 20 diseases, giving 100% values to “alcohol use disorders,” although the specific causes of death are not known for this category.  Most of the other attributions for harm are realistic, but the alcohol preventable attributions for diabetes and ischemic heart disease appear to be low.  The authors conclude that 5.0% of deaths among women and 9.5% of deaths among men were attributable to alcohol in Denmark in 2010, with the majority of all alcohol-attributable deaths caused by high consumption.  They attribute only between 2 and 3% of deaths to be preventable by alcohol.

Previous estimates of alcohol-attributable and alcohol-preventable effects have varied widely, emphasizing the importance of the assumptions made by the investigators in any set of analyses.  For example, an analysis of deaths in Germany by Konnopka et al (Konnopka A, Hans-Helmut König H-H.  The health and economic consequences of moderate alcohol consumption in Germany 2002.  Value in Health 2009;12:253-261) concluded that there were more alcohol-preventable deaths than alcohol-attributable deaths and a report from the UK also estimated much lower rates for alcohol-attributable deaths (White IR, Altmann DR, Nanchahal K. Mortality in England and Wales attributable to any drinking, drinking above sensible limits and drinking above lowest-risk level. Addiction 2004;99:749–756).  Further, a previous report that included data for Denmark gave very different results for net alcohol effects, estimating that less than 1% of deaths were attributable to alcohol (Britton A, Nolte E, White IR, Gronbaek M, Powles J, Cavallo F, McPherson K.  A comparison of the alcohol-attributable mortality in four European countries. Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18:643–51).  It is probable that different underlying assumptions of alcohol effects on various diseases are the prime reason for such differences.

There is no question that heavy alcohol consumption contributes to a large number of disease conditions, and the findings of this study emphasize the magnitude of the problem.  On the other hand, if the potentially beneficial effects of moderate alcohol consumption on many common diseases are underestimated, a net unfavorable result, as in the present study, is unavoidable.  It will be interesting to see what assumptions are made in other studies such as this, and how such assumptions affect the outcome of analyses.

Reference:  Eliasen M, Becker U, Grønbæk M, Juel K, Tolstrup JS.  Alcohol-attributable and alcohol-preventable mortality in Denmark: an analysis of which intake levels contribute most to alcohol’s harmful and beneficial effects.  Eur J Epidemiol 2013; DOI 10.1007/s10654-013-9855-2

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 126:  Moderate alcohol intake may lower the risk of rheumatoid arthritis  –  11 October 2013

Moderate alcohol intake, compared with abstinence, has been related to lower inflammatory markers and a reduced risk of many auto-immune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus, autoimmure diabetes, and Graves hyperthyroidism.  The present large meta-analysis relating alcohol to RA includes data from 5 prospective cohort studies and 3 nested case-control studies.  Their analyses are based on prospective data from a total of almost 200,000 subjects, among whom 1,878 developed RA.

This meta-analysis concludes that low to moderate alcohol consumption is inversely associated with the development of RA.  It suggests a “J-shaped” curve, with a lowered risk for an average intake of up to 15 g of alcohol (about 1 to 1 ½ typical drinks), in comparison with non-drinkers, and an increased risk for heavier drinking.   While the immediate effects were greater for women in this study, for long-term effects the authors noted that “Regardless of sex, a consistent low to moderate alcohol consumption for a period of at least 10 years was found to have a 17% reduction in RA risk.”

Beneficial effects of alcohol on indices of inflammation have been shown repeatedly.  The probable mechanism of alcohol’s effect on the risk of RA is down regulation of the immune response and a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines.

Reference:  Jin Z, Xiang C, Cai Q, Wei X, He J.  Alcohol consumption as a preventive factor for developing rheumatoid arthritis: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.  Ann Rheum 2013.  doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-203323

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 125:  Effects of alcohol consumption on risk of colorectal cancer; potential modification by folate intake  –  25 September 2013

Many epidemiologic studies have shown a small increase in the risk of breast cancer and colorectal cancer to be associated with alcohol consumption.  Some have found that higher intakes of folic acid may attenuate such an increase in risk.  The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of alcohol consumption on the risk of colorectal cancer according to folic acid fortification period in the United States.  The relation of alcohol intake to colorectal cancer in two prospective studies (the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study) was compared for a prefortification period (before 1998) with such risk estimates during the postfortification period, which began in 1998.  A total of 2,793 cases of invasive colorectal cancer were documented.

The authors concluded that their data support an increase in colorectal cancer with high alcohol intake, and suggest that the risk may be lower in the postfortification period due to a higher folate intake in the US population.  Forum reviewers had some concerns about these conclusions, as they point out that no dose-response relation between alcohol and colorectal cancer was shown in either period, and in data since 1998 no significant relation is seen between alcohol and such cancers.  In fact, the authors of the present study state: “We also examined drinking pattern in relation to colorectal cancer risk; neither frequency of drinking nor quantity of drinking was associated with the risk of colorectal cancer;” they do not report their data upon which that statement is based.

Overall, the present paper does not answer the question as to the extent to which alcohol may relate to the risk of colorectal cancer, or if folate intake may modify any relation that may exist.  Given that colorectal cancer (and breast cancer in women) are so common, it is important to evaluate how dietary folate and other nutrients may relate to such cancers.  Further research on the relation of alcohol to these cancers, and potentially modifying factors, is greatly needed.

Reference: Nan H, Lee JE,  Rimm EB, Fuchs CS, Giovannucci EL, Cho E.  Prospective study of alcohol consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer before and after folic acid fortification in the United States.  Annals of Epidemiology 2013;23:558-563.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 124:  The J-shaped curve for the relation of alcohol consumption to mortality  –  17 September 2013

An analysis based on data from more than 110,000 subjects in the USA, of whom 3,364 died during a follow-up period of up to 9 years, was used to evaluate the relation of “heavy drinking” and “nonheavy drinking” to the risk of all-cause mortality.  The authors defined heavy drinking as 5 or more drinks/occasion, and recorded the frequency in which subjects consumed such amounts.  Subjects consuming < 5 drinks/occasion were classified as nonheavy drinkers.

The key findings of the analyses were that there was a positive and linear increase in risk of mortality for subjects consuming heavy amounts of alcohol, with the risk increasing as drinking at this level was more frequent.  For nonheavy drinkers, there was a J-shaped relation with mortality.  The point at which the nonheavy drinkers’ risk of mortality exceeded that of abstainers was between 4 and 5 drinking occasions/week.

Forum reviewers thought that this was a well-done analysis that emphasizes the importance of the pattern of drinking, and not just the average weekly intake.  Although the upper limits of drinks/occasion exceeded that usually considered as “moderate,” a J-shaped curve between alcohol and mortality for these drinkers was demonstrated.  This is the pattern usually seen in prospective epidemiologic studies when “moderate” is defined at somewhat lower levels of alcohol intake.

Forum reviewers agreed with the conclusions of the authors regarding the importance of considering the pattern of drinking when evaluating the health effects of alcohol.  The authors concluded: “Promoting less harmful drinking patterns by reducing heavy drinking frequency is an appropriate harm reduction strategy, and assessing drinking pattern by determining the frequency of heavy and nonheavy drinking is a simple and fast way to determine risk and promote less risky drinking behavior.”

Reference:  Plunk AD, Syed-Mohammed H, Cavazos-Rehg P, Bierut LJ, Grucza RA.  Alcohol consumption, heavy drinking, and mortality: Rethinking the J-shaped curve.  Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2013;pre-publication: DOI: 10.1111/acer.12250

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 123:  Alcohol consumption and lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms  –  5 September 2013

Many prospective studies have shown that moderate drinkers are at lower risk of certain types of lymphoid cancer.  For example, a report in 2009 from the Million Women’s Study in the UK found that alcohol consumption showed a significant inverse association with the occurrence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).  Further, a 2012 paper from that study based on 9,162 incident cases of haematological malignancy, including 7,047 lymphoid and 2,072 myeloid cancers, concluded: “Among predominantly moderate alcohol drinkers, higher intake was associated with lower risk of lymphoid malignancies.”  Those investigators did not find a significant effect  of alcohol on the risk of myeloid tumors, such as acute myeloid leukemia.  Another 2012 paper based on almost 2,000 cases of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma concluded: “In summary, findings from the prospective study presented here support the hypothesis that alcohol intake might be associated with a reduced risk of NHL.”

The authors of the present paper from the Netherlands, based on 17.3 years of follow up with 1,375 cases of lymphoid and 245 cases of myeloid neoplasms, did not find a statistically significant reduction in the risk of lymphoid cancers, and the authors suggest: “If any association between alcohol consumption and lymphoid neoplasms exists, our study suggests an increased risk rather than a decreased risk.”

While reasons for this difference in results of this study when compared with other recent studies may be used to better understand the association between alcohol and such cancers, Forum reviewers were concerned about a number of aspects of this study.  For example, the authors had data on alcohol consumption only at baseline for this very long (17+ year) follow up, so changes (either increases or decreases in intake) were not known.  Further, the key relations reported were not adjusted for a large number of potentially confounding variables, such as a positive family history of hematological cancer.  (The authors state that they carried out such multivariable analyses but do not present the data.)  Of even more concern was the apparent inverse effect of alcohol on cancer risk for a number of types of tumors when dose-response relations were shown.

Given the rather consistent findings in other very large studies of hematological malignancies that the risk of many types of lymphoid cancer may be reduced by alcohol, and inconsistencies in the results of the present analyses, it is difficult to conclude that the present paper should change our current interpretation of the association between alcohol and these types of cancer.

Forum members look forward to reports from other prospective studies on this topic.   For the present, however, the overwhelming scientific evidence suggests that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a decrease in the risk of many types of lymphoid malignancies, but has little effect on myeloid cancers.

Reference:  Heinen MM, Verhage BAJ, Schouten LJ, Goldbohm RA, Schouten HC, van den Brandt PA.  Alcohol consumption and risk of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms: Results of the Netherlands cohort study.  Int J Cancer 2013l133:1701–1713.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 122:  Does moderate wine consumption lower the risk of developing depression? –  3 September 2013

There is a large literature relating heavy alcohol consumption to depression: most studies show that heavy drinkers tend to be depressed, and depressed people may self-medicate with large amounts of alcohol.  This large prospective study of subjects at high risk of cardiovascular disease has shown that “moderate” drinkers, especially wine drinkers (the majority of their subjects), were at lower risk of developing depression during 7 years of follow up than were non-drinkers.  An important aspect of this study is indeed that the analyses were based on moderate drinkers, as people exceeding certain amounts of alcohol or testing positive on the CAGE questionnaire (a measure of alcohol misuse) were excluded.

Strengths of the study include it being a large prospective study, with more than 5,000 subjects, aged 55-80 years at baseline, who were followed for up to 7 years for the initial development of clinical depression (which was diagnosed in 443 instances).  Especially important was the ability of the investigators to have repeated assessments of alcohol consumption, every two years.  A rather complete list of potentially confounding variables was available.  The key findings of the study were that subjects reporting  >5-15 grams/day of total alcohol intake, and wine drinkers of 2-7 drinks/week, were at a lower risk of developing depression than were non drinkers.

Some Forum members remained concerned that there may have been residual confounding by other lifestyle habits, and that the results may apply primarily to subjects who are also following a Mediterranean-type diet and lifestyle.  Also, data were not available to evaluate the relation of heavy drinking or alcoholism to depression.  However, the authors provide good scientific support for their conclusions that subjects reporting  >5-15 grams/day of total alcohol intake (from about ½ to 1 ½ of a typical drink), and wine drinkers of 2-7 drinks/week, are at approximately 30% lower risk of developing depression than are abstainers of alcohol.

Reference:  Gea A, Beunza JJ, Estruch R, et al (17 authors).  Alcohol intake, wine consumption and the development of depression: the PREDIMED study.  BMC Medicine 2013.  Advanced publication, released 29 August 2013.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 121:  Differences between wine and other alcoholic beverages in terms of adverse consequences of alcohol consumption  –  22 August 2013

Questionnaire-based data on alcohol consumption were collected from more than 5,000 military recruits in Switzerland, who had a mean age of just over 19 years.  There were very few drinkers who averaged more than 21 drinks/week, so the emphasis was on the effects of what is usually referred to as “binge drinking,” defined in this study as the consumption of 6 or more typical drinks (a drink containing 10-12 g of alcohol) on a single occasion.  The “preference” of one particular type of beverage was based on the subject indicating that it made up more than two-thirds of his total alcohol consumption.  The specific type of beverage preferred — beer, wine, or “other beverages” (the latter including apertifs, “pops,” chillers, and coolers) — was related to the pattern of drinking (frequency of binge drinking) and to the reported occurrence of adverse alcohol-related consequences (e.g., blackouts, driving after heavy drinking, missing work due to drinking, accidents, unprotected sex, encounters with police).

The authors report: “Preference for beer was associated with risky drinking patterns and, comparable with a preference for strong alcohol, with the use of illicit substances (cannabis and other illicit drugs).  In contrast, a preference for wine was associated with low-risk alcohol consumption and a reduced likelihood of experiencing at least four negative alcohol-related consequences or of daily cigarette smoking.”  More frequent binge drinking of any beverage was strongly associated with an increase in adverse alcohol-related consequences.

Forum reviewers thought that the adverse outcomes, especially those related to heavy beer intake, tend to characterize a particular subculture that demonstrates problematic substance use due to personal characteristics of the subjects.  The unhealthy outcomes may be a feature more of the cultural habits of the subjects rather than just due to the type of beverage they consume most frequently.

The authors conclude that strategies for preventing problems with alcohol abuse should attempt to reduce excessive drinking of all types of beverages.  However, they add: “to lessen the additional negative effects of beer and strong alcohol, which are particularly cheap in Switzerland, targeted strategies such as minimum pricing policies for these beverage types should be considered.”  Forum members think that the extent to which such beverage-specific price restructuring would decrease unhealthy drinking practices among young people remains unclear.

Reference:  Dey M, Gmel G, Studer J, Dermota P, Mohler-Kuo M.  Beverage preferences and associated drinking patterns, consequences and other substance use behaviours.  European Journal of Public Health 2013; advance access; doi:10.1093/eurpub/ckt109

For the full critique of this critique by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 120:  Binge drinking impairs endothelial function in young people  –  20 August 2013

The function of the vascular endothelium is a key process in the development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, and extensive studies among middle-aged and elderly adults generally show beneficial effects of moderate drinking on vascular function.  Whether or not alcohol consumption among young people has any lasting biological effects on cardiovascular risk is unclear: risk factors tend to track from childhood into adulthood, but specific long-lasting effects related only to drinking in young people are not known.  Hence, data are currently not available to answer the question as to when during life people might consider beginning the moderate consumption of alcohol for the potential lowering of cardiovascular risk later in life.

The present study does not answer that question, as it only compares abstaining young people with binge drinkers, with the latter being defined as subjects reporting that they consumed ≥ 5 drinks in 2 hours for males, and ≥ 4 drinks in 2 hours for females.  (The average number of binge-drinking episodes for these subjects was 6 ± 1 within the past month.)   It does not compare abstainers with moderate drinkers.  However, the paper does show that binge drinking among 18 – 25 year olds has adverse effects on endothelial function.

Forum reviewers were pleased to see this study, but point out that it is a cross-sectional analysis, and only compares binge drinkers with non-drinking young people.  Further, inadequate data are presented to know the degree to which the results of the study may suffer from residual confounding from other factors.

The authors conclude that their study showed adverse effects on both microvascular and macrovascular function to be associated with frequent binge drinking in young people.  It is hoped that these investigators, or others, will in the future provide data on the effects on vascular  function of regular, moderate alcohol consumption among young people.  It would also be interesting to learn if effects are different for high-polyphenol wine than for other beverages.  Further, it will be important to determine how long beneficial or adverse effects on vascular function may persist, with or without continued alcohol intake.

Reference:  Goslawski M, Piano MR, Bian J-T, Church EC, Szczurek M, Phillips SA.  Binge drinking impairs vascular function in young adults. J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;62:201–207.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 119:  A consensus statement on the association of moderate alcohol consumption and health   —   13 August 2013

A group of Italian scientists has prepared a consensus paper to review the available evidence on the association between moderate alcohol use and health and disease.  The report resulted from extensive discussions among 36 prominent Italian scientists, and provides a working document for the scientific and health professional communities.  The report has been signed by 19 separate societies or federations in Italy, including societies in nutrition, cardiology, and general medicine, as well as organizations of scientists dealing with diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.

The consensus report ends with four conclusions:

“(1)  In healthy adults and in the elderly, spontaneous consumption of alcoholic beverages within 30 g ethanol/d for men and 15 g/d for women is to be considered acceptable and do not deserve intervention by the primary care physician or the health professional in charge.  In fact, there is no evidence to suggest complete abstention from alcohol drinking by moderate users.

(2)  Patients with increased risk for specific diseases, for example women with familiar history of breast cancer, or subjects with familiar history of early CVD or cardiovascular patients should discuss their drinking habits with their physician.

(3)  No abstainer should be advised to drink for health reasons.

(4)  Alcohol use must be discouraged in specific physiological or personal situations or in selected age classes (children and adolescents, pregnant and lactating women and recovering alcoholics).  Moreover, the possible interactions between alcohol and acute or chronic drug use must be discussed with the primary care physician.”

Forum reviewers considered this to be a well-done and generally well-balanced appraisal of the current literature on alcohol and health; it could help inform physicians and the general public about our current knowledge on this topic.  However, Forum reviewers were concerned by several aspects of the report where it appeared that the conclusions were more “political” than “scientific” (perhaps necessary to gain the support of all of the societies endorsing the report).

The authors of the report provided good data to support their first two conclusions, and recent publications that were not available to the authors at the time they prepared their report strongly support these conclusions.  However, Forum members found little data provided in the paper to support the third statement in their summary; in fact, the information the authors presented in the text would tend to support the opposite conclusion.  Further, while it may be correct, their fourth conclusion was not supported by scientific data in the paper.

Forum members agreed that the importance of the effects of alcohol consumption on total mortality must always be considered, and agreed with the statement of the authors that “Low levels of alcohol intake (1-2 drinks per day for women and 2-4 drinks per day for men) are inversely associated with total mortality in both men and women.”

Key areas that the Forum believed could have been given more emphasis related to the association between alcohol and diabetes mellitus, where data strongly support an approximately 30% lower risk for moderate drinkers, in comparison with non-drinkers.  And the risk of cardiovascular disease is considerably reduced among diabetics who consume alcohol moderately.  And the potential effects of moderate drinking on reducing the risk of congestive heart failure, a rapidly increasing health problem related to ageing of the population, were not discussed.  Forum members also wished that more emphasis had been given in the consensus report to the pattern of drinking: current data indicate that regular moderate drinking, rather than binge drinking, is the pattern associated with the most favorable health outcomes.

Overall, this consensus report is an important and useful addition to the scientific literature on the relation of moderate alcohol consumption to a variety of health outcomes.  It could be of great values to physicians and policy makers when providing advice to the public regarding the effects of alcohol on health.

Reference:  Poli A, Marangoni F, Avogaro A . . . de Gaetano G . . . et al (total of 36 authors).  Moderate alcohol use and health: A consensus document.  Nutrition, Metabolism, & Cardiovasular Disease 2013;23:487-504.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 118:  Clustering of alcohol consumption with socioeconomic and biologic risk factors for cancer –  30 July 2013

It has been shown in most previous studies that moderate drinkers, especially those who generally consume wine, tend to have other “moderate” lifestyle factors.  For example, they tend to be better educated, of higher socio-economic status, and generally are more active and eat a healthier diet than non-drinkers.  An exception is cigarette smoking, which tends to be more common in drinkers than in abstainers.  Epidemiologists studying alcohol and health are always striving to adjust appropriately for other lifestyle factors, attempting to assure that the difference in health outcomes among subjects relates to their drinking, and not to associated lifestyle factors.

In the present study, the investigators related alcohol  consumption to a large number of socio-demographic and lifestyle factors that relate to the risk of cancer.  They report that several factors were associated with alcohol consumption ≥10g/d in both genders: older age, smoking, higher socio-demographic category, higher income, and less healthy dietary intakes.  Other factors were associated with alcohol consumption differently for men and women.  The authors then report that the total number of such factors was higher among consumers of ≥10g/d of alcohol than among abstainers or lighter drinkers.  They conclude: “The multiplicity of deleterious lifestyle behaviours combined with alcohol drinking must be taken into account in cancer prevention efforts.  Gender-specific medical advice for people with personal or family history of alcohol-related diseases, including cancer, should be strengthened.”

While Forum reviewers found the data presented in this paper to be of interest, they did not believe that simply adding up all adverse risk factors provided useful information for the prevention of cancer.  It is well known that smoking is a major risk factor for certain cancers, and in almost all studies alcohol consumers are more likely to be smokers; hence, drinkers should certainly be advised about the dangers of smoking.  On the other hand, by simply summing the number of factors into a total score, the authors included a number of risk factors for which there is less of a scientific basis for their effect on cancer risk (e.g, the intake of supplements).  Such factors should not be given the same weight as smoking as risk factors for cancer.  Further, this study was carried out among computer-literate volunteers, so it may have limited relevance for the general population.

There have been extensive data showing that “healthy” and “unhealthy” lifestyle factors tend to cluster: for example, light-to-moderate drinkers tend to be leaner and eat a healthier diet than non-drinkers or heavy drinkers, as shown in this study.  However, the prevention of chronic diseases relates to a large number of behaviors, and alcohol consumption cannot be considered as an isolated factor.  Current epidemiologic data suggest that the combination of not smoking, being physically active, eating a healthy diet, avoiding obesity, and, unless contraindicated, regularly consuming small amounts of an alcoholic beverage, together make up what can be defined as a “healthy lifestyle.”

Reference:  Touvier M, Druesne-Pecollo N, Kesse-Guyot E, Andreeva VA, Galan P, Hercberg S, Latino-Martel P.  Demographic, socioeconomic, disease history, dietary and lifestyle cancer risk factors associated with alcohol consumption.  Int J Cancer 2013;in press

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 117:  Changes in alcohol intake modify levels of fibrinogen, an important risk factor for coronary heart disease  –  18 July 2013

A prospective analysis of data from 2,520 subjects in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA) cohort related reported alcohol intake at two examinations, 13 years apart, to levels of fibrinogen on the two occasions.  Fibrinogen is a strong determinant of thrombosis, and is an important risk factor for coronary heart disease.  The authors report that, in comparison with participants who never drank, those who became/stayed drinkers had smaller increases in fibrinogen, while those who quit drinking had the highest increase in fibrinogen over 13 years of follow-up.  They conclude that increases in fibrinogen may be a key mechanism for the established protective effect of moderate alcohol intake on cardiovascular disease outcomes.

Forum reviewers considered this to be a potentially important paper, as the finding of higher fibrinogen among never drinkers and those who quit drinking may relate to the higher risk of coronary disease commonly reported from such subjects in prospective studies.  However, the reviewers point out that the reasons that subjects quit drinking are not known (although the authors did adjust for conditions related to quitting drinking).  Further, blood clotting factors other than fibrinogen may be affected by changes in alcohol consumption, and they were not reported in this paper.  More research will be needed to determine if changes in fibrinogen levels are key elements in alcohol’s effects on cardiovascular disease.

Reference:  Okwuosa TM, Klein O, Chan C, Schreiner P, Liu K, Green D.  Long-term change in alcohol-consumption status and variations in fibrinogen levels: the coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA) study. BMJ Open 2013;3:e002944. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-002944

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 116:  Effects of genetic factors on the metabolism of alcohol  –  10 July 2013

A summary paper on genetically determined mechanisms related to the metabolism of alcohol and acetaldehyde describes numerous ways that the metabolism, especially of acetaldehyde, may be modified, both in the periphery of the body and in the brain.  Individuals with a mutation of the aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (the ALDH2*2 allele), and certain other genetically determined enzymes, do not tolerate alcohol and are much less likely to become alcohol abusers.  The authors state that their studies suggest possible therapeutic avenues in the treatment of alcoholism.

Reference:  Israel Y, Rivera-Meza M, Karahanian E, Quintanilla ME, Tampier L, Morales P, Herrera-Marschitz M.  Gene specific modifications unravel ethanol and acetaldehyde actions. Front Behav Neurosci 2013;7:80.doi:10.3389/fnbeh.2013.00080

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 115:  Potential association of alcohol consumption with diverticulosis  –  25 June 2013

The etiology of diverticulosis of the colon is poorly understood.  Many, but not all, studies suggest that low fiber intake and obesity increase the risk; few studies have evaluated the relation of alcohol consumption and diverticulosis, with inconclusive results.  This paper tests the cross-sectional association of alcohol consumption with diverticulosis among 746 asymptomatic consecutive subjects undergoing screening colonoscopies in Lebanon.

One-half of the subjects in this study were abstainers.  Most of the “drinkers” stated that they consumed alcohol occasionally or < 1 drink/day; only about 10% reported 1 or more drinks/day, and no data on type of beverage or pattern of drinking were available.  Nevertheless, from their analyses the authors conclude that alcohol consumption raises the risk of diverticulosis.

Forum members considered that this cross-sectional analysis provides little support for a causative effect of alcohol on the risk of diverticulosis.  Most larger observational studies have not shown such an effect.  In the present study, about 90% of subjects were either abstainers or consumed alcohol only occasionally or averaged < 1 drink/day.  Further, the investigators did not evaluate the pattern of drinking (including binge drinking) and the results do not support an increase in risk with greater drinking (lack of a dose-response relation).  Mechanisms for such an effect are largely unknown.  Thus, few of the Hill criteria for “causality” are met.

The authors’ use of an inter-country comparison of per-capita alcohol intake and reported diverticulosis has no relevance: there are large cultural differences between nations with high and those with low per-capita alcohol intake, and alcohol use may well have been just a marker for a western-type culture.  While the present study could be used to generate an hypothesis of a relation of alcohol intake to diverticulosis, attempts to validate such an association will require much additional research.

Reference:  Sharara AI, El-Halabi MM, Mansour NM, Malli A, Ghaith OA, Hashash JG, Maasri K, Soweid A, Barada K, Mourad FH, El Zahabi L.  Alcohol consumption is a risk factor for colonic diverticulosis.  J Clin Gastroenterol 2013;47:420–425.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 113:  Metabolic and biochemical mechanisms by which alcohol consumption affects health  –  11 June 2013

A large study from Australia, that included a high percentage of current or former alcohol abusers, related alcohol consumption with a variety of metabolic and biologic parameters that relate to health.  Included were markers of lipid function, inflammation, glucose metabolism, and liver function.  As expected, there was a linear increase in HDL-cholesterol with increasing alcohol intake; somewhat surprisingly, there was a linear decrease in insulin levels with increasing alcohol consumption (which may relate to the typical finding of a significantly lower risk of diabetes mellitus among moderate drinkers).  Essentially all of the other factors showed a “J-shaped” or “U-shaped” relation with alcohol: a decrease with small to moderate amounts of alcohol and an increase with larger intake.

In their association with alcohol, the lowest (most favorable) values of parameters varied by the measure: lowest triglycerides at about 1 to 2 drinks per day, lowest CRP at about 1 drink/day, lowest blood sugar and lowest alkaline phosphatase values at 1 to 3 drinks/day.  Adverse effects on liver enzymes, blood glucose, and inflammatory markers showed a threshold level of intake that varied somewhat by marker.  For example, reported non-drinkers had higher values of CRP, triglycerides, and alkaline phosphatase; among drinkers, significant increases were seen only in consumers of 40 or more drinks/week.  Unfortunately, the investigators did not report on the pattern of drinking, which usually shows preferable results from regular, moderate intake of alcohol with no binge drinking.

The key findings of the study can be summarized as favorable effects of moderate alcohol intake on HDL-cholesterol and insulin levels, and for most other factors (including liver enzymes, triglycerides, blood glucose, and the inflammatory marker CRP), a “J-shaped” relation: lower values with light drinking and higher values with larger amounts of alcohol.  For most of these, there was either no effect or a favorable effect until alcohol intake exceeded a “threshold value,” at which heavier drinking began to show adverse effects.

Forum reviewers agreed with the conclusion of the authors: “The pattern of potentially beneficial effects of alcohol on HDL-C and insulin increasing progressively as consumption increases, whereas the negative effects show thresholds, is consistent with net U- or J-shaped effects of alcohol on health.”  While actual health outcomes were not evaluated in this study, overall it provides strong support for the results of most prospective epidemiologic studies that show lower rates of cardiovascular and other diseases among light-to-moderate drinkers than among abstainers or heavy drinkers.

Reference:  Whitfield JB, Heath AC, Madden PAF, Pergadia ML, Montgomery GW, Martin NG.  Metabolic and biochemical effects of low-to-moderate alcohol consumption. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2013;37:575–586.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 112:  Relation of alcohol intake to risk of dying from cancer  –  23 May 2013

This paper presents a meta-analysis that related alcohol consumption to all-cancer mortality; it was based on almost 50,000 deaths reported in the literature from prospective cohort studies.  Forum reviewers had some concerns about the conclusions of the paper, based on some discrepancies in the text, the lack of data on drinking pattern, no beverage-specific results, etc.  Nevertheless, as expected, the reported average consumption of 50 or more grams of alcohol per day (equivalent to 4 or more typical drinks each day) was associated with an estimated 32% increased risk of dying from cancer.

However, there was no increase in the estimated risk of cancer death for subjects classified as “moderate” drinkers (defined by the authors using a wide range of intake: 12.6 to 49.9 grams/day, the equivalent of up to approximately 4 or more typical drinks).  Further, Forum members were surprised that a slight but statistically significant decrease in cancer mortality risk was seen for “light” drinkers (those reporting an average of ≤ 12.5 grams/day, or about one typical drink).  Forum members appreciated that misclassification of cause of death or residual confounding could have contributed to this latter result.

It is especially important that the only significant increase in risk in cancer mortality among the almost 50,000 cancer deaths reported in this meta-analysis was for consumers of 50 grams or more of alcohol.  This suggests strongly that the overall risk of cancer mortality related to alcohol consumption is primarily (perhaps almost exclusively) from heavier drinking.  Certainly, the findings from this study do not support the premise that “any amount of alcohol increases the overall risk of dying from cancer.”

Reference: Jin M, Cai S, Guo J, Zhu Y, Li M, Yu Y, Zhang S, Chen K.  Alcohol drinking and all cancer mortality: a meta-analysis. Ann Oncol 2013;24:807-816. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mds508.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 111:  Association of alcohol consumption with a measure of osteoporosis in elderly women  –  7 May 2013

The density of bones, measured as bone mineral density (BMD), is strongly related to osteoporosis.  Elderly women with osteoporosis, in particular, are at increased risk of fractures of the hip, arm, and spine; such fractures often relate to severe disability.  With data on alcohol collected as part of a clinical trial on the prevention of osteoporosis, investigators in Finland have related alcohol consumption to changes over three years in BMD.  After those excluded due to incomplete data, data on 300 women were available for analysis.  The majority of women were abstainers or consumed little alcohol.  Nevertheless, the results support much earlier research: regular, moderate drinking is associated with higher levels of BMD (i.e., lower risk of osteoporotic fractures) than is abstinence.

Forum reviewers, as did the authors, noted a number of limitations of the study: a rather small cohort with a very low intake of alcohol, a short duration of follow up, and rather small differences according to whether the women consumed alcohol or not.

Data from European surveys have shown that women in Finland tend to have high levels of osteoporosis and to drink very little; hence the increase in BMD associated with alcohol intake, even though slight, could be important in this population.  Over the past three decades, there has been an increase in alcohol consumption in Finland, especially a marked increase in the consumption of wine.  Hence, some Forum reviewers thought that the improvement in BMD among drinkers in this study may have been primarily from wine (which may have additional components, other than alcohol, that relate to BMD).  However, the number of subjects was not large enough to test this hypothesis in the present study.  Overall, this study supports the premise that moderate alcohol intake, along with an adequate calcium intake and vitamin D and exercise,  may have a favorable influence on the risk of developing osteoporosis

Reference:  Sommer I, Erkkilä AT, Järvinen R, Mursu J, Sirola J, Jurvelin JS, Kröger H, Tuppurainen M.  Alcohol consumption and bone mineral density in elderly women.  Public Health Nutr 2013;16:704-712.  doi: 10.1017/S136898001200331X.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 110:  Divergent effects of regular moderate and binge drinking – 30 April 2013

The present study relates alcohol consumption measured in young to middle-aged adults to mortality over a follow-up period of 20 years.  The analyses are based on data from a large population in a region of Norway where the alcohol drinking pattern most commonly reported was binge drinking on infrequent occasions.  Previous research has demonstrated that a very different drinking pattern – the frequent consumption of small amounts of alcohol – is generally considered to be the pattern associated with most health benefits.

In the present study, both men and women who reported consuming alcohol up to twice a month had about 20% lower mortality than did abstainers.  All groups reporting binge drinking had higher mortality than non-binge drinkers (which was statistically significant for men and had a similar estimated effect among women).  Cardiovascular and ischemic heart disease mortality had similar patterns as total mortality, being lower among drinkers but higher among those who reported binge drinking.

The key finding of this study is that there are divergent effects on mortality of the frequency of drinking and the amount of alcohol consumed per occasion.  While the results for this study may reflect a certain Northern European pattern of drinking (not frequent but heavy on each occasion), they may not apply to other European or North American populations, where drinking is more frequent but binge drinking less common.  Nevertheless, the results of this study support results typically found in more moderately drinking populations: more frequent drinking, but smaller amounts per occasion, is the pattern of alcohol consumption associated with the lowest risk of mortality.  Both aspects of drinking must be considered when studying the relation of alcohol to mortality.

Reference:  Graff-Iversen S, Jansen MD, Hoff DA, Høiseth G, Knudsen GP, Magnus P, Mørland J, Normann PT, Næss ØE, Tambs K.  Divergent associations of drinking frequency and binge consumption of alcohol with mortality within the same cohort.  J Epidemiol Community Health 2013;67:350-357. doi:10.1136/jech-2012-201564.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 109: In women developing breast cancer, moderate alcohol consumption before or after diagnosis does not increase breast cancer mortality and decreases total mortality   –  16 April 2013

Most previous research has shown a slight increase in the risk of breast cancer (BrCa) among women who consume alcohol (versus nondrinkers), even among those whose average is only one drink/day.  The association with death due to breast cancer is less clear, although overall total mortality among moderate drinkers is almost always lower than among non-drinkers; this reduction is generally attributed to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

The present study related alcohol consumption, both prior to the diagnosis of BrCa and after the diagnosis, with survival; deaths from BrCa and from cardiovascular disease, as well as total mortality, were related to alcohol intake.  Specifically, in this study the authors assessed alcohol intake in a cohort of 22,890 women with incident invasive breast cancer (BrCa) who were residents of one of four US states and diagnosed at ages 20 to 79 years.  During a median follow-up period of 11.3 years after diagnosis of BrCa, 7,780 deaths occurred, including 3,484 attributed to breast cancer.

Based on a quadratic analysis, moderate alcohol consumption before diagnosis showed a tendency towards lower risk of death from BrCa, and a significantly greater reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality and total mortality.   Alcohol consumption after diagnosis was not associated with disease-specific survival, but was associated with a lower risk of total mortality.  For women consuming alcohol prior to the diagnosis of BrCa, those who decreased their intake showed little effect on mortality, while those who increased their intake showed further lowering of their risk of cardiovascular and total mortality.

Forum reviewers considered this to be an excellent paper providing important new data on the association of alcohol consumption with survival after a diagnosis of invasive breast cancer.  They thought that the statements of the authors accurately reflected their data, as they concluded: “Overall alcohol consumption before diagnosis was not associated with disease-specific survival, but we found a suggestion favoring moderate consumption.  There was no evidence for an association with postdiagnosis alcohol intake and breast cancer survival.  This study, however, does provide support for a benefit of limited alcohol intake for cardiovascular and overall survival in women with breast cancer.”

An accompanying editorial* agreed with the conclusions of the authors.  The editorial stated, “Based on the best available evidence, including [the present report], it appears that modest alcohol consumption after breast cancer diagnosis, up to approximately one drink per day on average, may be associated with optimal overall survival, without compromising breast cancer-specific survival.”

*Demark-Wahnefried W.  To your health: How does the latest research on alcohol and breast cancer inform clinical practice?  jco.ascopubs.org/cgi/doi/10.1200/JCO.2013.490466),

Reference:  Newcomb PA, Kampman E, Trentham-Dietz A, Egan KM, Titus LJ, Baron JA, Hampton JM, Passarelli MN, Willett WC.  Alcohol consumption before and after breast cancer diagnosis: Associations with survival from breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other causes.  J Clin Oncol 2013; pre-publication. Available at   jco.ascopubs.org/cgi/doi/10.1200/JCO.2012.46.5765

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 108:  An unusual paper relating alcohol consumption to the risk of stroke

Numerous well-done prospective epidemiologic studies have shown that while heavy drinking may increase the risk of stroke, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is usually associated with a significant decrease in the risk of the most common type of stroke, ischemic stroke.

This paper from investigators in Finland states that it was designed to relate alcohol consumption and obesity to the risk of ischemic stroke.  Unfortunately, even though it has clearly been shown that the amount and pattern of alcohol consumption strongly modify the effect on the risk of stroke, for some unknown reason the authors have grouped all consumers of alcohol into a single group.  Specifically, there are no data given that describe the relation of light-to-moderate alcohol consumption with stroke.  Hence, the conclusion of the authors that “alcohol increases the risk of stroke” is not supported by the data presented.  In the opinion of members of the Forum, without reporting the effects according to the amount of alcohol consumed or the pattern of drinking, this is an unsupported and potentially dangerous statement to present in a scientific journal.

Reference:  Rantakömi SH, Laukkanen JA, Sivenius J, Kauhanen J, Kurl S.  Alcohol consumption and the risk of stroke among hypertensive and overweight men.  J Neurol 2013;260:534–539.  DOI 10.1007/s00415-012-6672-6

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 107:  Little effect on child’s mental functioning associated with mother’s light, occasional drinking in early pregnancy – 25 March 2013

A new report from the prospective, population-based Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) in the UK is based on investigation of the association between light drinking in pregnancy (<1 glass per week in the first trimester) and child mental health.  Mental health was assessed in more than 6,000 children using both parent- and teacher-rated Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires (SDQs) at age 11 years.  Academic outcomes based on Key Stage 2 examination results were measured in more than 10,000 children.

Approximately 40% of women consumed some alcohol but less than 1 glass/week, while 16% reported consuming ≥1 glass per week during the first trimester.  The authors report that after adjustment, relative to abstainers, there was no effect of light drinking on teacher-rated scores or examination results.  In girls, although there was a suggestion of worse outcomes on the parent-rated total score in those exposed to light drinking compared to abstainers, no dose–response relationship was evident.  The authors conclude: “Light drinking in pregnancy does not appear to be associated with clinically important adverse effects for mental health and academic outcomes at the age of 11 years.”

Forum reviewers considered this to be a well-done study, with a balanced assessment of results by the authors.  Reviewers were surprised at the somewhat arbitrary separation of alcohol consumption: <1 drink per week versus ≥1 drink per week.  Current guidance about alcohol consumption in pregnancy from the Department of Health in England (2009) allows for pregnant women to drink up to 1–2 units of alcohol once or twice a week, and it would have been preferable to have data presented for drinkers at this level.

Forum Co-Director Conibear considered that “The most important aspect of this study relates to the fact that 25% of babies in the UK are unplanned, and 17% of mothers do not know they are pregnant until eight weeks or more.  Therefore balanced advice concerning the effect of alcohol use in early pregnancy is crucial to prevent unnecessary concern amongst this group of mothers to be.  Although the best advice is to avoid alcohol if you are pregnant, the present research can reassure mothers who drank occasionally without realising that they were pregnant that they have not done long-term harm to their baby.”

Forum reviewer Stockley added: “I think that another important message is that if a woman decides to consume a small amount of alcohol during pregnancy, she should never binge drink or get drunk.  This we know can have adverse effects on the developing fetus, especially in the first trimester, but interestingly, also in the third trimester of pregnancy.”

Reference:  Sayal K, Draper ES, Fraser R, Barrow M, Davey Smith G, Gray R.  Light drinking in pregnancy and mid-childhood mental health and learning outcomes.  Arch Dis Child 2013;98:107–111. doi:10.1136/archdischild-2012-302436.

For the full critique of this publication by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 106:  A clinical trial shows that glucose metabolism is improved more by red wine than by gin   —   14 March 2013

To compare the effects of moderate consumption of red wine, dealcoholized red wine, and gin on glucose metabolism and the lipid profile, a group of Spanish investigators carried out a randomized control trial among 67 men at high cardiovascular risk.  All received each of red wine (30 g alcohol/d), the equivalent amount of dealcoholized red wine, and gin (30 g alcohol/d) for 4 week periods, in a randomized order.  While fasting glucose levels were not affected, mean adjusted plasma insulin and HOMA-IR decreased after red wine and dealcoholized red wine, but not after gin.  HDL cholesterol, Apolipoprotein A-I and A-II increased after red wine and gin. Lipoprotein(a) decreased after the red wine intervention.  The authors conclude that their results support a beneficial effect of the non-alcoholic fraction of red wine (mainly polyphenols) on insulin resistance, thus greater protective effects on cardiovascular disease from red wine than from other alcoholic beverages.

Forum members were unanimous in considering this to be a very well-done and important trial.  It supports a huge amount of observational data from epidemiologic cohort studies that have shown that subjects who consume moderate amounts of alcohol tend to have much lower risk of developing diabetes.  Further, patients with diabetes who drink moderately have much lower risk of subsequent cardiovascular disease and lower mortality.  Studies such as this one help scientists understand the mechanisms by which moderate drinking, especially of wine, can reduce the risk of metabolic and vascular diseases.

Reference:  Chiva-Blanch G,  Urpi-Sarda M, Ros E, Valderas-Martinez P, Casas R, Arranz S, Guillén M, Lamuela-Raventós RM, Llorach R, Andres-Lacueva C, Estruch R. Effects of red wine polyphenols and alcohol on glucose metabolism and the lipid profile: A randomized clinical trial.  Clinical Nutrition 2013.  Pre-publication. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2012.08.022.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 105:  For preventing cardiovascular disease, an unrestricted-calorie Mediterranean-type diet provides 30% more benefit than a low-fat diet: Results of a large population-based clinical trial  –  6 March 2013

A large well-done clinical trial in Spain was carried out among 7,447 subjects at high-risk of cardiovascular disease (on the basis of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and other risk factors).  The trial compared the effects of two versions of an energy-unrestricted Mediterranean-type diet, one with large amounts of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) and one with a supplement of mixed nuts, with results among subjects in a “control group,” made up of subjects who were advised to follow a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet (that has typically been recommended for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease).

Both of the groups advised to consume a Med-Diet showed an increase in total fat, from an average of 39.3 % of total calories to an average of more than 41%; the group advised to decrease their total fat lowered their intake from 39 to 37 % of calories.  All three groups showed slight decreases in saturated fat and slight decreases in dietary cholesterol intake (but blood cholesterol levels were not reported).  Only the Med-Diet + nuts group showed an increase in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the fatty acid related to the lowest risk of cardiovascular disease in the Cretan cohort of the Seven-Countries Study and in the Lyon Diet-Heart Study.

The large majority of subjects in all groups consumed wine at baseline, and about one-third of the Med-Diet groups and one-quarter of the control group reported consuming ≥ 7 glasses of wine/week during the trial.   However, alcohol consumption was not evaluated specifically for its effects in the present study.

The study was ended early by its data and safety monitoring board due to marked advantages being shown in terms of the occurrence of the primary end-point (the occurrence of myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes) in both Med-Diet groups in comparison with the control group.  The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 0.70 and 0.72 for the Med-Diet with olive oil and the Med-Diet with added nuts, hence an approximately 30% decrease in risk among subjects assigned to a Med-Diet compared with those in the control group.

Forum members (as did the authors) had difficulty in determining which specific components of the Med-Diet may have been the primary reasons for its more favorable results, as significant dietary changes during the trial were mainly related to the supplementary olive oil or nuts given to subjects in the two Med-Diet groups.  Among potential factors were increased mono-unsaturated fat and higher antioxidants from the added EVOO and an increase in ALA from the supplemental nuts.  Forum members noted that the Med-Diet interventions apparently did not provide an increase in the intake of ALA, which could have led to even more protection against cardiovascular disease.

In any case, the striking reduction in risk shown in the study from the Med-Diet provide further evidence of the effectiveness of such a diet in reducing cardiovascular disease.  It has been shown repeatedly that people advised to consume a Mediterranean-type diet tend to comply much better with such advice than do people advised mainly to decrease their intake of all fats and cholesterol.  A very large amount of  scientific data now support advice to follow a Mediterranean-type diet, one that does not restrict calories but encourages the intake of selected fats (which may include extra-virgin olive oil or canola oil), as well as more fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, and wine; it may be the most effective  dietary approach for reducing cardiovascular disease.

Reviewer Keil points out that many good prospective cohort studies have shown that an increase in adherence to components of a Mediterranean-type diet decreases the risk of many diseases and mortality.  He adds: “The great thing about the present study is that when the skeptics raise  their voice and argue that the proponents of the Mediterranean diet have only observational data available, we can now respond that we not only have RCT data on secondary prevention (Lyon Diet-Heart study) but also the present study on primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.”

Reference:  Estruch R, Ros E, Salas-Salvadó J, Covas M-I, Corella D, Arós F, et al, for the PREDIMED Study Investigators.  Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with a Mediterranean diet.   N Engl J Med 2013. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1200303

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please clickhere.

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Critique 104:  Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of diabetes   —   26 February 2013

A population-based longitudinal study in Norway showed a lower risk of developing type II diabetes, and a tendency for less auto-immune diabetes, among subjects reporting moderate alcohol consumption.  The lowest risk was among subjects reporting that they consumed alcohol 5-10 times during the previous two weeks or reporting a daily consumption of 10-15 grams of alcohol per day (slightly less than one to a little over one drink per day, using 12 g of alcohol per day as a “typical drink”).

The overall results from this study support most previous research showing a rather large (approximately 30% or more) reduction in the risk of Type II diabetes mellitus to be associated with moderate drinking.  In this study, the strongest protective effect related to the consumption of wine, rather than beer or spirits.  Unlike some previous research, the present study did not show an increased risk of diabetes among binge drinkers, heavier drinkers, those reporting episodes of intoxication, or those giving positive responses on a CAGE questionnaire (a measure of an alcohol use disorder).  As it is likely that alcoholics were under-represented in the cohort, the ability to show the effects of very heavy drinking may have been limited.

While the numbers of subjects with auto-immune diabetes were small, there was a tendency seen for a similar reduction in risk with moderate drinking as with the much more common Type II diabetes.  Overall, this study strongly supports much previous research showing that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of developing diabetes.

Reference:  Rasouli B, Ahlbom A, Andersson T, Grill V, Midthjell K, Olsson L, Carlsson S.  Alcohol consumption is associated with reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes and autoimmune diabetes in adults: results from the Nord-Trøndelag health study.  Diabet Med 2013;30:56–64.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 103:  Alcohol intake just prior to bed-time may affect your sleep patterns   —  18 February 2013

A paper from experts in the science of sleep provides an excellent review of intervention studies since the 1980s on the effects of alcohol consumption on sleep.  The study finds that the time required to fall asleep, and sleep patterns in the first part of the night, tend to be improved by alcohol.  The authors conclude that “The onset of the first REM sleep period is significantly delayed at all doses and appears to be the most recognizable effect of alcohol on REM sleep, followed by the reduction in total night REM sleep.”  Slow-wave sleep is more common and REM sleep less common after alcohol.

The studies reviewed in this report were intervention studies among mainly young normal subjects, not people with sleep disorders.  Other studies have demonstrated that small amounts of alcohol given in the evening to the elderly may improve sleep, and reduce the need for sleep-inducing medications.  Overall, the data reviewed in this paper suggest that small amounts of alcohol in the evening have few adverse effects on sleep, and relate to earlier onset of sleep and less awakening in the first part of the night.  Larger amounts of alcohol tend to make the onset of sleep faster, but may have some adverse overall effects on sleep patterns, with a shorter duration of REM sleep throughout the night.

Reference:  Ebrahim IO, Shapiro CM, Williams AJ, Fenwick PB.  Alcohol and sleep I: Effects on normal sleep.  Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2013;doi: 10.1111/acer.12006. [Epub ahead of print]

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Requested comments on paper by Nelson et al

by R. Curtis Ellison, MD, Professor of Medicine & Public Health,

Boston University School of Medicine

NOTE:  These comments do not necessarily reflect the views of the members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research

Nelson DE, et al.  Alcohol-attributable cancer deaths and years of potential life lost in the United States.  Am J Pub Health, released February 14, 2013

We always welcome new scientific publications that help elucidate factors related to the development of cancer.  The new paper by Nelson et al focuses on the role that alcohol consumption may play in the risk of a number of cancers.

Background:  It has long been appreciated that there are a number of upper aero-digestive cancers, such as cancer of the mouth, throat, and esophagus, that occur much more frequently in heavy drinkers, especially alcoholics, than in abstainers.  Physiologic studies suggest that these are not diseases of light to moderate drinkers, as a certain amount of alcohol is required to produce these diseases.  Similarly, among people consuming enough alcohol to lead to liver cirrhosis, the risk of liver cancer is also markedly increased.

These “alcohol-related cancers” should be discussed separately from other more common cancers – especially colon cancer and female breast cancer – for which the risk may be only slightly increased by alcohol.  In the case of breast cancer, there may be a slight increase in risk among some women consuming an average of only one drink/day (in some studies, such an increase in risk occurs primarily among women who binge drink, have an inadequate intake of folate, and/or are also on hormone replacement therapy.)

For these types of cancer, it is especially important to consider the net health effects of alcohol consumption.  For example, it is estimated that if a woman at average risk of breast cancer (i.e., does not have such a cancer in a first-degree relative) decides to avoid drinking completely in hopes of reducing her risk of breast cancer, her risk of breast cancer would be expected to be slightly decreased, on average, by perhaps 5-10%; however, her risk would be increased of dying from much more common diseases such as heart attack,  stroke, or other conditions for which small amounts of alcohol have been shown to reduce risk.  And, importantly, her risk of dying of any cause (total mortality) would actually be increased by her avoiding light alcohol consumption.

The pattern of drinking has often been shown to be even more important than the average amount of alcohol consumed.  A stronger association with beneficial effects is seen with the regular (up to daily) intake of small amounts of an alcoholic beverage; drinking larger amounts on fewer days (including binge drinking) is almost always associated with adverse health effects.  For example, a man having up to 2 drinks each day would have an average of 14 drinks per week, generally considered to be within recommended guidelines.  However, a man consuming 7 drinks on each of only two days each week, despite the same weekly average consumption, would not be considered to be a moderate drinker.

Comments on the present paper:  There are a number of concerns about the analyses and conclusions of the authors of the present paper.  These include the following:

(1)  The authors have “corrected” the reported data on alcohol consumption to make up for presumed under-reporting, using a method not generally accepted by statisticians and other researchers.  This means that even many “light” drinkers are listed as reporting greater amounts of alcohol.

(2)  The authors do not clearly separate the effects of truly moderate drinking from heavier drinking in their conclusions.  They use up to 20 grams of alcohol per day as their lowest drinking category; this is higher than the 14 g/day that is the current definition of responsible drinking for women in the US Guidelines.  Further, as stated, if reported intakes are increased artificially, many more light drinkers would be bumped up into higher categories of drinking.  The result of this mis-categorization is that bona fide moderate drinking, which has been shown by others to have no association with most types of cancer, is improperly associated in this study with increased cancer.

(3)  The authors’ implications that even regular, moderate drinking increases the risk of many cancers is not consistent with most previous research.  Further, by not having data on the pattern of drinking, the authors include binge drinkers in the same category as regular drinkers, further exaggerating the association of cancer with moderate drinking.  Others have clearly shown that there are large differences in effect between these two patterns.  (It is troubling also that in the paper, the estimated percentage of alcohol-attributable cancer risk among subjects reporting > 0 to 20 grams of alcohol per day is much higher than that of subjects reporting > 20 to 40 grams/day; while this partly relates to the large number of persons who drink only small amounts, such an association makes no sense biologically.  It is difficult to understand who the subjects are in the lowest drinking group, but it may include a large percentage of ex-alcoholics or heavier drinkers underreporting their intake.  However, this makes any conclusions in this paper regarding the risk of cancer among moderate drinkers highly suspect.)

(4)  The authors do not point out the demonstrated effects of alcohol on total mortality; regular, light-to-moderate drinkers live longer.  By focusing only on cancer risks, the authors fail to mention the effects on the risk of much more common conditions, such as coronary heart disease, stroke, dementia, other important health problems of ageing, and on total mortality.  The study of the health benefits and problems of drinking is a very mature field — authors generally discuss their observations in the context of total mortality or other major diseases that would be affected by their experimental design.  In nearly all cases, light drinking is shown to be beneficial; these studies are ignored here.

(5)  Overall, a criticism of this paper relates to the failure of the authors to put their results into perspective.  Statements such as “There is no safe threshold for alcohol and cancer risk” is more of a “scare” statement than a balanced discussion of their results.  Given that almost all prospective studies show that regular moderate drinkers have better health as they age and live longer than lifetime abstainers, even papers focused on the effects of alcohol on any particular disease should present a balanced view on its net effects on health and disease.

(6)  Finally, the authors of this paper have taken the results of their analyses (some of which are based on questionable assumptions) as “truth,” then expounding at length about the public health implications.  There should always be a certain amount of doubt when presenting the results of an individual study, as no one analysis can possibly reveal everything about an association.  (As stated by Voltaire: “Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd!)

As the authors acknowledge, observational epidemiologic data can never reveal the full “truth” about the causation of disease from exposures, and each new study’s results must be interpreted taking into consideration previous research.  However, the overall implications presented by the authors of this paper suggest that their goal may have been to support a presumed conclusion to discourage alcohol consumption, not to carefully interpret the available data to best advance the public health.

Key points of these comments

There are a number of assumptions taken by the authors in their analyses that raise  questions about their results. The authors present only “adjusted” data for reported alcohol intake (based on national sales, not on individual intake), making the relation of alcohol intake to the occurrence of cancer in individuals unclear.

There is poor differentiation between regular moderate drinking and periodic heavy drinking (binge drinking) or alcoholism, although there are marked differences in health effects between these groups.  Regular, moderate drinking is associated with net health benefits, whereas binge drinking and alcoholism have almost exclusively adverse effects (including increases in many types of cancer).

There has been a huge amount of previous research in this field, but the authors do not put their own results into perspective or discuss the overall health effects of alcohol consumption.  Previous data have clearly shown that regular moderate drinkers tend to have lower risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, and many other diseases, and have a lower overall risk of all-cause mortality.

Submitted by

R. Curtis Ellison, MD, Professor of Medicine & Public Health; Director, Institute on Lifestyle & Health;l Boston University School of Medicine

Co-Director, International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research

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Critique 102:  Possible prevention of myocardial infarction from alcohol’s effects on periodontal disease: An hypothesis   —   6 February 2013

A cross-sectional analysis among more than 5,000 Norwegian men was designed to determine if the frequency of alcohol consumption related to the risk of myocardial infarction associated with infectious periodontal disease.  The authors hypothesized that because it is bactericidal, frequent alcohol consumption would decrease periodontal infection and lower the risk of tooth extraction related to periodontal infection.  The authors state that their main finding was that frequent drinking lowers the risk of MI associated with periodontal disease.

Forum reviewers had real concern about the paper and the conclusions of the authors.  Some stressed that the per cent of alcohol in most “drinks” is too low to be really bactericidal, that the key exposures (alcohol and oral infections) were based exclusively on self report and did not have information on type of beverage or pattern of drinking, that many confounders (especially related to socio-economic status) were not adequately taken into consideration, and that the authors did not really test the results of their study with appropriate statistical testing.

Current scientific data show an increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease to be associated with periodontitis.  Further, data consistently show a decrease in the risk of cardiovascular disease from moderate drinking, and a very large number of mechanisms have been identified.   However, the present study does not confirm that alcohol consumption plays an important role in preventing heart disease through its effect on periodontitis.

Reference: Håheim LL, Olsen I, Rønningen KS.  Oral infection, regular alcohol drinking pattern, and myocardial infarction.  Medical Hypotheses 2012;79:725–730.

For the full critique of this article by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 101:  A review of the association of alcohol consumption with the risk of developing hypertension  –  22 January 2013

A meta-analysis from investigators at Columbia University in New York evaluated the risk of developing hypertension according to the level of alcohol consumption previously recorded.  The analyses were based on data from 16 prospective studies.  The paper’s main results are that among men, there is little effect of alcohol consumption up to 30 grams of alcohol per day (the equivalent of about 2 ½ “typical drinks” by US standards or more than 3 drinks by UK standards), but evidence of an increased risk of hypertension for the intake of greater amounts of alcohol.  For women, light drinking appears to be associated with a slightly lower risk of hypertension, but more than 20 grams/day of alcohol may increase the risk.

While Forum members thought that the analyses were done well, they had some concerns about the conclusions of the authors, some of which appear to not be in line with the data they presented.  For example, their statement that “heavier alcohol consumption >20 g⁄d is associated with the risk of development of hypertension in both women and men” is not consistent with their findings of a significant increased risk of hypertension only with an intake of 31 – 40 grams of alcohol per day.

Similarly, the authors conclude: “Even for light drinkers, vigilant blood pressure monitoring is necessary,” which may not be appropriate given that their data show that intake below 30 grams per day has no significant association with hypertension in men and may actually reduce the risk of hypertension in women.

Overall, the results of this study, in line with findings from most previous research, indicate that people who consume alcohol according to most current drinking guidelines (no more than 2 typical drinks/day for men or 1/day for women) do not show an increase in their risk of hypertension, but heavier drinking appears to increase the risk.   Not discussed in this paper, but especially important in terms of health, is that light drinking is associated with a significant and rather large decrease in the risk of the most serious sequelae of  hypertension: coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke.

Reference:  Briasoulis A, Agarwal V, Messerli FH.  Alcohol consumption and the risk of hypertension in men and women:  A systematic review and meta-analysis.  J Clin Hypertens 2012;14:792-798.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 100:  The effects of moderate drinking on cognitive function and dementia: An update –  15 January 2013

A paper from a group of Italian scientists provides an extensive review of the available research relating alcohol consumption to cognitive function.  It presents brief summaries of results from most key epidemiologic studies dealing with this topic between 1987 and 2011.  The large majority of these studies, and recent meta-analyses, support a finding of a lower risk of cognitive impairment from ageing and of dementia to be associated with moderate drinking.

Reviewers praised the authors for pointing out difficulties caused by having to develop guidelines for alcohol consumption based only on observational data, and not having large clinical trials for judging effect.  A further problem faced in judging the numerous studies on this topic is that many lack data on beverage type and most lack detailed information on the pattern of drinking, which may be especially important in judging the effects of drinking.

Some reviewers stated that the paper does not present anything new, as previous meta-analyses have clearly shown a potentially protective effect of moderate alcohol consumption on the risk of cognitive decline and dementia.  Given that recent large meta-analyses have shown that moderate drinking, is comparison with abstention, is usually associated with 20-35% lower risk of cognitive decline and dementia, Forum reviewers thought that the conclusions of the authors of this review paper were unnecessarily cautious.  Overall, current scientific data support a conclusion that moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages, especially of wine, is neuroprotective.

Reference:  Panza F, Frisardi V, Seripa D, Logroscino G, Santamato A, Imbimbo BP, Scafato E, Pilotto A, Solfrizzi V.  Alcohol consumption in mild cognitive impairment and dementia: harmful or neuroprotective?  Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 2012;27:1218-1238.

For the full review of this critique by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 099:  Alcohol and survival after postmenopausal diagnosis of breast cancer   —   20 December 2012

This paper assessed the association of pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption with disease recurrence and survival in a prospective cohort study in Germany based on 2,522 postmenopausal breast cancer patients, aged 50–74 years.  The authors report that alcohol consumption was non-linearly associated with increased breast cancer-specific mortality, but not with breast cancer recurrence.  Results were independent of estrogen receptor status.  The authors also report a non-significantly decreased risk of mortality due to other causes.

Forum reviewers considered this to be a well-done analysis that was limited, however, by the lack of data on drinking patterns prior to breast cancer diagnosis and because no data were available on drinking after the diagnosis (the latter limits the applicability of its results to women who have already developed breast cancer).  The comparisons were primarily between non-drinkers/light drinkers and women in the highest alcohol category; the authors state that when ex-drinkers were removed from the referent category, their results regarding breast cancer-specific mortality were no longer statistically significant.   The authors do not describe the potential effects on their main results that could result from what is known as “index event bias,” which may occur when an exposure (e.g., alcohol)  relates to the development of a disease, breast cancer in this study, and may also relate to sequelae (e.g., recurrence or death) from the same disease.

Forum reviewers conclude that current scientific data show that alcohol consumption may increase the risk of developing breast cancer.  However, they believe that the effects on subsequent survival after such a diagnosis remain unclear.

Reference: Vrieling A, Buck K, Heinz J, Obi N, Benner A, Flesch-Janys D, Chang-Claude J.  Pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption and postmenopausal breast cancer survival: a prospective patient cohort study.  Breast Cancer Res Treat 2012;136:195–207.  DOI 10.1007/s10549-012-2230-2

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 098:  Moderate alcohol consumption may lower the risk of developing depression  –  13 December 2012

Analyses from a prospective study of more than 13,000 adults in Spain related baseline alcohol intake (mainly wine) with the development of depression, with the outcome based on a physician’s diagnosis or on the habitual use of anti-depressant drugs for four or more years.  Reported depression was much higher among women than men.  Among women, the estimated hazard ratios for groups reporting an average alcohol intake of < 5 g/day of alcohol, 5-15 g/day, and > 15 g/day were 0.97, 0.62, and 0.84 (in comparison with subjects reporting no alcohol).  The difference was statistically significant (CI = 0.43-0.89) for the group reporting 5-15 g/day.

Few men reported a diagnosis of depression; among moderately drinking men, the estimated risks of depression were similar to those of women, but none of the differences were statistically different from those of non-drinkers.  The investigators found no differences according to the type of alcoholic beverage consumed.

The merits of this study include that the data were collected prospectively, that there were repeated questionnaires seeking data on depression, and that there were a large number of subjects, all of whom were college graduates.  There were few men reporting depression, and few heavy drinkers, so results apply only to moderately drinking women.  Among these women (those consuming between about ½ drink/day to about 1 or 1 ½ drinks per day) there was evidence of a lower risk of depression during a follow-up period extending up to 10 years.

Forum reviewers thought that this was a well-done analysis, and the use of cut-points for drinking groups according to spline analyses was appropriate. Some reviewers cautioned that moderate drinkers, especially regular wine drinkers, tend to have a large number of other healthy lifestyle habits that could relate to the risk of depression. While many of the recognized potential confounders were included in the Cox regression analysis in this paper, it will be important to determine if future studies support the conclusions of the authors.

Reference: Gea A, Martinez-Gonzalez MA, Toledo E, Sanchez-Villegas A, Bes-Rastrollo M, Nuñez-Cordoba JM, Sayon-Orea C, Beunza JJ.  A longitudinal assessment of alcohol intake and incident depression: the SUN Project.  BMC Public Health 2012, 12:954 doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-954

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 097:  Per-capita alcohol intake and all-cause mortality in Australia  –  4 December 2012

An ecologic analysis from a group in Australia has related trends in the per-capita consumption of alcohol in Australia with rates of all-cause mortality.  Unfortunately, the authors do not have data on individual consumption of alcohol (and no way of knowing if the people who drink or do not drink are those who die) and do not have data on many key factors that relate to both alcohol consumption and mortality (e.g., education, income, diet, occupation, etc.).  Especially, they have no data on the patterns of consumption of members of the population (regular moderate intake or binge drinking).  They “adjust” for death rates in women but do not report sex-specific mortality rates.

This paper illustrates many of the dangers of the so-called “ecologic fallacy,” in which comparisons are made between aggregate population data and biologic outcomes.  It has been shown that such comparisons may be of interest in generating hypotheses, but not for answering questions of causation, for which different types of studies are required.  As stated in a leading textbook of epidemiology: “Ecologic analysis poses major problems of interpretation when making ecologic inferences and especially when making biologic inferences.  In contemporary epidemiology, the ‘ecologic fallacy’ reflects the failure of the investigator to recognize the need for biologic inference and thus for individual-level data.  This need arises even when the primary exposure of interest is an ecologic measure and the outcome of interest is the health status of entire populations.”

With such serious limitations from the use of ecologic comparisons, this paper does not provide data upon which alcohol policy can be based.  The authors of this paper appear to have ignored previous research providing very different interpretations of an inverse association between per-capita alcohol intake and mortality.  A plethora of studies based on alcohol intake among individuals, and especially patterns of consumption, provide data needed for such policy decisions.

Reference:  Livingston M, Wilkinson C.  Per-capita alcohol consumption and all-cause male mortality in Australia, 1911–2006.  Alcohol and Alcoholism 2012.  Pre-publication: doi: 10.1093/alcalc/ags123

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 096:  Frequency of alcohol consumption and cardiovascular risk factors: implications for drinking guidelines   —   20 November 2012

As stated by the authors, “many observational studies suggest that increased drinking frequency is associated with reduced mortality among those with low-dose alcohol consumption.  The purpose of this paper was to examine whether frequent drinkers consume lower-risk amounts during drinking days or have favorable risk factor profiles compared with those who drink less frequently, and discuss implications for the larger debate about the limitations of non-randomized studies about ‘moderate’ drinking and the development of low-risk drinking guidelines.”  Indeed, previous epidemiologic research has clearly shown that the healthiest outcomes occur among regular, moderate drinkers who do not binge drink.  Further, almost all studies have adjusted for a large number of socio-economic factors that are known to be potentially confounding factors for evaluating the  association of alcohol consumption with health outcomes.

As expected, the present study shows that regular drinkers tend to consume less alcohol per occasion, and are less likely to binge drink.  Further, such individuals tend to have better socio-economic status and lower levels of most cardiovascular risk factors.  Most previous researchers have interpreted the better educational status and economic levels of moderate drinkers to be important causes of their more moderate lifestyle factors (including avoiding abusive drinking).  Further, most previous research, including many basic science interventions and limited trials in humans, have shown that the administration (intake) of moderate amounts of an alcoholic beverage leads to more favorable cardiovascular risk factors, and numerous mechanisms have been identified (higher HDL-cholesterol, improved vascular reactivity, improved platelet and other coagulation factors, etc.).

The authors of this paper take an unusual turn when it comes to discussing the implications of their results.  They tend to down-play any potential health benefits that may be caused by alcohol or the pattern of drinking and infer instead that the favorable risk factors themselves may lead to the drinking pattern. Forum members disagreed with the implications of the authors on a number of factors: (1) the lack of randomized trials of low-dose alcohol consumption; (2) levels of evidence; (3) drinking frequency and alcohol intake; (4) clustering of lifestyle behaviors; (5) alcohol consumption and CVD-related biomarkers; (6) alcohol intake, cancer and total mortality.  Further, Forum reviewers cite a large body of scientific research that refutes some of the conclusions of the authors, e.g., that regular moderate alcohol intake does not relate to improved cardiovascular risk factors.

Forum reviewers agree with a concluding statement of the authors about using caution before recommending drinking to the general public.  However, they believe that the arguments presented in this paper are not based on a balanced appraisal of available scientific data, and should not be used to support changes in guidelines for the public.

Reference:  Naimi TS, Xuan Z, Brown DW, Saitz R.  Confounding and studies of ‘moderate’ alcohol consumption: the case of drinking frequency and implications for low-risk drinking guidelines.  Addiction 2012; pre-publication.  doi:10.1111/j.1360-0443.2012.04074.x.

For the complete critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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A Tribute to Francesco Orlandi

(1927  –  2012)

It is with sadness that we have learned of the death on 12 November 2012 in Ancona, Italy, of Francesco Orlandi, MD.   Francesco was a founding member of our International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, and a frequent and valuable contributor to our critiques.  He will be sorely missed, both as a friend and as a respected scientist.  Besides his strong passion for science, he was an extraordinarily cultivated man, rich in his sense of humor, and a sincere friend of many members of our Forum.

Francesco Orlandi was Professor of Gastroenterology at the University of Ancona from 1975 to 1999 and Direttore, Dottorato di ricerca Alimenti e Salute, 1997-99.  He also served as Professor on wine and health at the Corso di Laurea Specialistica in Scienze Viticole ed Enologiche at the University of Turin.

Francesco was counselor and coordinator of the “wine and health” group of the Accademia Italiana della Vite e del Vino, and an OIV expert at the Italian Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies in Rome.  In addition, he served as Visiting Professor in the Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, in 1977-8.

Francesco was always interested in the study of the health risks and benefits of alcohol consumption.  In the 1990’s, he performed a number of experimental studies in rats on the mechanisms of early ethanol-induced liver damage, with particular attention to apoptosis and cell proliferation.

More recently Francesco became increasingly interested in the beneficial effects of moderate alcohol consumption on human health.  He became convinced that only by working in a multi-disciplinary context could young investigators contribute to a new renaissance of alcohol and wine research in Italy.  This is why in June, 2011, he organized the first seminar on responsible drinking in the context of the Mediterranean Diet, which was held in the ancient Pontignano Abbey, near Siena.  There he brought together all young Italian scientists involved in this field of research; the abstracts of this meeting have been published (Eur J Nutr 2011;50:489–498).

As stated by a Forum member, Francesco was much more than a great doctor and an outstanding scientist.  He was an old style gentleman, able to use the right words in every social context.  He was an extremely educated person, cultivating interests from art, music, and sailing to science with the emotional motivation, intellectual freedom, and motivated curiosity that usually only young talents can have.  Francesco will remain forever a young enthusiastic scientist for all of us who had the fortunate chance of interacting with him.

These comments provided by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research  (www.bu.edu/alcohol-forum)

 

15 November 2012

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Critique 095:  Effects of alcohol on lymphoma, leukemia, and other types of hematological cancers    —- 13 November 2012

Many observational epidemiologic studies have found an inverse association between alcohol consumption and hematological cancers (such as lymphoma and leukemia).  This study, based on the Million Women’s Study in the UK, is large enough to permit an evaluation of associations with various types of such cancers.  Further, it takes into account newer coding systems for morphology so that diseases associated with the lymphatic system can be separated from those of the myeloid system.

The key findings are that alcohol consumption appears to lower the risk of several types of lymphoma and plasma cell neoplasms, but has little effect on the risk of myeloid tumors such as acute myeloid leukemia.  Smoking is associated with an increase in risk for most such cancers.

Forum reviewers considered this to be a very well-done analysis, and the ability of the authors to separate the effects on lymphoid and myeloid cancers is important.  Forum members emphasize the strong differences in effect of smoking (an increase) and alcohol consumption (a decrease) on the risk of these cancers.  They support future research to discover the mechanisms by which moderate drinking may lower such risk.

Reference:  Kroll ME, Murphy F, Pirie K, Reeves GK, Green J, Beral V, for the Million Women Study Collaborators.  Alcohol drinking, tobacco smoking and subtypes of haematological malignancy in the UK Million Women Study.  British Journal of Cancer 2012;107:879–887.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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A Tribute to Serge Renaud

(1927 – 2012)

It is with sorrow that we have learned of the death in France on 28 October 2012 of Professor Serge Renaud at 84 years of age.  In addition to being a colleague and close friend of many of us, he was celebrated as a pioneer in scientific research on the prevention of cardiovascular and other diseases.  His innovative mind opened up new fields of inquiry that have greatly broadened research into the role of wine, alcohol, fatty acids, and other nutrients in preserving health and preventing disease.  For his many contributions to science, on July 14, 2005, Serge received France’s highest distinction, the Legion d’Honneur.

Over many decades, Professor Renaud was the scientist who initiated much of the work relating the consumption of wine and other types of alcohol to cardiovascular disease and other of the diseases associated with ageing.  He was the scientist most associated with the role of red wine in protecting the French from coronary artery disease (the “French Paradox”), and a leading figure in studying how other dietary factors relate to health.  His innovative concepts have sometimes taken many years to be appreciated by other scientists.  He made a major contribution with his research demonstrating how alpha-linolenic acid, monounsaturated fats, and other components of the “Cretan-type Mediterranean Diet,” play key roles in promoting health.

Serge Renaud was born in Cartelègue, Haute Gironde, France, and after starting his medical training in France moved to Montreal, Canada, and later to Boston, Massachusetts, USA.  He returned to France in 1973 and became director of the INSERM unit in Lyon, France, where much of his research was carried out.

In an excellent tribute to Renaud in the Lancet in 2000, Bruno Simini pointed out his major contributions investigating the association between wine, diet, and thrombosis.  Simini quotes Serge as saying: “If I hadn’t lived with my grandparents and great-grandparents on a vineyard near Bordeaux, perhaps this idea wouldn’t have occurred to me.  When you see people reach the age of 80 or 90 years, who have been drinking small amounts of wine every day, you don’t believe wine in low doses is harmful.”1

In 1991, Serge Renaud appeared on the popular US television program, “60 Minutes,” in a segment entitled the “French Paradox.”  When asked by Morley Safer, the host, what was the real reason that the French have rates of coronary artery disease so much lower than those in other developed nations, Renaud replied: “I think it is the alcohol.”  And when Morley Safer closed the segment holding a glass of red wine and saying, “The protection of the French from heart disease may rest in this inviting glass,” the response in the US was remarkable – nothing such as this had ever been stated in the country that earlier in the century had made any alcohol consumption illegal through nation-wide prohibition.  Following the television program, sales of red wine rose immediately by 40 per cent!

In addition to his studies on wine and alcohol, Professor Renaud, noting the very low rates of heart disease among participants from Crete in the “Seven Countries Study,” initiated the Lyon Diet Heart Study in 1985 to determine the effects of a diet based on that of Crete on the course of disease among patients who already had coronary disease.  There were very dramatic reductions in subsequent coronary problems and in total mortality among subjects given the “Cretan-type diet,” which contained increased levels of an omega-3 fatty acid (alpha-linolenic acid) to replace some of the fats from meat and dairy products.

As quoted in the Lancet tribute by Simini, Professor Renaud said the results of these studies on heart disease and cardiac arrhythmias made him “wonder about the origins of civilisations.  It is intriguing that ancient Asian and Mediterranean civilisations used natural oils in cooking—colza and olive—with similar fatty acid compositions.”  [Colza oil is closely related to the widely used rapeseed oil and canola oil.]  And because of his belief in ancient wisdom when it comes to diet and health, Renaud ends his book Le régime santé2 with a warning: “Don’t look for a pill that replaces [the Cretan diet]. There is no such thing.”

People around the world have profited, and will continue to profit, from the lifelong scientific work of Serge Renaud.  For those of us who knew and worked with him, we cherish our memories of Serge the person, and of Serge the consummate scientist.  As stated so well by a Forum member, “We are all in debt to Serge for the lesson he gave to our scientific community: curiosity as the sole reason to investigate, diligence in observing the facts, unbiased stringency in interpreting results, and, definitely not least, the modesty that only a great man can have.  We shall keep him in our memory as an example and a mentor of the meaning of being a scientist.”

References

1.  Simini B.  Serge Renaud: From French Paradox to Cretan miracle.  The Lancet 2000;335:48. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(05)71990-5.

2.  Renaud S.  Le régime santé.  Odile Jacob, Paris, 1998.

These comments provided by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research  (www.bu.edu/alcohol-forum)

31 October 2012

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Critique 094:  The complex association between moderate alcohol consumption and breast cancer   — 23 October 2012

An excellent review article from two scientists at the National Institue on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism describes the epidemiologic and basic scientific evidence linking alcohol consumption to the risk of breast cancer.  The authors point out deficiencies in the epidemiologic data, especially that the pattern of drinking (regular moderate versus binge drinking) has generally not been taken into consideration (and the latter pattern can be associated with much higher blood alcohol concentrations).  Further, epidemiologic studies usually provide data for only a short period of time, while the development of cancer may relate to exposures over many decades.  The authors also comment upon the effect that under-reporting of alcohol by study participants could exaggerate effects on cancer risk from light drinking.  They discuss two hypotheses that could relate alcohol to breast cancer risk: alcohol as a breast tumor promoter, and alcohol as a weak cumulative breast carcinogen, and present evidence from epidemiology and basic science that would relate to each hypothesis.

Overall, Forum reviewers were enthusiastic about this review paper, considering that it clearly outlined some of the difficulties scientists have in determining the causes of cancer.  They agreed with the authors’ statements regarding the necessity to consider the overall net effects of moderate drinking, including reductions in the risk of cardiovascular disease and total mortality.  They also agreed that future epidemiologic studies should focus on the pattern of drinking (and not just the average weekly amount of alcohol), and with their suggestions for future animal studies.  One Forum reviewer cautioned that our understanding of  the causes of breast cancer is still very incomplete, limiting our ability to provide well-founded recommendations to the public regarding moderate drinking as it relates to breast cancer risk.

Reference:  Brooks PJ, Zakhari S.  Moderate alcohol consumption and breast cancer in women: From epidemiology to mechanisms and interventions.  Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2012; pre-publication: DOI: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2012.01888.x.

For the full critique of this article by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 093:  Is moderate alcohol consumption associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation among patients with cardiovascular disease?   — 8 October 2012

An analysis of the association of alcohol consumption with the development of atrial fibrillation (AF) among subjects with coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD) was based on subjects in two large antihypertensive drug treatment trials.  Previous research in the general population has suggested an increase in the risk of the development of AF for heavy drinkers, and the present study shows such an association among subjects who already have CVD.

Among subjects in this study (all of whom had previous CVD), the authors also report that even “moderate” drinkers had a higher risk of AF than low-alcohol consumers, although the risk of death during follow up of moderate drinkers (9.9%) was lower than that of subjects reporting low-levels of drinking(12.5%).  Excluding binge drinkers, the estimated risk of AF was about 13% higher in moderate drinkers than among subjects classified as low-alcohol consumers.

While the multiple analyses in this paper were done appropriately, Forum reviewers were concerned about two aspects of this study.  First, there was concern about the wide range the authors chose for the category of “moderate” drinkers, which included subjects reporting from 1 drink per week up through those reporting 21 drinks per week for men and 14 drinks per week for women.  It would have been useful to present results also for subjects who met more common definitions for moderate drinking: no more than 14 drinks/week for men and 7 drinks/week for women, the values used to define moderate drinking in the United States, Australia, and many other countries.  Unfortunately, there is a conspicuous absence of data in this paper of the effects on the risk of AF of subjects consuming alcohol “moderately” by these standards.

Another major concern about these analyses relates to potential bias in the estimates from what is known as index event bias or collider bias.  Given that alcohol intake prior to enrollment in this study may well have related to subjects’ development of cardiovascular disease, it is problematic to judge the effects of alcohol after a cardiovascular event on the subsequent risk of AF, a condition frequently associated with CVD.

All subjects in these analyses had already developed CVD (the prerequisite for being in the present study).  Thus, the study included those who consumed alcohol prior to the diagnosis of CVD or diabetes and those who did not drink prior to these diagnoses.  Given that moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to reduce substantially the risk of both CVD and diabetes, it can be assumed that subjects in this study who developed CVD despite being drinkers had other risk factors contributing to the disease that overcame any “protection” afforded by alcohol consumption.  Unless adjusted for, these other risk factors could well affect the subsequent course of subjects following the onset of CVD, including the development of AF.  A similar phenomenon has been seen for obesity (the “obesity paradox”), aspirin use (the “aspirin paradox”), and other exposures, where the associations with CVD seen prior to the initial development of the disease differ from those seen after the development of CVD.

It is clear from many previous studies in the general population that heavy alcohol intake and binge drinking increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation.  This cardiac arrhythmia is a common component of the “holiday heart” syndrome that may occur after very heavy bouts of drinking.  As for the effects on the risk of atrial fibrillation from moderate drinking, as studied in this paper, there were a number of concerns from Forum reviewers about the analyses and results.  They raise questions about the conclusions of the authors that even “moderate” drinking results in an increased risk of atrial fibrillation after the development of cardiovascular disease.  Especially when defined as no more than 14 drinks per week for men or 7 drinks per week for women, the association between “moderate” alcohol consumption and atrial fibrillation remains unclear.

Reference:  Liang Y, Mente A, Yusuf S, Gao P, Sleight P, Zhu J, Fagard R, Lonn E, Teo KK; for the ONTARGET and TRANSCEND Investigators.  Alcohol consumption and the risk of incident atrial fibrillation among people with cardiovascular disease.  CMAJ 2012.  DOI:10.1503/cmaj.120412.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 092: The association of alcohol and tobacco with age at diagnosis among subjects with pancreatic cancer   — 2 October 2012

This analysis from a group of distinguished scientists supports previous research showing that smoking is associated with an earlier onset of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.  Other research has shown that smoking may also be a causative factor in the development of this type of cancer.  For alcohol, this study shows that heavy drinking also appears to be associated with earlier diagnosis; previous research from some epidemiologic studies has suggested further that heavy intake of alcohol may be associated with the development of pancreatic cancer.

Forum reviewers were concerned, however, about potential bias in regards to the time of diagnosis of such cancer, and about many other limitations of the study.  For example, the inability to separate drinkers by the pattern of drinking (binge drinking versus regular, moderate intake), by the socioeconomic status of subjects, and by a lack of information on chronic pancreatitis, a known risk factor, weaken the implications of this paper.  Forum members do not think that the results of this study will have a large impact on clinical practice, or on measures for the prevention of pancreatic cancer.

Reference:  Anderson MA; Zolotarevsky E; Cooper KL; Sherman S; Shats O; Whitcomb DC; Lynch HT; et al.  Alcohol and tobacco lower the age of presentation in sporadic pancreatic cancer in a dose-dependent manner: A multicenter study.  Am J Gastroenterol 2012; advance online publication, doi: 10.1038/ajg.2012.288

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 091:  Light drinking may relate to increase in risk for certain cancers   — 18 September 2012

A meta-analysis by a distinguished group of scientists was designed to determine if “light drinking” (defined as an average of up to 1 drink per day) was associated with the risk of certain cancers that have been shown in previous studies to be associated with the risk of cancer.  The authors concluded that while the risk of these cancers was only slightly increased from such drinking, there were detectable increases in cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, esophagus and female breast.  They report no increase in the risk of cancers of the colorectum, liver, and larynx to be associated with such drinking.

Forum reviewers were concerned about a number of aspects of this study.  While the statistical methodology was correct and done appropriately, the fact that the investigators (1) included both ex-drinkers and never drinkers in the reference group; (2) could not separate the effects of regular light drinking from binge drinking; (3) had no data on the duration of alcohol consumption at different levels; (4) did not adjust their analyses according to geographic region or type of study (both of which had large estimated effects on cancer risk); and (5) did not adjust their estimates of effect by other lifestyle habits, including smoking.  All of these factors tend to weaken the implications of their results.

Forum reviewers were also concerned that despite the acknowledged limitations of their data, the authors present conclusions indicating that even light drinking increases the risk of certain cancers without commenting on the net health effects.  They present only the effects on cancer (which was the topic of the meta-analysis) but do not comment on the overall or net health effects of light drinking: a marked reduction in the risk of much more common diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases, and a longer lifespan.  Further, the lack of data on genetic patterns, folate intake, and other lifestyle factors makes it difficult to apply their findings to individual subjects.  The Forum considers that while their analyses may be helpful in understanding associations between alcohol and cancer, the many limitations of this study indicate that it can provide only incomplete information on light alcohol consumption to be used as a basis for making recommendations to the public.

Reference:  Bagnardi V, Rota M, Botteri E, Tramacere I, Islami F, Fedirko V, Scotti L, Jenab M, Turati F, Pasquali E, Pelucchi C, Bellocco R, Negri E, Corrao G, Rehm J, Boffetta P, La Vecchia C.  Light alcohol drinking and cancer: a meta-analysis.   Pre-publication: Annals of Oncology 2012; doi:10.1093/annonc/mds337

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 090:  Effects of stopping alcohol consumption on subsequent risk of esophageal cancer   — 13 September 2012

This paper provides an evaluation of the time following cessation of alcohol consumption that the risk of esophageal cancer returns to that of non-drinkers; it is based on 17 studies providing such information, 9 of which provided data for a meta-analysis.  The authors conclude that an alcohol-related increased risk of esophageal cancer is reversible following drinking cessation, most likely requiring up to 16 years.  The authors estimate that about one-half of the reduction in risk of cancer may occur within in a much shorter time, perhaps within about 4 or 5 years.

Forum reviewers considered this to be a well-done analysis.  Forum members emphasized, as did the authors, a number of limitations of the study.  Adjustments for smoking may not have been adequate: most upper aero-digestive cancers show a strong interaction between smoking and alcohol consumption in relation to cancer risk.  (For many “alcohol-related” cancers, there is little effect of alcohol consumption among non-smokers.)

Further, large differences in the alcohol-cancer association were shown in this study for different geographical regions (some associations being much higher in Asia than in Europe or North America), but such differences were not adjusted for in the main analyses.  The fact that the authors of this paper did not have data permitting the separation of ex-drinkers and never drinkers (both groups being included in the “non-drinker” category), and their inability to judge the effects of the baseline pattern of drinking (regular versus binge drinking), may also be limitations to the interpretation of their results.  Adjustment for such factors may have influenced the effects of stopping drinking on subsequent cancer risk, and markedly changed the calculated effects on the numbers of cancers prevented worldwide.

In any case, the fact that cessation of drinking may reduce the risk of esophageal cancer is of importance.  Other studies suggest further that just reducing the amount of alcohol consumed, rather than the complete cessation of drinking, may be associated with lowering of cancer risk, and low-level alcohol intake has been shown to have beneficial health effects on cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other medical conditions.

Reference:  Jarl J, Gerdtham Ulf-G.  Time pattern of reduction in risk of oesophageal cancer following alcohol cessation — a meta-analysis.  Addiction, 107, 1234–1243. doi:10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03772.x

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 089:  Combination of hormone treatments and alcohol consumption influences the risk of breast cancer in women   — 29 August 2012

An analysis among more than 40,000 postmenopausal women who were in the California Teachers Study was carried out to determine if there were differences in risk of breast cancer among women consuming alcohol according to their previous or current use of hormone therapy (HT).  In the cohort, 660 women were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer during follow up.

Results from multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models showed an increase in risk of breast cancer among alcohol consumers of more than 20 grams of alcohol per day (about 1 ½ to 2 typical drinks) who were current users of HT but not among those who were ex-users of HT.  The authors conclude: “Following the cessation of HT use, alcohol consumption is not significantly associated with breast cancer risk, although a non-significant increased risk was observed among women who never used HT.  Our findings confirm that concurrent exposure to HT and alcohol has a substantial adverse impact on breast cancer risk.  However, after HT cessation, this risk is reduced.”

Forum reviewers considered this to be a very well-done analysis on a large group of post-menopausal women with repeated assessments of alcohol consumption and HT use.  However, results from even very large studies on the relation between alcohol, HT, and breast cancer risk have often been conflicting.  Even with numerous studies on this topic, we still have very poor predictors of which women will develop breast cancer.  There is some increase in risk for women with a family history of such cancers and those who are obese.  However, the percentage increases in risk associated with HT, alcohol consumption, and other environmental factors are generally small (unlike the many-fold increase in the risk of lung cancer among smokers in comparison with never smokers).  This may explain why the results of individual studies may reach apparently conflicting conclusions.  While the present study suggests that women who consume alcohol may have a decrease in their risk of breast cancer if they stop taking hormone replacement therapy, our current understanding of factors affecting breast cancer risk remains quite inadequate.

Reference:  Horn-Ross PL, Canchola AJ, Bernstein L, Clarke CA, Lacey JV, Neuhausen SL, Reynolds P, Ursin G.  Alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women following the cessation of hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study.  Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2012. [Epub ahead of print]

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 088:  Higher levels of alcohol intake may slightly increase risk of age-related macular degeneration, with no effect from moderate drinking 22 August 2012

An analysis based on the follow up of more than 20,000 participants recruited in 1990-1994 for the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study in Australia related alcohol consumption at baseline to the subsequent development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of blindness in the elderly.  At a follow-up examination between 2003 and 2007, digital macula photographs of both eyes were taken and evaluated for early and late AMD signs; there were 2,663 cases of early AMD and 121 cases of late AMD identified.

The authors report: “Drinking more than 20 g of alcohol per day was associated with an approximate 20% increase in the odds of early AMD (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.38; P = 0.004) when compared with those who reported no alcohol intake at baseline.”  (An average of 20 grams/day of alcohol is the equivalent of about 2 daily drinks by British standards or 1 ½ drinks by US standards.)  The analyses show that the increased risk was almost exclusively among smokers, with no significant effect among non-smokers who consumed any amount of alcohol.

Forum reviewers had some concern that approximately one-half of this “population-based” study did not have measurements for AMD; these included those who had died during the follow-up period (and deaths were more common among non-drinkers than among drinkers).  Further, the authors focus only on the slight increase in risk of AMD seen for heavier drinkers, but do not emphasize that among never smokers there was no increase in risk for consumers of any amount of alcohol.  Their results suggest a possible interaction between smoking and alcohol consumption in the etiology of this disease.

The findings of no effect (either positive or negative) from drinking < 20 g/day of alcohol in this study does not support some earlier reports of reduced risk of AMD among moderate wine drinkers.  In the present study, there were no detectable differences in effect between the consumption of wine or of beer.  A key point of this study may be that never-smokers do not show increased risk of AMD with alcohol consumption.

Reference:  Adams MKM, Chong EW, Williamson E, Aung KZ, Makeyeva GA, Giles GG, English DR, Hopper J, Guymer RH, Baird PN, Robman LD, Simpson JA.  20/20—Alcohol and age-related macular degeneration: The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.  Am J Epidemiol 2012;176:289-298.

For the full critique of this article by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 087:  Smoking increases, while alcohol consumption may decrease, the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)   — 8 August 2012

Reference:  de Jong SW, Huisman MHB, Sutedja NA, van der Kooi, AJ, de Visser M, Schelhaas HJ, Fischer K, Veldink JH, van den Berg LH.  Smoking, alcohol consumption, and the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis:A population-based study.  Am J Epidemiol 2012;176:233–239

A population-based case-control study of the rare but devastating neurological disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has shown that the risk of such disease is increased among smokers, as has been shown previously.  However, surprisingly, the risk of ALS was found to be markedly lower among consumers of alcohol than among abstainers.

Forum reviewers thought that this was a well-done and important paper, as it is a population-based analysis, with almost 500 cases of ALS, a very large number of cases for this rare disease.  They were especially struck by the magnitude of the difference in risk of ALS between alcohol consumers and never drinkers: the risk among drinkers was about one half that of non-drinkers.  Said one reviewer: “The results in this study are astonishing in this mysterious disease.  One should expect that alcohol, as a toxic agent, rather should contribute to the development of ALS than to prevent it.  The lower risk among drinkers compared with non-drinkers is remarkable”

Forum reviewers cautioned that the results of this paper should not be used to prompt people to consume alcohol just to prevent ALS, as it is such a rare disease.  However, this paper presents important data that could help scientists understand the etiology of ALS and perhaps other more common diseases.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 086:  Mechanisms for a beneficial effect of moderate alcohol consumption on osteoporosis in women   — 1 August 2012

Women after menopause tend to develop weaker bones from what is known as osteoporosis, which may lead to fractures (especially hip fractures) from falling.  The weakness of the bones results from an imbalance between the normal resorption (a type of dissolving of old bone) and the laying down of new bone, an ongoing process for both men and women referred to as “bone turnover.”  For poorly understood reasons, after menopause the resorption of old bone in women continues but new bone is laid down less well, leading to a decrease in the density of bone.  A variety of substances (calcium, vitamin D, various medications) have been used in an attempt to prevent the development of osteoporosis; in epidemiologic studies, moderate drinking of alcohol has been shown to lower this risk.

An intervention trial evaluating the association of alcohol intake with indices of bone metabolism shows beneficial effects of moderate alcohol intake on factors that relate to osteoporosis in post-menopausal women.  The authors state that excessive bone turnover, combined with an imbalance whereby bone resorption exceeds bone formation, is the principal cause of post-menopausal bone loss.  This study among 40 healthy post-menopausal women investigated the hypothesis that moderate alcohol intake (an average of 19 grams per day, or approximately 1 and ½ typical drinks per day in this study) attenuates bone turnover after menopause.  Measurements were carried out while the women were consuming alcohol, after they had stopped drinking as part of the trial, and following resumption of alcohol.  The study showed that abstinence from alcohol resulted in increased markers of bone turnover (hence, higher risk of developing osteoporosis), whereas resumption of alcohol reduced bone turnover markers.

Forum reviewers considered this to be an innovative and well-done study.  The key questions raised were how alcohol may affect bone metabolism in a longer period of time than was tested in this study.  Reviewers realized that such long-term intervention trials are very difficult and expensive to carry out.  On the other hand, many prospective epidemiologic studies in the elderly have shown greater bone mineral density and a lower risk of fractures among regular moderate drinkers than among abstainers.  The most important aspect of this study may be that it has helped identify cellular mechanisms for the increased bone density observed in post-menopausal women who are moderate alcohol consumers.

Reference:  Marrone JA, Maddalozzo GF, Branscum AJ, Hardin K, Cialdella-Kam L, Philbrick KA, Breggia AC, Rosen CJ, Turner RT, Iwaniec UT.  Moderate alcohol intake lowers biochemical markers of bone turnover in postmenopausal women.  Menopause 2012;19: DOI: 10.1097/gme.0b013e31824ac071

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research and other invited scientists, please click here.

(Note: an ADDENDUM to the original Forum critique has been added on 15 August 2012.)

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Critique 085:  Moderate alcohol intake is associated with a lower risk of kidney cancer  — 19 July 2012

A majority of previous epidemiologic studies have shown that moderate drinking is associated with a lower risk of kidney cancer, which may affect about 1% of the general population.  In published prospective cohort studies, the risk for such cancer among moderate drinkers is usually about 25% less than the risk seen among non-drinkers.

This well-done meta-analysis supports these findings: for the more-reliable prospective cohort studies (rather than case-control studies) the current study finds a 29% lower risk for subjects in the highest category of alcohol consumption in comparison with subjects in the lowest alcohol category.  The findings suggest similar effects among men and women, and for all types of alcohol beverages.  The effects are seen at a level of about one drink/day, with little further reduction in risk for greater alcohol consumption.

Reference:  Song DY, Song S, Song Y, Lee JE.  Alcohol intake and renal cell cancer risk: a meta-analysis.  British Journal of Cancer 2012;106:1881–1890.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 084:  Moderate drinking lowers risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in women  — 17 July 2012

A follow-up study of more than 34,000 women in Sweden has shown that moderate drinkers, in comparison with abstainers, were at significantly lower risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an often serious and disabling type of arthritis.  RA is known to relate to inflammation, and it is postulated that this is blocked to some degree by the consumption of alcohol.  In this study, women who consumed at least 4 drinks per week (with a drink being defined as containing 15 grams of alcohol) had 37% lower risk of developing RA than subjects reporting never drinking or consuming less than 1 drink/week.

This large study is important as few prospective studies are of adequate size to have sufficient cases of RA to evaluate factors related to its development.  The study supports previous research showing a lower risk of developing RA, or milder severity of the disease, among moderate drinkers than among abstainers.

Reference:  Di Giuseppe D, Alfredsson L, Bottai M, Askling J, Wolk A.  Long term alcohol intake and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in women: a population based cohort study.  BMJ 2012;345:e4230 doi: 10.1136/bmj.e4230 (Published 10 July 2012)

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 083: Higher indices of quality of life are seen among persistent moderate drinkers than among abstainers  –  20 June 2012

Data from a nationally representative sample of 5,404 community-dwelling Canadians ages 50 and older at baseline (1994/1995) was used to estimate the effects of alcohol drinking patterns on indices of quality of life, at baseline (when subjects were aged ≥50 years) and after a follow-up period.  Health-related quality of life was assessed with the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3).  The authors report that most participants showed stable alcohol-consumption patterns over 6 years.  Persistent regular moderate drinkers had the highest indices of quality of life at baseline, but subsequent changes in HUI3 were similar in all groups except those reporting decreasing alcohol consumption.  The investigators conclude that persistent moderate drinkers had higher initial levels of health-related quality of life than persistent nonusers and those in other groups.  However, rates of decline over time were similar for all groups except those decreasing their consumption, which had a greater decline in their level of health-related quality of life than  persistent moderate users. While Forum reviewers admired the intent of this study, there were concerns about some of the statistical and epidemiologic aspects.  The reasons that some people stopped drinking or decreased their intake were not known; while the authors state that subjects decreasing their alcohol consumption had a more rapid decline in quality of life measures, it is not known what percentage of such subjects decreased alcohol intake due to the development of serious  iseases.  If this were the case, such diseases may have been more important in their subsequent adverse health than the change in their drinking habits.

Further, the “baseline” quality of life measures in this study were obtained when subjects were aged 50 or older; this baseline value of quality of life was higher in moderate drinkers.   However, there are statistical problems if adjustments are made for this when quality of life is assessed subsequently and related to drinking pattern.  Peto has described this problem as a “horse-racing effect.”  He states that in prospective studies, the correlation between exposures (e.g., drinking pattern)  and outcomes (e.g., quality of life) assessments during follow up are likely to be the same as the outcome at the end of follow up.  As an analogy he uses a race between ‘slow’ and ‘fast’ horses; it is likely that the fast horses will be ahead at the mid-point of the race as well as at the end.  Environmental effects on quality of life begin early in life, and if one adjusts for the mid-life value (as done and referred to as “baseline” in the present study), you may end up disregarding much of the effect of subsequent alcohol intake.

Overall, this study shows a positive relation between moderate alcohol intake and quality of life in middle-aged adults.  The effects on the subsequent quality of life as one ages of continued alccohol consumption, or of decreasing intake, remain unclear.

Reference:  Kaplan MS, Huguet N, Feeny D, McFarland BH, Caetano R, Bernier J, Giesbrecht N, Oliver L, Ross N.  Alcohol Use Patterns and Trajectories of Health-Related Quality of Life in Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A 14-Year Population-Based Study.  J. Stud Alcohol Drugs 2012;73:581–590.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 082:  A statistical model attempting to estimate the level of alcohol consumption that is “optimal” for health  –  6 June 2012

Scientists from Australia and Oxford University have carried out a complex analysis in an attempt to determine the “optimal” level of alcohol consumption that is associated with the lowest rates of chronic disease in the UK.  They conclude that the intake of about one-half of a typical drink per day would result in the healthiest outcomes, and the authors conclude that the recommended alcohol intake for the UK should be reduced from the current advised level of drinking.

There were a number of concerns by Forum members about the paper.  It is based on an extremely complex statistical model that requires many assumptions, most of which cannot be validated.  The parameters chosen to use in such a model determine the results, and a number of instances were identified where the values used in this analysis do not reflect current scientific knowledge.  Further, the conclusions of the authors are based exclusively on the lowest point of the “J-shaped” curve for alcohol and disease, and disregard the findings that the risk of death, in comparison with non-drinkers, remains lower for drinkers of alcohol of up to several drinks per day.

There were other aspects of the paper that were of particular concern: (1) focusing only on the average amount of alcohol consumed, while the pattern of drinking (regular moderate versus binge drinking) has the greatest effect on health outcomes; (2) giving a single recommended level of alcohol intake irrespective of age; the greatest risks and lowest expected benefits of alcohol intake are among the young, whereas most of the putative health benefits relate to the diseases of ageing; (3) giving a single value for both men and women, since women are known to react (both adversely and beneficially) to lower levels of alcohol than do men; (4) the use of their estimated value alone for making recommendations for the population; guidelines should be based on a large number of social and behavioral factors, not just on the results of one scientific study.

The level of alcohol that is most likely to be associated with the lowest risk of adverse health outcomes and the most likely health benefits varies markedly among individuals.  Middle-aged men and post-menopausal women are most likely to demonstrate enhanced health (e.g., lower risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, dementia) from moderate drinking.  For all ages, binge drinking is associated with predominantly adverse outcomes.  In general, women should drink less than men.  While the analyses presented in this paper are of scientific interest, they alone do not support changes in the current population recommendations for alcohol consumption.

Reference:  Nichols M, Scarborough P, Allender S, Rayner M.  What is the optimal level of population alcohol consumption for chronic disease prevention in England?  Modelling the impact of changes in average consumption levels.  BMJ Open 2012;2:e000957.  doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2012-000957.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 081:  Alcohol intake in the elderly affects risk of cognitive decline and dementia  — 22 May 2012

A well-done review paper on the association between alcohol consumption and cognition in the elderly provides an excellent summary of potential mechanisms by which alcohol may affect cognitive function and the risk of dementia, both adversely and favorably.  Current scientific data indicate that heavy drinking is associated with an increased risk of neurological disease and dysfunction, while regular light-to-moderate alcohol intake seems to be associated with a reduced risk of such dysfunction, including a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

At present, the mechanisms by which the moderate intake of wine and other alcoholic beverages reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases are much better defined than they are for cognition.  Forum members agree with the authors that further research is needed to evaluate a potential role that wine and other alcoholic beverages may play in reducing the risk of dementia.  Forum members also agree that, at present, the specific mechanisms of such putative protection are not well defined, and it would be premature to recommend light-to-moderate drinking for reducing the risk of dementia.  On the other hand, current epidemiologic and biomedical data suggest that most elderly subjects who are responsible and moderate drinkers would not benefit from being advised to stop their alcohol consumption.

Reference:  Kim JW, Lee DY, Lee BC, Jung MH, Kim H, Choi YS, Choi I-G.  Alcohol and Cognition in the Elderly: A Review.  Psychiatry Investig 2012;9:8-16;  On-line: http://dx.doi.org/10.4306/pi.2012.9.1.8

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 080:  Modest alcohol intake is associated with less inflammation among patients with the most common type of liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)   — 15 May 2012

NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) is the most common type of liver disease in the developed world, affecting up to one-third of the US population.  NAFLD is often associated with obesity and other parameters of the so-called “metabolic syndrome,” which is a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease.  In a well-done study among subjects with NAFLD, the investigators have demonstrated that modest alcohol consumption (an average of up to 20 grams of alcohol per day and no binge drinking) is associated with less evidence of inflammation of the liver (steatohepatitis), a condition known to markedly increase the risk of progression of liver disease to cirrhosis.

Given that NAFLD and other conditions associated with the metabolic syndrome are so common, and are major risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease, the results of the present study are important.  They show that modest drinking is associated with decreased, not increased, inflammation of the liver.  Further, even among subjects with NAFLD, cardiovascular disease is a much more common cause of death than liver disease.  The authors suggest that intervention studies should be done to support their findings; if confirmed, subjects with NAFLD should not be advised to avoid all alcohol, which is the current advice usually given to such patients.

Reference:  Dunn W, Sanyal AJ, Brunt EM, Unalp-Arida A, Donohue M, McCullough AJ, Schwimmer JB.  Modest alcohol consumption is associated with decreased prevalence of steatohepatitis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).  Journal of Hepatology 2012 (pre-publication release)

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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A Tribute to Federico Leighton Puga, MD    —   8 May 2012

Frederico Leighton Puga, MD, Professor and Director of the Center for Molecular Nutrition and Chronic Diseases of the Catholic University of Chile in Santiago, died on 27 April 2012 at the age of 74 years.  Dr. Leighton was a valued member of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, and was noted for his seminal work in nutrition, antioxidants, the health aspects of moderate wine consumption, and public health approaches for the prevention of chronic diseases.

Many Forum members knew and had worked with Dr. Leighton through many decades.  All feel a deep loss, of a great scientist, a loyal and good friend, and someone very concerned with the health of people everywhere.  As stated by one Forum member, “Federico was a great scientist motivated by curiosity and the desire to be useful for his country.  His culture and education and intellectual rigor were well integrated into his humanity and the sweetness of his character.”  Said another: “Federico had in abundance that indefinable quality known as ‘class.’”  The world has lost an honest and honorable scientist.

For the full tribute to Dr. Leighton by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 079:  Moderate alcohol consumption both prior to, and following, a myocardial infarction is associated with lower risk of mortality  –  17 April 2012

In a very well-done analysis based on the follow up of more than 50,000 subjects from The Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS), 1,818 men were confirmed with incident non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI).  Among MI survivors, 468 deaths were documented during up to 20 years of follow up.  Repeated reports were obtained on alcohol consumption  throughout follow up.  Average alcohol consumption was calculated prior to and then following the MI.

The overall results show that, in comparison with no alcohol consumption, the pre-MI and the post-MI intakes of light (0.1-9.9 g/day) and moderate (10.0-29.9 g/d) amounts of alcohol were both associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular morality among these men.  The significant reductions in all-cause mortality risk (22% lower for 0.1-9.9 g/day and 34% lower for 10.0 – 29.9 g/day, in comparison with non-drinkers) were no longer present for consumers of ≥ 30 g/day; for this highest consumer group, the adjusted hazard ratio was 0.87 with 95% CI of 0.61-1.25.

There are a number of other informative and interesting results described from this study.   First, there was little change in reported alcohol prior to and following the MI: drinkers tended to remain drinkers of similar amounts.  Few non-drinkers began to drink after their MI; among heavier drinkers, there was a tendency to decrease the amount somewhat (but very few stopped drinking completely).  Further there were no significant differences in outcome according to type of beverage consumed although, interestingly, lower hazard ratios were seen for consumers of beer and liquor than of wine.  While the authors state that the effects of alcohol were stronger for the association with non-anterior MIs, the HRs for all-cause mortality were little different: among the moderately drinking men the HRs were 0.58 for anterior MI and 0.51 for other types of MI.

Even though exposures (such as alcohol) for cardiovascular events (such as MI and  cardiovascular mortality) may be different after a person has an event than it was before the event, in this study the reductions in risk were almost the same.  For example, both for alcohol intake reported prior to a MI, and that after a non-fatal MI, the risk of mortality was about 30% lower for moderate drinkers than it was for abstainers.  This suggests that, in terms of reducing cardiovascular disease, alcohol may have relatively short-term effects.  Frequent consumption (of moderate amounts) may result in the best health outcomes.

Reference:  Pai JK, Mukamal KJ, Rimm EB.  Long-term alcohol consumption in relation to all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among survivors of myocardial infarction: the Health Professionals Follow-up Study.  European Heart Journal 2012;doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehs047

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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 Critique 078:  An update on the association of alcohol consumption with risk of breast cancer  — 10 April 2012

An excellent review paper on the relation of alcohol consumption to the risk of breast cancer concludes that, overall, there is a positive dose-response relation between alcohol drinking and the risk of breast cancer.  The analysis shows that an increase in risk is seen even among women reporting an average of only about one drink/day.  Given the high prevalence of such light drinking in most female populations, the authors estimate that up to 1 to 2% of breast cancers in Europe and North America may be attributable to light drinking alone.  Thus, while alcohol appears to be a risk factor for breast cancer, it does not explain a very high percentage of cases.

Forum members considered this to be a well-done analysis, with a good review not only of epidemiologic studies but of potential mechanisms of effect of alcohol on breast cancer risk.  An increase in estrogen levels from alcohol seems to be the physiologic mechanism most commonly suggested for the increase in risk.

The meta-analysis is noteworthy in presenting risks specifically for women who consume up to one drink/day, which is the common pattern for a high proportion of women in western cultures.  On the other hand, the authors herefailed to discuss the potential modification of alcohol effects on cancer risk from folate in the diet; in many studies, high folate levels tend to diminish or eliminate an increase in risk from alcohol.  Further, the paper does not provide a discussion of the net effects of moderate drinking on mortality.  In older women, the decrease in the risk of cardiovascular disease (a much more common cause of death than breast cancer), greatly exceeds the potential increase in risk of death from breast cancer.

Reference:  Seitz HK, Pelucchi C, Bagnardi V, La Vecchia C.  Epidemiology and Pathophysiology of Alcohol and Breast Cancer: Update 2012.  Alcohol and Alcoholism 2012; doi: 10.1093/alcalc/ags011

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

 

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Critique 077:  Swedish study supports a “U-shaped” association of alcohol consumption with risk of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus  –  29 March 2012

Subjects in a cohort in Sweden, some of whom had been exposed to a community intervention program to prevent diabetes, were evaluated 8-10 years after baseline for the presence of diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose metabolism (“pre-diabetes”) in relation to a baseline report of alcohol consumption.  Approximately 2,000 men and 3,000 women had a normal glucose tolerance test at baseline; of these 105 men and 57 women developed type II diabetes.  Of subjects with pre-diabetes at baseline, 175 men and 98 women progressed to diabetes.  The authors report that total alcohol consumption and binge drinking increased the risk of pre-diabetes and diabetes in men, while low consumption decreased diabetes risk in women.  However, the authors did not discuss the fact that in essentially all comparisons, the highest risk of diabetes or pre-diabetes was among abstainers.

Forum reviewers had some concerns about the study.  For example, the study included some subjects who had been exposed to an intervention trial to prevent diabetes, yet no information is given on potential effects of the intervention.  It was not a population-based group.  Also, the sample was “enriched” with subjects who had a positive family history of diabetes, which may make it more difficult to judge the effects of environmental factors.  Ex-drinkers and never drinkers were included in the abstainer group.

It appears that the authors focused only on the “statistically significant” results rather than commenting on the overall pattern of association (lower risk of developing diabetes for moderate drinkers than for abstainers and heavier drinkers).  Further, the number of subjects in many of the sub-groups was very small, making it difficult to define specific cut-points for effects of alcohol on risk.

Nevertheless, reviewers considered that, overall, these analyses support the usual findings from previous research of a “U-shaped curve” for alcohol and diabetes for both men and women.  There appears to be a reduction in risk with moderate alcohol intake and possibly an increased risk for heavier drinking.

Reference:  Cullmann M, Hilding A, Östenson CG.  Alcohol consumption and risk of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes development in a Swedish population.  Diabet Med 2012;29:441–452.  DOI: 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2011.03450.x

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 076:  Evaluating the association of alcohol intake with cognitive functioning using a Mendelian randomization study design  — 22 March 2012

Many observational cohort studies have shown that moderate alcohol use is associated with better cognitive function.  However, since such studies are vulnerable to residual confounding by other lifestyle and physiologic factors, the authors conducted a Mendelian randomization study, using aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genotype (AA, GA, or GG) as an instrumental variable in 2-stage least squares analysis.  Cognitive function was assessed from delayed 10-word recall score (n = 4,707) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score (n = 2,284) among men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (2003–2008).  The authors had previously reported an association between reported alcohol intake and cognitive function  from a larger group of subjects from the same study finding that women reporting occasional alcohol intake and men reporting occasional or moderate intake had better scores related to cognitive function than did abstainers.1

In the present Mendelian study, the authors found no significant association between groups defined by the ALDH2 genotype (as an “unbiased” estimate of alcohol consumption) and the two measures of cognitive functioning.  A problem with the present analysis is that ALDH2 genotypes explained only 3% of the variance in reported alcohol intake, which weakens the conclusions of the authors.  Further, differences in the predominant type of beverage consumed (rice wine), and probably marked differences in drinking patterns between these subjects and Europeans and Americans, make it difficult to know what the implications of this study are for western industrialized societies.

We agree with the authors that “Causality should be thoroughly verified in a variety of settings using different kinds of evidence, including experimental or genetic studies, rather than relying on simple observations in a particular setting.”  We strongly support future attempts at using Mendelian  randomization studies, hopefully using better instruments for estimating alcohol intake.  On the other hand, as stated by recent evaluations of various study designs for determining causality,3 we appreciate that Mendelian randomization sounds good, but it is not the “Holy Grail.”

Reference:  Au Yeung SL, Jiang CQ, Cheng KK, Liu B, Zhang WS, Lam TH, Leung GM, Schooling CM.  Evaluation of moderate alcohol use and cognitive function among men using a Mendelian randomization design in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study.  Am J Epidemiol 2012; pre-publication release. DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwr462

Please click here for the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research.

 

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Critique 075:  Moderate drinking associated with lower risk of stroke in women  –  15 March 2012

A well-done analysis from the Nurses’ Health Study shows that the risk of total stroke is slightly lower among light-to-moderate consumers of alcohol than among subjects reporting no alcohol intake.  In comparison with non-drinkers, the estimated risk is 17-21% lower for women averaging up to 15 grams of alcohol per day (a little over one drink/day by US definitions of approximately 12 grams of alcohol for a typical “drink.”).  For consumers of larger amounts of alcohol, the risk of stroke has a tendency to be slightly increased, but not statistically significantly so.

Data on the pattern of drinking (regularly, binge, etc.) were not reported.  Among these predominantly light drinkers, there were no differences between effects on the risk of the most common type of stroke, ischemic stroke (due to atherosclerotic obstruction of a artery or an embolic clot) or the less-common hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain).

The results, with full adjustment for other factors that may affect risk, suggest a “J-shaped” curve for total stroke, with reductions in risk for light-to-moderate drinking and possibly an increase with greater amounts.  In this study, the point at which the risk of drinkers exceeds that of non-drinkers was about 38 grams of alcohol per day (the equivalent of about 3 typical “drinks”), with a 95% confidence interval of 28 to 57 grams/day.

The study supports many previous reports from observational epidemiologic studies that have shown a slight reduction in risk of the ischemic type of stroke from moderate alcohol intake.  Some, but not all previous studies, show an increase in hemorrhagic stroke for any amounts of alcohol, but that was not seen in this study, possibly because there were few heavy drinkers in this group of nurses.

Reference:  Jimenez M, Chiuve SE, Glynn RJ, Stampfer MJ, Camargo Jr CA, Willett WC, Manson JE, Rexrode KM.  Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Stroke in Women.  Stroke 2012, pre-publication.  http://stroke.ahajournals.org.  DOI: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.111.639435

Please click here for the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research.

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Critique 074:  Does moderate wine consumption improve lung function?  — 8 March 2012

An analysis based on a prospective study in the Netherlands assessed the impact of wine and resveratrol intake on lung function.  It also studied genetic factors (affecting sirtuin) that have been found to be mechanisms by which resveratrol relates to metabolism and longevity of life.  The authors report that resveratrol intake was associated with higher lung volumes and that white wine intake (but not red wine intake) was associated with lower risk of airway obstruction.  They report that the genetic factors studied did not relate to the associations found.

While several previous studies (as does this one) have reported that wine intake improves lung function, Forum reviewers were concerned about several aspects of the paper, and especially with the conclusions of the authors that resveratrol was the key factor in improved lung function.  A reviewer stated: “Resveratrol may well be just the bystander of something else present in wine.”  The beneficial effects on lung function are probably related to many compounds present in wine, and not just resveratrol.

Based on a number of scientific studies, moderate wine intake appears to have a favorable effect on lung function.  The doses of resveratrol seen in these epidemiologic studies are in the physiological range that could be expected from moderate wine consumption, unlike the huge doses of resveratrol being evaluated as a potential life-extending drug in pharmaceutical studies.

Reference:  Siedlinski M, Boer JMA, Smit HA, Postma DS, Boezen HM.  Dietary factors and lung function in the general population: wine and resveratrol intake.  Eur Respir J 2012; 39: 385–391;  DOI: 10.1183/09031936.00184110

Please click here for the full critique by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research.

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Critique 073: The association of alcohol consumption with osteoporosis  — 5 March 2012

Osteoporosis is a key underlying factor in fractures among the elderly, which are increasingly a major health problem.  A review paper from France on the association between alcohol consumption and bone metabolism states that heavy alcohol intake may adversely affect bone mineral density and increase the risk of osteoporosis.  It states that lighter drinking may actually improve bone density, but presents very limited data to support this statement.  Forum members were disappointed that the paper did not carry out a meta-analysis or other synthesis of the data; further, data from a number of key epidemiologic studies on the subject were not discussed in the paper.

The paper provides important information on the mechanisms by which alcohol may affect bone metabolism.  The authors describe effects of alcoholic beverages on bone density, bone microarchitecture, bone remodeling, and other mechanisms, which help explain how alcohol and polyphenols and other constituents of beer and wine may relate to the risk of fractures in the elderly.

Unfortunately, despite what the authors’ conclude, the paper does not provide a summation of the scientific data upon which public health policy can be based.  Overall, current scientific data suggest that bone mineral density and the risk of fractures are favorably affected by light-to-moderate drinking, but adversely affected by heavy drinking and alcoholism.

Reference:  Maurel DB, Boisseau N, Benhamou CL, Jaffre C.  Alcohol and bone: review of dose effects and mechanisms.  Osteoporos Int (2012) 23:1–16; DOI 10.1007/s00198-011-1787-7.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 072:  Obesity may modify the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer. 23 February 2012

A case-control study from Newfound/Labrador has reported that greater alcohol intake may increase the risk of colorectal cancer among obese subjects, but not among non-obese subjects.  This is not a particularly large study, and only 45-60% of subjects who were recruited by telephone ended up providing data.  Further, it is a case-control comparison, rather than a cohort analysis, making bias in the results more likely.

In this study, there was no relation of alcohol with the risk of CRC when considering the entire population.  However, when subjects were stratified by BMI (<30 versus ≥ 30), the data indicate an increase in CRC risk for obese subjects who were “drinkers” (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.0), especially among subjects reporting 5 or more drinks/daily (OR=3.7, CI 1.5-9.0).  On the other hand, even among obese subjects there was not a clear dose-response effect noted, i.e., there was not a step-wise increase in CRC risk with greater number of drinks/day  For example, the odds ratio (OR) was 2.3 times that of non-drinkers for obese subjects reporting 1-2 drinks/daily and 1.3 for those reporting 3-4 drinks/daily.

It will be interesting to determine if other studies show that there is modification of the association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer by obesity.  If such is the case, it could help understand some of the mechanisms for the development of cancer and provide better guidelines for screening for CRC.

Reference:  Zhao J, Zhu Y, Wang PP, et al.  Interaction between alcohol drinking and obesity in relation to colorectal cancer risk: a case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.  BMC Public Health 2012, 12:94 doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-94

Please click here for the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research.

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Critique 071:  Forum Comments on proposed new dietary guidelines for Australia  –  16 February 2012

Members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research have provided comments on the chapter related to alcohol intake that has been included in “A review of the evidence to address targeted questions to inform the revision of the Australian Dietary Guidelines,” by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing and National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), November 2011, ISBN Online 1864965304.

Forum members considered that the authors of the report should be commended on their work.  Criticisms are primarily about the restriction in the time frame of the review, and minimal consideration of key nuances, such as quantity of alcohol consumed and its relation to risk or benefit, patterns of drinking, the balance between risks and benefits, and making statements at all when the evidence is too weak.  More details (e.g. considering cardiovascular mechanisms to widen the search) would have added weight to the conclusions.

For the full comments of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 070:  Potentially important new mechanisms found for the anti-aging effects of resveratrol, a phenolic compound found in red wine  — 9 February 2012

A well-conducted experimental study in mice has provided potentially important new insights into the association of the intake of resveratrol and like compounds with health benefits.  Resveratrol is a constituent of red wine and other vegetable products, and is being evaluated in high-doses as a pharmaceutical.  The biologic mechanisms demonstrated in this study could provide key new approaches for the prevention or treatment of a number of chronic diseases in humans, especially those related to vascular and metabolic diseases and to the risk of mortality.

More than two decades ago, particularly through publicity related to the so-called “French Paradox,” the public became aware of the potential reduction in the risk of coronary heart disease from the moderate consumption of red wine, and the media focused on a single constituent in red wine, resveratrol, as being the “key” factor.  We now know that resveratrol is only one of hundreds of phenolic compounds in wine, many of which have been shown to have beneficial effects on vascular function, and that alcohol itself (present in wine, beer or spirits) also provides considerable protection against heart disease.  Still, there has remained considerable attention paid to resveratrol, and extensive scientific research on resveratrol and related  substances have shown that, in high doses, they may increase longevity of life and reduce metabolic diseases of aging.

In general, Forum reviewers thought that this was a very well-done study.  Their concerns related to the dose used in these experiments; while the levels of resveratrol and like compounds might be accessible with pharmaceutical doses, the suggestion that similar levels could be connected with wine consumption is misleading.  Further, in humans, resveratrol in the diet will interact with many other chemicals to achieve an effect, as whole plant extracts consist of many active and inactive micronutrients that may play a role in health and disease.  To ascribe a specific effect on health from one chemical found in wine or other plant products could be misleading.”

Still, the reviewers believed that this paper was an important contribution to our knowledge about the mechanisms by which resveratrol and other chemicals may play a role in cardiovascular and other diseases.  Such knowledge could help develop approaches for the prevention and treatment of human disease and for increasing the longevity of a healthy life.

Reference:  Park S-J, Ahmad F, Philp A, Baar K, Williams T, Luo H, Ke H, Rehmann H, Taussig R, Brown AL, Kim MK, Beaven MA, Burgin AB, Manganiello V, Chung JH.  Resveratrol ameliorates aging-related metabolic phenotypes by inhibiting cAMP phosphodiesterases.  Cell 2012;148:421-433.  DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2012.01.017.

Click here for the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research.

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Critique 069:  Little effect of binge drinking on heart disease or mortality among moderate drinkers in Denmark2 February 2012

In a well-done, population-based analysis from Denmark, it was found that subjects who were overall “light-to-moderate” drinkers but reported an episode of “binge drinking” (consumption >5 drinks on an occasion) did not show differences in risk of ischemic heart disease (coronary disease) or total mortality than did other moderate drinkers who did not report such an episode.  These results are somewhat different from results of many other epidemiologic studies that have shown increased risk of health problems (even higher risk of coronary disease) to be associated with what was referred to as “binge drinking.”

Why there were no adverse effects of such drinking in the present study has provoked considerable discussion among members of the Forum.  The general consensus of opinion has to do with inconsistencies in the definition of “binge drinking.”  The rapid consumption of more than 5 drinks on an empty stomach surely has different effects than the consumption of alcohol over several hours with food, such as during a prolonged dinner.  The rate of consumption strongly affects the consequences of alcohol; in fact, some have suggested that the consumption of more than 2 or 3 drinks in less than two hours may constitute a better definition of binge that the total number of drinks.

The Forum continues to suggest that “binge drinking,” however defined, is not a healthy pattern of alcohol consumption.  But the circumstances of consumption (rate of consumption, with or without food, etc.) may also be important in its definition and in judging its effects on health.

Reference:  Skov-Ettrup LS, Eliasen M, Ekholm O, Grønbaek M, Tolstrup JS.  Binge drinking, drinking frequency, and risk of ischaemic heart disease: A population-based cohort study.  Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 2011;39:880–887.

Click here for the full critique of this study by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research.

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Critique 068.  Heavier alcohol consumption may increase risk of colon cancer in people with a family history of such cancer  — 30 January 2012

An analysis based on a large number of subjects being followed in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, relates alcohol consumption to the risk of colon cancer according to whether or not the subjects had a positive family history of colon cancer.  Their results indicate that subjects with a family history whose average alcohol intake was 30 or more grams per day (about 2 ½ typical drinks by US standards) have an increase in their risk of colon cancer; there was not a significant association between alcohol and colon cancer among subjects without a positive family history.

Forum reviewers were somewhat concerned that the pattern of drinking (regularly or binge drinking) was not assessed, and that there was not a clear dose-response curve between the level of alcohol consumption and the risk of cancer (i.e., there was not a consistent increase in risk of cancer with greater alcohol intake).  Further, folate intake was found to modify the association, with the highest risk for subjects with a positive family history of colon cancer, low levels of folate, and in the highest category of alcohol consumption.

The present study provides some support for an association between higher levels of alcohol intake and the risk of colon cancer among subjects with a positive family history of such cancer.  However, there have been changes in the guidelines for screening for cancer (by endoscopy, with removal of pre-malignant tumors) and other preventive measures for people with a positive family history of colon cancer.  Such measures could modify the effects of all risk factors for colon cancer in future analyses.

Reference:  Cho E, Lee JE, Rimm EB, Fuchs CS, Giovannucci EL.  Alcohol consumption and the risk of colon cancer by family history of colorectal cancer.  Am J Clin Nutr 2012;95:413–419.

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Critique 067:  Comparison of effects of red wine versus white wine on hormones related to breast cancer risk 19 January 2012

Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) prevent the conversion of androgens to estrogens, and could play a role in the development of breast cancer.  This study of 36 pre-menopausal women consisted of a cross-over intervention trial to determine if there were differences between red wine and white wine in their effects on AIs.  Subjects sequentially consumed eight ounces of red wine, followed by white wine (or vice versa), each beverage for a one-month period.  The investigators concluded that red wine, but not white wine, was associated with significant effects on some indices of estrogen metabolism; free testosterone and luteinizing hormone were increased, but no significant differences were noted in estrogen levels.

Forum reviewers considered the results interesting and that they contribute to our understanding of the relation of wine to hormonal levels.  On the other hand, they were concerned about methodological problems, including a lack of baseline data and variations in the timing during the menstrual period of blood sampling (which could affect estrogen levels).  Also, no significant effect of the interventions was seen on blood levels of estradiol.

Further, the Forum thought that it should be pointed out that data are inconsistent on the relation of red wine consumption to the risk of breast cancer; many studies do not show beverage-specific effects on risk.  More research will be needed to determine if the polyphenols in red wine can play a role in lowering the risk of breast cancer.

Reference:  Shufelt C, Bairey Merz CN, Yang YC, Kirschner J, Polk D, Stanczyk F, Paul-Labrador M, Braunstein GD.  Red versus white wine as a nutritional aromatase inhibitor in premenopausal women.  J Women’s Health, 2011;DOI: 10.1089/jwh.2011.3001

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Critique 066: Is it the alcohol or the polyphenols in red wine (or both) that decrease cardiovascular disease in wine drinkers?                                                                                                                                                16 January 2012

Human randomized intervention trials of wine and alcohol are not common.  This randomized, cross-over study was based on 67 male volunteers in Spain who were considered to be at “high-risk” of cardiovascular disease.  The subjects agreed to not consume any alcohol for a baseline period, then for three one-month periods consumed 30 g/day of alcohol as red wine or as gin, or an equivalent amount of phenolics from dealcoholized red wine.  The effects of each intervention on a large number of adhesion molecules and chemokines that affect inflammation and relate to the development of vascular disease were evaluated.

The key results of the study were that both ethanol and nonalcoholic compounds in red wine have potentially protective effects that may reduce the risk of vascular disease.  Specifically, the authors conclude that “the phenolic content of red wine may modulate leukocyte adhesion molecules, whereas both ethanol and polyphenols of red wine may modulate soluble inflammatory mediators in patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease.”  Thus, this study provides important new mechanistic evidence that the reduced risk of cardiovascular disease among red wine drinkers observed in most epidemiologic studies may result from a combination of both the alcohol and the polyphenols in the wine.

Reference:  Chiva-Blanch G, Urpi-Sarda M, Llorach R, Rotches-Ribalta M, Guillèn M, Casas R, Arranz S, Valderas-Martinez P, Portoles O, Corella D, Tinahones F, Lamuela-Raventos RM, Andres-Lacueva C, Estruch R.  Differential effects of polyphenols and alcohol of red wine on the expression of adhesion molecules and inflammatory cytokines related to atherosclerosis: a randomized clinical trial.  Am J Clin Nutr 2012. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.111.022889.

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Critique 065: Are there differences in mortality between people consuming wine and those consuming other types of alcoholic beverages?                                                                                                                                    20 December 2011

Wine consumers, especially in comparison with spirits drinkers, have been shown to have higher levels of education and income, to consume a healthier diet, be more physically active, and have other characteristics that are associated with better health outcomes.  However, epidemiologic studies have been inconsistent in showing that, after adjustment for all associated lifestyle factors, consumers of wine have lower risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality than do consumers of other beverages.

A study based on the long-term follow up of a group of older Americans concluded that the associated lifestyle habits and environmental factors of wine consumers largely explained their better health outcomes.  Forum reviewers were concerned about some of the methodological approaches used, and believed that the data presented in the paper were inadequate to support such a conclusion.  This was a small study, had only a single estimate of alcohol intake (at baseline but not throughout 20 years of follow up), and the authors may have over-adjusted for large differences in lifestyle factors between what they termed as “low-wine” and “high-wine” consumers.  The study did confirm a lower mortality risk for alcohol consumers than for non-drinkers.

Experimental studies have clearly indicated that the polyphenols and other constituents that are present in wine and some beers have independent protective effects against most cardiovascular risk factors.  Whether or not such advantages are seen among moderate drinkers of wine (or beer) in epidemiologic studies is difficult to determine, as comparisons are not being made between wine, beer, and spirits but between humans who consume one or other such beverage.  In almost all populations, drinkers of a specific beverage differ in many ways other than just the type of beverage they consume.

Reference:  Holahan CJ, Schutte KK, Brennan PL, North RJ, Holahah CK, Moos BS, Moos RH.  Wine consumption and 20-year mortality among late-life moderate drinkers.  J Stud Alcohol Drug 2012; 73: 80–88.

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Critique 064:  Association of lifestyle and environmental factors with the risk of cancer  — 13 December 2111

It has been well established that certain lifestyle habits relate to the risk of certain cancers (e.g., smoking and lung cancer).  In a well-done analysis, the authors estimate the proportion of cancer in the population associated with a variety of lifestyle and environmental factors.  They find that smoking has, by far, the largest effect on the risk of cancer, with 19.4% of cancer cases in the UK attributable to tobacco use.  A poor diet (less intake of fruits and vegetables and fiber and greater intake of meat and salt), obesity, and alcohol are the next most important factors that relate to cancer, with alcohol being calculated to relate to 4.0% of cancer cases in the UK.

Forum reviewers considered this to be a well-done paper that used epidemiologic methods that are preferable to those used in some previous such analyses.  Generally, they disagreed with the authors that no alcohol consumption was the theoretical “optimum exposure level,” as the risk of certain cancers seems to increase primarily from heavy drinking.  Further, they found reason to believe that the purported effects related to diet may have been over-estimated.

Nevertheless, this paper provides considerable new information on lifestyle and environmental factors that may relate to the risk of cancer.  It puts into perspective the importance of targeting certain behaviors for the potential reduction in the risk of cancer.

Reference:  Parkin DM, Boyd L, Walker LC.  The fraction of cancer attributable to lifestyle and environmental factors in the UK in 2010. Summary and conclusions.  British Journal of Cancer 2011;105:S77 – S81.

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Critique 063: Genes modify the risk of liver disease among alcoholics  — 5 December 2011

It has been widely observed that only a small percentage of alcoholics develop cirrhosis of the liver, the most advanced form of alcoholic liver disease (ALD); the reason why all alcoholics do not develop such disease is not known.  The present study from Spain, that includes original work and a meta-analysis, evaluates whether genetic polymorphisms that determine levels of glutathione-S-transferases (GST) relate to the risk of developing ALD among alcoholics.  Alcoholics with certain genetic GST polymorphisms were found to be at significant excess risk for such liver disease in comparison with alcoholics without these polymorphisms.

As stated by the authors, the theory that these enzymes may affect risk is based on the ability of certain GST alleles to detoxify harmful ethanol metabolites in the liver by conjugating acetaldehyde and ROS to reduced glutathione.  The specific polymorphisms that they found to be associated with increased liver disease are among those that would be expected to lower the activity of the corresponding GST enzymes; this would permit higher levels of toxic metabolites of alcohol and oxidative stress to be present for longer periods of time after excessive alcohol consumption.

Some Forum reviewers thought that while the study was well done, the authors were unclear as to how these data could directly lead to “potential therapeutic targets” for liver disease in alcoholics.  Nevertheless, the original study and meta-analysis provide important data on how specific genetic factors relate to the development of liver disease among alcoholics and could theoretically lead to better strategies for the prevention and treatment of alcoholic liver disease. 

Reference:  Marcos M, Pastor I, Chamorro A-J, Ciria-Abad S, González-Sarmiento R, Laso F-J.  Meta-analysis: glutathione-S-transferase allelic variants are associated with alcoholic liver disease.  Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2011;34:1159–1172.

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Critique 062:  Similar effects of beer and wine on the risk of cardiovascular disease and of total mortality  — 22 November 2011

The authors carried out an updated meta-analysis on the relationship between wine, beer or spirit consumption and cardiovascular outcomes, using state-of-the-art statistical techniques.  Their meta-analysis provides evidence of J-shaped relationships between both wine and beer intake and vascular risk, with maximal protection of about 33% at a level of 25 g/day of alcohol (approximately 2 drinks/day by US standards).  A statistically significant association between spirits intake and vascular disease was not found.

The key result of this meta-analysis is the finding of a very similar inverse association between the consumption of beer and the consumption of wine in relation to cardiovascular outcomes.  While a similar associationwas not seen for spirits consumption, the data presented do not permit the conclusion that the key effects on cardiovascular disease are primarily due to the polyphenols in beer and wine.  Similarly, the results do not permit the conclusion that the effect on cardiovascular disease is due primarily to the alcohol in these beverages.  The lack of a similar J-shaped association for spirits may have been due to different drinking patterns (e.g., more binge drinking among consumers of spirits), as the pattern of drinking was not included as a confounder in the analyses.

Reference: Costanzo S, Di Castelnuovo A, Donati MB, Iacoviello L, de Gaetano G.  Wine, beer or spirit drinking in relation to fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events: a meta-analysis.  Eur J Epidemiol 2011;DOI 10.1007/s10654-011-9631-0

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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A response from the Alcohol Policy Coalition of Australia to the Forum Critique #058: “A misguided statement on alcohol and health from a coalition in Australia,” which was published on the Forum web-site on 28 September 2011.

The Alcohol Policy Coalition of Australia has provided a response to Forum critique #058, “A misguided statement on alcohol and health from a coalition in Australia,” that was published on the Forum web-site on 28 September 2011.

The original Forum critique is available under Recent Reviews, #058 (click Critique o58).  A description of the Forum, its members, the goals of the Forum, a disclosure statement, etc., are available from the home page of the web-site.

The response from the Alcohol Policy Coalition is now published in full on our web-site, dated 18 November 2011. To read the response to our critique # 058 provided by the Alcohol Policy Coalition, please click here.

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Critique 061: The reduction in risk of coronary heart disease from alcohol consumption may involve mechanisms other than an increase in HDL-cholesterol. 10 November 2011

In a prospective, observational study of approximately 150,000 Norwegians, the investigators found that alcohol consumption was associated with a large decrease in the risk of death from coronary artery disease.  For men, the fully adjusted hazard ratio for cardiac death was 0.52 (95% CI 0.39 – 0.69) when comparing subjects reporting more than one drink/week in comparison with those reporting never or rarely drinking; for women, it was 0.62 (0.32–1.23).  There was little change in the hazard ratio when HDL-cholesterol (HDL) was added to the model, suggesting that very little of the lower risk of heart disease was due to an increase in HDL from alcohol consumption.

Forum members considered this a well-done analysis.  They were surprised at the very low amounts of alcohol intake reported by the subjects, with only 16% of males and about 8% of females reporting more than one drink/week.  It is possible that the low levels of drinking, or perhaps over-adjustment in the multivariable analysis, led to the lack of effect of HDL.  Most other studies have shown a much larger proportion of the effect of alcohol on heart disease risk to be associated with an increase in HDL.

Reference:  Magnus P,  Bakke E,  Hoff DA,  Høiseth G,  Graff-Iversen S,  Knudsen GP,  Myhre R,  Normann PT,  Næss Ø,  Tambs K,  Thelle DS, Mørland J.  Controlling for High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Does Not Affect the Magnitude of the Relationship Between Alcohol and Coronary Heart Disease.  Circulation 2011;124: DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.036491

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 060:   A new analysis from the Nurses’ Health Study on the association of alcohol with risk of breast cancer 3 November 2011

In a well-done analysis using prospectively collected data from the Nurses’ Health Study, the risk of breast cancer was found to be modestly increased among consumers of alcohol, even those whose total alcohol consumption was reported to be in the range of 3 to 6 drinks/week.  Similar small increases in the risk of breast cancer have been found from alcohol consumption in the majority of previous studies observational studies.  A strength of this study was the very large number of subjects, permitting the investigators to attempt to determine if both the amount of alcohol and the frequency of consumption were important in this association; strong effects were not found for either.  A weakness is the failure to report the effects of folate intake on the association between alcohol and cancer; the same investigators have previously shown that folate is a potential moderator of the effects of alcohol on breast cancer risk.

The authors describe well the dilemma that women face regarding alcohol intake, which may increase slightly the risk of breast cancer but markedly decrease the risk of other more common diseases, especially cardiovascular conditions.   For example, the authors state that regarding breast cancer, “We did find an increased risk at low levels of use, but the risk was quite small.”  Forum members agree with the statement of the authors that “An individual will need to weigh the modest risks of light to moderate alcohol use on breast cancer development against the beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease to make the best personal choice regarding alcohol consumption.”

Reference:  Chen WY, Rosner B, Hankinson SE, Colditz GA, Willett WC.  Moderate alcohol consumption during adult life, drinking patterns, and breast cancer risk.  JAMA 2011;306:1884-1890.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 059:   Association of quantity of alcohol and frequency of consumption with cancer mortality

20 October 2011

A paper from the National Institutes of Health in the United States attempts to evaluate the separate and combined effects of the frequency of alcohol consumption and the average quantity of alcohol per occasion as they relate to the risk of mortality from all cancers, as well as cancer-specific mortality.  It is based on repeated administrations of the National Health Interview Survey in the United States, with a total of more than 300,000 subjects and over 8,000 deaths from cancer, and reports on total cancer deaths and deaths from lung, colorectal, prostate, and breast cancers.

For total alcohol consumption (frequency x quantity), the data indicate a significant reduction in the risk of all-site cancers (RR=0.87, CI 0.80-0.94) which, interestingly, is not emphasized by the authors and is not included in their abstract.  Moderate drinking consistently shows no effect, and only heavier drinking is associated with an increase in all-site cancer risk.  For site-specific cancers, an increase in risk of lung cancer was seen only for heavier drinkers, with a tendency for less cancer among light drinkers.  There was no evidence of an effect of total alcohol consumption on colorectal, prostate, or breast cancer.

The authors excluded non-drinkers in a second analysis in which they used categories of usual daily quantity and of frequency of consumption in an attempt to investigate their separate effects.  For all-site cancer and for lung cancer, these results again show an increase in risk only for drinkers reporting greater amounts of alcohol.  The data also show an increase in cancer risk from more frequent drinking among women but not among men.  For colorectal, prostate, and breast cancer, there is no clear pattern of an increase in risk from quantity of alcohol consumed.  For frequency of drinking, again there is a suggestion of an increase in risk with more frequent drinking, although the trends are not statistically significant.

The overall message of this analysis is that light to moderate alcohol intake does not appear to increase the risk of all-site cancer (and light drinking was shown in this study to be associated with a significant decrease in risk).  Similarly, light to moderate consumption was not associated with site-specific cancers of the lung, colorectum, breast, or prostate.  Heavier drinking is known to be associated with a large number of adverse health effects, including certain cancers, as was shown in this study.

When considering cancer, alcohol consumption should not be considered in isolation, but in conjunction with, other lifestyle behaviors (especially smoking).  We agree with the authors that both quantity and frequency of consumption need to be considered when evaluating the relation of alcohol to cancer; further, beverage-specific effects need to be further evaluated.

Reference:  Rosalind A. Breslow RA, Chen CM, Graubard BI, Mukamal KJ.   Prospective study of alcohol consumption quantity and frequency and cancer-specific mortality in the US population.  Am J Epidemiol 2011; DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwr210.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 058:   A misguided statement on alcohol and health from a coalition in Australia. 28 September 2011

A group known as the Alcohol Policy Coalition in Australia has released a document entitled Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease and Alcohol Consumption.  Forum members agree that excessive alcohol use has many adverse effects on the individual and on society, and efforts to reduce such use are important.  On the other hand, they were disturbed that the coalition statement was limited almost exclusively to the effects of abusive drinking, was based primarily on extremely limited sources of information (mainly position statements by other organizations, and not publications based on sound research), and indicated a strong bias against alcohol.

Forum members contend that the Australian report misrepresents the extensive scientific data available on alcohol and health.  The report specifically ignores scientific data indicating that in all developed countries, moderate consumers of alcohol are at much lower risk of essentially all of the diseases of ageing: coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, diabetes, and dementia.  And conspicuously absent from the Australian report is a description of the lower total mortality among middle-aged and elderly people associated with moderate alcohol consumption, a finding that has been found consistently throughout the world.  Further, there is no mention in the report of the key relevance of the pattern of drinking, although regular moderate drinking (versus binge drinking only on week-ends, even when the total volume of alcohol is the same) has been shown to be a strong determinant of beneficial effects of alcohol consumption.

Scientific data over many decades have shown that while excessive or irresponsible alcohol use has severe adverse health and societal effects, regular moderate drinking is associated with beneficial effects on health.  And a very large number of experimental studies, including results from human trials, have described biological mechanisms for the protective effects of both alcohol and the polyphenolic components of wine.

There have been a number of comprehensive meta-analyses published that Forum members believe can provide much more accurate, up to date, and scientifically balanced views of the current status of the health effects of alcohol consumption.  Such documents are better sources of data upon which policy decisions should be based.

Reference:  Alcohol Policy Coalition Position Statement.  “Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease and Alcohol Consumption.”  Released in Australia, September 2011.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click  here.

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Critique 057:      Differences in effects on atherosclerosis of regular moderate drinking and binge drinking.   An experimental study in mice.                                                                                                              20 September 2011

An excellent study among experimental animals has reported very dramatic differences between the effects of alcohol administered in moderation on a daily basis and the same total weekly amount of alcohol administered on only two days of the week: binge drinking.  The mice used in the study that were given regular moderate amounts of alcohol showed no weight gain, improved lipid values, and much less development of atherosclerosis than did control animals.  However, those given alcohol in a binge-drinking pattern showed worse outcomes than control animals, and much worse outcomes than those given regular moderate alcohol.

This experimental study provides strong support for the frequent finding among humans in epidemiologic studies: benefits from regular moderate drinking, adverse effects from binge drinking.  It is especially important since, being an experimental study, the potential confounding effects of other lifestyle habits are not an issue, as is always the case for observational studies among humans.

Reference:  Liu W, Redmond EM, Morrow D, Cullen JP.  Differential effects of daily-moderate versus weekend-binge alcohol consumption on atherosclerotic plaque development in mice.  Atherosclerosis 2010, doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2011.08.034

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 056:  Relation of alcohol consumption to colorectal cancer 13 September 2011

A meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies on the association of alcohol consumption with colorectal cancer was carried out, based on 22 studies from Asia, 2 from Australia, 13 from Western Europe, and 24 from North America.  The paper provides evidence that alcohol, at least at higher levels of consumption, is associated with an increase in the risk of colorectal cancer.  Overall, there was no increase in the risk for consumers reporting an average intake of up to 1 drink per day, but a modest increase (of 21%) for what the authors defined as “moderate drinking” (averaging up to 49.9 g of alcohol, or about 4 typical drinks, per day).  The increase in risk was greater (52%) for consumers of 50 or more grams of alcohol per day.

Forum reviewers thought that this was, in general, a very well-done study that used appropriate statistical techniques for meta-analysis.  There were some key concerns, however, including the following: (1) the authors’ definition of “moderate drinking” extended well above the usual recommended limits for sensible drinking; effects of consumption in categories of 1 to 2 drinks/day, 2 to 3 drinks/day, etc., were not given; (2) no results were provided according to type of beverage even though many previous studies have shown differences between health effects for consumers of wine, or wine/beer, and other beverages; and (3) no data were available on the pattern of drinking.  Many studies have shown that regular, moderate drinking on most days of the week has very different health outcomes than drinking only on week-ends or binge drinking.

Despite these concerns, Forum members agreed that current data indicate that alcohol intake, especially heavier drinking, is associated with an increase in the risk of colorectal cancers.  Future studies are needed to help determine if there is a threshold level of alcohol that increases the risk, if there are differences by type of beverage, and if the pattern of drinking (regular versus binge drinking) affects the risk.

Reference:  FedirkoV, Tramacere I, Bagnardi V, Rota M, Scotti L, Islami F, et al.  Alcohol drinking and colorectal cancer risk: an overall and dose–response meta-analysis of published studies.  Annals of Oncology 22: 1958–1972, 2011, doi:10.1093/annonc/mdq653

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 055. Alcohol intake and “successful ageing” 8 September 2111

Among 13,894 women in the Nurses’ Health Study, investigators prospectively examined alcohol use assessed at midlife in relation to “successful ageing,” which was defined as survival to age 70 years, not having a major chronic disease (such as coronary disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes), and having no major cognitive impairment, physical impairment, or mental health problems.  Only 11% of the women met these criteria.

The results indicate that moderate drinkers, especially those consuming wine and drinking regularly, were more likely to exhibit successful ageing.  For average amount consumed, the largest benefit (an increase of 28%) was among women who reported 15.1 – 30 g of alcohol per day (an average of just over 1 to 2 ½ drinks per day), when compared with non-drinkers.  The frequency of drinking was especially important: in comparison with nondrinkers, women who drank only on 1 to 2 days per week had little increase in their risk of successful ageing, but those drinking on at least 5 days per week had almost a 50% greater chance of successful ageing.

Forum reviewers had some questions about the definition of “successful ageing” used in this study.  It is believed that a much greater percentage of people who may not meet these criteria make huge contributions to society and should be considered “successful.”

In summary, these results support the findings of earlier studies showing that many aspects of successful ageing, in addition to just survival, are favorably affected by regular, moderate consumption of alcohol.

Reference:  Sun Q, Townsend MK, Okereke OI, Rimm EB, Hu FB, Stampfer MJ, Grodstein F.  Alcohol consumption at midlife and successful ageing in women: A prospective cohort analysis in the Nurses’ Health Study.  PLoS Med 8(9): e1001090. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001090

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 054.  Role of alcohol intake and smoking on upper aerodigestive cancers       -         6 September 2011

This paper provies an extensive analysis of the proportion of the risk of upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers in the population (the population attributable risk) may be due to alcohol consumption and/or smoking.  The analyses provide strong evidence that smoking is the most important factor in the risk of these cancers, and the risk is enhanced among those who also consume 2 or more drinks per day.  Alcohol alone (i.e., among non-smokers) has little effect on the risk.

The authors state that their observations “are consistent with the hypothesis that alcohol acts as a carcinogen primarily because of its promoting effect on tobacco smoke.”  In terms of the population-attributable risk, the authors conclude that “Our findings confirm that tobacco and alcohol together explain 73% of total UADT cancer burden in Europe.”  Overall, tobacco use alone explained 28.7%, the combination of smoking and drinking 43.9%, and alcohol use alone only 0.4% of the population attributable risk.  Among women, the risk of these cancers was higher among smokers than among those who both smoked and consumed alcohol; this perhaps suggests that the moderate intake of wine, the most common beverage among European women, may play a role in reducing the risk associated with smoking.

Forum reviewers thought that this was a very good paper, but hoped that in the future we would have more studies that evaluated the effects on risk of varying levels of alcohol consumption, differential effects of various beverages, and even differential effects according to subjects’ genetically determined differences in alcohol metabolizing enzymes.

Reference:  Anantharaman D, Marron M, Lagiou P, Samoli E, Ahrens W, Pohlabeln H, et al. Population attributable risk of tobacco and alcohol for upper aerodigestive tract cancer.  Oral Oncology 2011;47:725–731.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 053:  An extensive review of the effects of alcohol consumption on the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia                                                                                                                                               25 August 2011

The authors of this paper have carried out an excellent review of the relation of alcohol consumption to the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia.  They reviewed a total of 143 previous publications on the topic. There were 74 studies, based on a total of more than 250,000 subjects, that provided risk estimates for varying levels of alcohol consumption which allowed the investigators to include them in a comprehensive meta-analysis.  These papers were published mainly after 1998, were predominantly among older subjects (92% were ≥ 55 years of age and 70% ≥ 65 years of age), and almost all employed mental status examinations to define cognitive impairment/dementia.

As stated by the authors, “These studies overwhelmingly found that moderate drinking either reduced or had no effect on the risk of dementia or cognitive impairment.”  Overall, in the new meta-analysis based on these studies, the average ratio of risk for cognitive risk associated with moderate drinking of alcohol was 0.77, with nondrinkers as the reference group.  This estimate is close to the estimates of reduction in the risk of cognitive dysfunction (RR of 0.73 and 0.74) seen in other recent selective meta-analyses.  The present study found that both light and moderate drinking provided a similar benefit, but heavy drinking was associated with non-significantly higher cognitive risk for dementia and cognitive impairment.

Forum reviewers of this paper were particularly pleased that the authors attempted to answer a number of specific questions on this topic that have been raised from previous research.  Their results included finding no appreciable differences whether or not “sick quitters” were included in the reference group, little effect from adjustments for other lifestyle factors, and no significant differences between alcohol’s effects on dementia, Alzheimer’s dementia, or vascular dementia (but, based on a small number of studies, no significant reduction in risk of cognitive decline over time).  The investigators concluded that there were no differences between results in men and women.  Their analyses also led to the conclusion that wine is associated with more beneficial effects on cognition than beer or spirits, but the authors caution that these results are based on a limited number of reports, and that many studies show no significant differences according to type of beverage.

Forum reviewers agreed with the conclusions of the authors that “Overall, light to moderate drinking does not appear to impair cognition in younger subjects and actually seems to reduce the risk of dementia and cognitive decline in older subjects.”

Reference:  Neafsey EJ, Collins MA.  Moderate alcohol consumption and cognitive risk.  Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 2011:7:465–484.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 052:  Does moderate alcohol consumption increase body weight? 16 August 2011

A paper from Spain provides an extensive review of the association between alcohol consumption and body weight.  It includes descriptions of cross-sectional and prospective studies (and a few small intervention studies) among subjects who varied in age (adolescence to old age), culture (from Americans and Europeans to Asians), and principal type of beverage consumed and pattern of drinking.  The authors state that many of the studies they reviewed appear to be contradictory in their results.  However, based on their review, they conclude that “as positive associations between alcohol and weight gain were mainly found in studies with data on higher levels of drinking, it is possible that an effect on weight gain or abdominal adiposity may only be experienced by heavy drinkers.”  A second conclusion of the authors is that “the type of alcoholic beverage might play an important role in modifying the effect of alcohol consumption on weight gain,” with more favorable effects generally seen among consumers of wine.  A formal meta-analysis is not provided.  Forum members were uncertain whether the higher risk seen for spirits drinkers in this study was due to the beverage they chose or to their consumption of larger amounts of alcohol.

The overall conclusions of the authors is that it is currently unclear whether alcohol consumption a risk factor for weight gain, but if so it appears to occur mainly among heavier drinkers.  They also state that “light-to-moderate alcohol intake, especially of wine, may be more likely to protect against, rather than promote, weight gain.”

Forum reviewers agreed with most of the conclusions of the authors, especially that current data do not clearly indicate if moderate drinking increases weight; further, the biologic mechanisms relating alcohol to changes in body weight are not well understood.  The Forum review comments on the strong protective effects of moderate drinking on the risk of metabolic syndrome and diabetes, both of which relate to increasing obesity.  And some studies suggest that even very obese people may be at lower risk of diabetes if they are moderate drinkers.  Forum members also reviewed some of the distinctive mechanisms by which alcohol is metabolized in the body (it provides calories that are rapidly absorbed and are not stored in fat) that could explain differences in the effects of calories from alcohol and from other foods.

Forum members agree with the authors of this paper that future research efforts should be directed towards assessing the specific roles of different types of alcoholic beverages, taking into account drinking patterns, and perhaps including in the analysis the propensity of individual subjects to gain weight in the past.  For now, there is little evidence that someone consuming small to moderate amounts of alcohol on a regular basis is increasing his or her risk of becoming obese.

Reference:  Sayon-Orea C, Martinez-Gonzalez MA, Bes-Rastrollo M.  Alcohol consumption and body weight: a systematic review.  Nutrition Reviews 2011;69:419-431.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 051:  Types of alcohol in relation to acute pancreatitis                                                11 August 2011

A very well-done analysis from scientists in Sweden has related the type of alcoholic beverage, and the amount consumed per occasion, to the risk of acute pancreatitis.  The study suggests that a greater number of drinks per occasion (“binge drinking”) of spirits increases the risk of acute pancreatitis, but no such relation was seen for the consumption of beer or wine.  Forum reviewers suggested that a faster rate of drinking, with a greater rise in BAC, for spirits drinkers may be an important factor in the observed higher risk of pancreatitis; the increased risk may not necessarily be due to lower levels of antioxidants or to the presence of other toxic substances in spirits.

In any case, the average total alcohol consumption did not affect the risk of pancreatitis; instead, it was the number of drinks consumed per occasion (of spirits, in this study) that was associated with an increase in risk.  Residual confounding by the pattern of drinking, diet, or by other lifestyle factors could still be operating, and it will require replication of these results in other studies to support the conclusions of the authors.

Reference:  Azodi OS, Orsini N, Andrén-Sandberg Å, Wolk A.  Effect of type of alcoholic beverage in causing acute pancreatitis.  Brit J Surgery 2011;DOI: 10.1002/bjs.7632.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 050:  Multiple maternal risk factors for fetal alcohol disorders                                                 7 August 2011

An extremely well researched and written review on the relation of maternal drinking during pregnancy to adverse fetal outcomes has been published by scientists from the University of New Mexico Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions.  It covers many factors (host, agent exposure, and environment) that have been found to relate to the occurrence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD).  Such factors modify the risk associated with alcohol consumption during pregnancy, although the risk of abnormalities is clearly increased with frequent consumption of large amounts of alcohol, and is greater among women who are alcoholics.  While current data do not show that light or occasional alcohol consumption during pregnancy increases the risk of FASD, Forum members do not believe that pregnant women should be encouraged to drink.

Forum members agree with the authors that “More research is needed to more clearly define what type of individual behavioral, physical, and genetic factors are most likely to lead to having children with FASD.”  Evaluating these multidimensional factors should help identify women at particular risk for having a child with FASD and lead to interventions to prevent such fetal abnormalities.

Reference:  May PA, Gossage JP.  Maternal risk factors for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.  Not as simple as it might seem.  Alcohol Research & Health 2011;34:15-26.

For the full critique of this article by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 049:  Effects of smoking and alcohol use on risk of upper aero-digestive cancers 1 August 2011

A case-control analysis from subjects living in areas of South America with high rates of upper aero-digestive tract cancers showed that both alcohol consumption and smoking tended to increase the risk of such cancers.  However, the predominant cause of these cancers was the combination of smoking and alcohol consumption, with much higher risk than either exposure alone.  The effects on risk were greater for smoking than for alcohol: for non-smokers, there was little effect of alcohol on risk.  For non-drinkers, the risk of cancer associated with smoking was still increased, but was lower than it was for current drinkers.

An especially important finding in this study was that, among ex-drinkers and former smokers, the increased risks associated with alcohol and tobacco use decreased steadily as the time since quitting increased.  As stated by the authors, most of these cancers “could be prevented by quitting the use of either of these two agents.”

Reference:  Szymańska K, Hung RJ, Wűnsch-Filho V, Eluf-Neto J, Curado MP, Koifman S, Matos E, Menezes A, Fernandez L, Daudt AW, Boffetta P, Brennan P.   Alcohol and tobacco, and the risk of cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract in Latin America: a case–control study.  Cancer Causes Control (2011) 22:1037–1046.  DOI 10.1007/s10552-011-9779-7

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For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 048:  A new report on drinking guidelines and the association of alcohol with risk of cancer. 18 July 2011

The Canadian Medical Association Journal has published a commentary by some French scientists relating drinking guidelines to the association between alcohol and cancer.  They conclude that the current guidelines for sensible drinking for the general population are not adequate for the prevention of cancer, and revisions and eventual exclusion of such guidelines are needed.

Forum reviewers agree that alcohol consumption, especially heavy intake, increases the risk of certain types of cancer.  However, they consider that the opinions of the authors in the paper (labeled as an “Analysis” rather than an editorial or comments) do not reflect current sound scientific data, that the report is highly selective in citing a small number of papers that support their opinions, and that the authors have ignored a huge amount of recent data from more scientifically sound research that have largely discredited such studies.  Further, the report provides no mention of the consistent finding from studies around the world that moderate drinkers tend to have lower all-cause mortality risk than do abstainers.

Scientific data over many decades have shown that excessive or irresponsible alcohol use has severe adverse health effects, including an increase in the risk of certain cancers.  On the other hand, moderate drinking is associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease and many other diseases of ageing and with all-cause mortality.  A very large number of experimental studies, including results from human trials, have described biological mechanisms for the protective effects of alcoholic beverages against such diseases.  A number of comprehensive meta-analyses provide much more accurate, up to date, and scientifically balanced views than does the current paper; such documents may be better sources of data upon which guidelines to the public regarding alcohol consumption should be based.

Reference: Latino-Martel P, Arwidson P, Ancellin R, Druesne-Pecollo N, Hercberg S, Le Quellec-Nathan M, Le-Luong T, Maraninchi D. Alcohol consumption and cancer risk: revisiting guidelines for sensible drinking.  CMAJ 2011. DOI:10.1503. /cmaj.110363

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 047:  Overall health effects of alcohol consumption.  Comments on a WHO report                10 July 2011

The World Health Organization (WHO) has released its global status report on alcohol and health for 2011.  Forum members largely agreed with the discussion in the report of the serious health and societal problems associated with the misuse of alcohol, which contributes to accidents, many diseases, and premature deaths.  On the other hand, Forum members were disturbed that the report was limited almost exclusively to abusive drinking, was based primarily on out-dated information, and minimized the beneficial health effects associated with moderate drinking.  The report ignored a massive amount of scientific data indicating that in all developed countries, moderate consumers of alcohol are at much lower risk of essentially all of the diseases of ageing: coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, diabetes, dementia, and osteoporosis.  And conspicuously absent from the WHO report is a description of the decrease in total mortality among middle-aged and elderly people associated with moderate alcohol consumption, a finding that has been found consistently throughout the world.

Epidemiologic studies over many decades have shown that while excessive or irresponsible alcohol use has severe adverse health and societal effects, moderate drinking is associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease and other diseases of ageing.  And a very large number of experimental studies, including results from human trials, have described biological mechanisms for the protective effects of both alcohol and the polyphenolic components of wine.  A number of comprehensive meta-analyses are cited by Forum reviewers which they consider to provide much more accurate, up to date, and scientifically balanced views of the current “status” of the health effects of alcohol consumption.  Such documents are better sources of data upon which policy decisions should be based.

Reference:  Global status report on alcohol and health.  World Health Organization 2011.  ISBN 978 92 4 156415 1 (NLM classification: WM 274)

For the full critique of this publication by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 046: All-cause mortality rates are lower among moderate drinkers than among abstainers.  4 July 2011

The author of this paper set out to determine the extent to which potential “errors” in many early epidemiologic studies led to erroneous conclusions about an inverse association between moderate drinking and coronary heart disease (CHD).  His analysis is based on prospective data for more than 124,000 persons interviewed in the U.S. National Health Interview Surveys of 1997 through 2000 and avoids the pitfalls of some earlier studies.  He concludes that the so-called “errors” have not led to erroneous results, and that there is a strong protective effect of moderate drinking on CHD and all-cause mortality.

The results of this analysis support the vast majority of recent well-done prospective studies.  In the present paper, non-drinkers had much higher risk of death than did almost all categories of subjects consuming alcohol.  The author contends that these results lend credence to the argument that the relationship between alcohol and mortality is causal.

While some Forum reviewers felt that this analysis only replicates what has been shown in many other papers, it appears that erroneous information continues to be used by some policy groups.  Thus, most reviewers believe that this new analysis provides important information on potential health effects of moderate drinking.

Reference:  Fuller TD.  Moderate alcohol consumption and the risk of mortality.  Demography 2011.  DOI 10.1007/s13524-011-0035-2

For the full review of this publication by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 045:  Alcohol drinking in the elderly: Risks and benefits.  26 June 2011

The Royal College of Psychiatrists of London has published a report related primarily to problems of unrecognized alcohol misuse among the elderly.  The report provides guidelines for psychiatrists and family physicians on how to find and how to treat elderly people with misuse of alcohol and drugs.  The report also mentions lower “sensible limits” for older people in comparison with younger people.  The Forum reviewers point out, however, inherent difficulties in providing guidelines for a very non-homogenous group of individuals whose only criterion for inclusion is being above the age of 65 years.  Such a group includes individuals varying from marathon runners to very sick, frail people.  Forum reviewers thought that advice to lower limits of drinking for everyone in this age group is not based on reliable research, and would certainly not apply to all in this age group.

The Forum reviewers were also struck by the absence in the Royal College report of any discussion of the strong positive effects of moderate drinking on most of the diseases of ageing, especially cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and dementia, which are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in this age group.  For healthy moderate and responsible drinkers, advice to reduce or stop all alcoholic beverage intake would not be in the best health interests of such individuals.

Reference:  Royal College of Psychiatrists, London.  Our invisible addicts.  First Report of the Older Persons’ Substance Misuse Working Group of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, College Report CR165.  June 2011

For the full review of this publication by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 044:  The association of alcohol drinking with migraine headache 12 June 2011

An excellent paper from a headache center in Italy summarizes the scientific data relating alcohol ingestion to migraine headaches.  The factors that trigger an attack of migraine, or of other headaches as well, are poorly understood.  While retrospective studies tend to include alcohol as a trigger for an attack, the authors describe that in a recent prospective study (in which information on the factors that could potentially trigger an attack were collected prior to the migraine attack), menstruation, stress, and fatigue were found most commonly to relate to a subsequent attack, but not alcohol consumption (in fact, beer consumption on the previous day reduced the risk of a migraine attack).  In the present paper, the authors reviewed the role and mechanism of action of alcohol or other components of alcoholic drinks in relation to alcohol-induced headache.  They conclude from their review that reports overestimate the role of alcohol, as well as other foods, in the triggering of migraine.

Forum members thought that this was a very balanced review of the subject, and that it provided straightforward and sensible advice.  Although some individuals surely have the onset of a migraine or other type of headache after the consumption of wine or alcohol, the findings are not consistent.  Forum members suggest that given that subjects reporting migraine headaches have been found to be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it would not be appropriate to advise all such sufferers to avoid alcohol.  As suggested by the authors of this paper, it may be reasonable for those subjects who had a desire to consume alcohol to drink small amounts of specific beverages to see if each beverage was tolerated or not.  After seeing the effects, and factoring in symptoms versus potential benefits from moderate drinking, a reasonable discussion can be carried out with respect to continued alcohol use by subjects with migraine.

Reference:  Panconesi A, Bartolozzi ML, Guidi L.  Alcohol and migraine: What should we tell patients?  Curr Pain Headache Rep 2011;15:177–184.  DOI 10.1007/s11916-011-0184-4.

For the full critique of this paper by members of  the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 043:  Frequent moderate drinking of alcohol is associated with a lower risk of fatty liver disease.                                                                                                                                                                                23 May 2011

In a large study of men in Japan, the presence of fatty liver disease by ultrasonography showed an inverse association with the frequency of alcohol consumption; there was some suggestion of an increase in fatty liver disease with higher volume of alcohol consumed per day.  Moderate drinkers had lower levels of obesity than did non-drinkers, and both obesity and metabolic abnormalities were positively associated with fatty liver disease.

These findings support the results of a number of other recent studies showing that moderate drinking does not increase the risk of this common type of liver disease; instead, it is associated with a lower risk of its occurrence.  We agree with the implications of these studies as stated by the authors: “These results suggest that lifestyle modifications aimed at fighting central obesity and metabolic abnormalities should be the most important recommendations for the management of fatty liver.  In addition, it seems unlikely that the risk of fatty liver can be reduced by the discontinuation and/or reduction of alcohol consumption alone.”

Reference:  Hiramine Y, Imamura Y, Uto H, Koriyama C, Horiuchi M, Oketani M, Hosoyamada K, Kusano K, Ido A, Tsubouchi H.  Alcohol drinking patterns and the risk of fatty liver in Japanese men.  J Gastroenterol 2011 46:519–528.  DOI 10.1007/s00535-010-0336-z.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 042:  An increase in risk of certain types of gastric cancer from heavy drinking, but no increase from moderate alcohol consumption 17 May 2011

A very well-done meta-analysis supports other data generated on the risk of alcohol consumption and gastric cancer – that is – that the risk may be real for heavy alcohol consumption but not for moderate intake.  The type of gastric cancer relating to heavier alcohol intake in this study tended to be tumors involving the noncardia, but differences between the association with tumors of the gastric cardia were not significant.

There was no increased risk of gastric cancer from alcohol among Asians; this may be due to lower alcohol intake; there is a greater prevalence among Asians of the inactive ALDH2 genotype that is associated with flushing and other adverse effects of alcohol, and such subjects tend to drink less alcohol.  However, a number of studies have shown higher risk for upper aero-digestive cancers for subjects with this ALDH2 genotype, so the overall reason for the lower risk among Asians in this study remains unclear.  The main outcome of the study is that there is no increase in the risk of gastric cancer associated with the moderate intake of alcohol.

Reference:  Tramacere I, Negri E, Pelucchi C, Bagnardi V, Rota M, Scotti L, Islami F, Corrao G, La Vecchia C, Boffetta P.  A meta-analysis on alcohol drinking and gastric cancer risk.  Ann Oncology 2011;doi:10.1093/annonc/mdr135

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 041:  Estimated health effects of changes in advice for alcohol consumption between the 2005 and 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans 6 May 2011

This paper from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in the US suggests that the changes in wording of the alcohol recommendations in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans between 2005 and 2010 indicate that some at-risk drinkers could be classified as moderate drinkers.  The authors carried out an analysis using data from a large, nationally representative sample of U.S. adults to estimate differences between subjects following the 2005 recommendations and a “gray zone” of subjects who exceed the 2005 recommendations but fall within the moderate guidelines according to the 2010 recommendations.  The differences between these two groups were minimal; other than the gray zone subjects having an increased risk of alcohol dependence (which is unlikely to relate to their slight differences in consumption), the only other differences between the two groups related to alcohol-related interpersonal relations and job loss.  And, as the authors state, “There were no associations with medical conditions or mental disorders.”

More importantly, the authors state that “Moreover, of the gray area drinkers who experienced incident alcohol dependence and interpersonal problems, 89% of the former and 94% of the latter had moved out of the gray area and into the highest-risk consumption group over the course of the follow-up interval.”  Problems were thus very rare in those who remained in the gray zone of drinking during follow up.

Obviously, drinking 3 or 4 drinks/day (other than doing so only occasionally) should not be considered a healthy way to consume alcohol.  But if, as the authors state, almost all of the estimated effects on health are due to subjects who increase their drinking above this “gray zone,” there is little support for their argument that the changes in guidelines make a difference.

Reference:  Dawson DA, Grant BF.  The “Gray Area” of consumption between moderate and risk drinking.  J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2011;72:453–458.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 040:  Lower risk of coronary heart disease from alcohol, even with heavy drinking 27 April 2011

Using data from The 2001–2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions study (the NESARC study, n = 43,093), the authors of this paper conclude that alcohol may have cardioprotective effects not only in moderate drinkers, but also in individuals with patterns of use traditionally considered as “hazardous.”  While such a finding has been shown in some population studies, there were questions by Forum reviewers as to the adequacy of the method for diagnosing coronary artery disease: self-report, with most subjects listing angina pectoris, a “soft” criterion for coronary disease.

In addition, the categories of drinking used in this study were very broad: rare or only occasional drinkers were combined with regular drinkers up to 7 or 14 drinks per week in the “moderate” category; the “hazardous” category included a broad range of drinkers, from a minimal increase over the recommended limits to very heavy drinkers.  The pattern of drinking (especially the number of days per week that alcohol was consumed) was not reported, making it difficult to separate regular from heavy week-end drinkers.  The effects of heavier drinking on other conditions (such as alcohol-related liver disease, mortality, etc.) were not included in this analysis.

It is physiologically possible that even hazardous use of alcohol, like moderate use, may well lead to cleaner arteries and therefore lower rates of coronary artery disease.  If this is the case, an explanation for the increases in cardiovascular mortality reported for heavy drinkers in many studies may relate not directly to coronary artery disease, but to conditions such as cardiomyopathy or cardiac arrhythmias.  However, the rates of accidents, suicide and other morbidity associated with hazardous alcohol use may well overcome any protective effects on coronary disease.

Reference:  Le Strat Y, Gorwood P.  Hazardous drinking is associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease: Results from a national representative sample.  Am J Addict 2011;20:257–263.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 039:  The role that alcohol drinking may play in the risk of cancer 17 April 2011

A large group of distinguished scientists have published a very detailed and rather complex paper describing the association between alcohol consumption and cancer.  It is based on data from the EPIC study in Europe, with a mean follow up of 8.8 years for more than 300,000 subjects.  The authors describe an increase in risk of many cancers from alcohol intake, but do not give data permitting the detection of a threshold of intake for an adverse effect on cancer risk.  The investigators conclude that “In western Europe, an important proportion of cases of cancer can be attributable to alcohol consumption, especially consumption higher than the recommended upper limits.”

Members of the Forum were concerned that the authors did not separate moderate consumption from heavy consumption for their main analyses, ignored the demonstrated benefits of moderate drinking on total mortality, and did not point out other environmental influences (such as smoking, diet, obesity, etc.) that often have much larger effects on the risk of many cancers than does alcohol consumption.  The authors make statements such as alcohol has negative effects on total mortality that are not supported by the data presented in their paper, and are contradicted by most large-scale population-based studies.  Overall, while this paper supports the well-known association between heavy drinking and an increased risk of upper aero-digestive and certain other cancers, it adds little information useful for the prevention of most types of cancer.

Reference:  Schűtze M, Boeing H, Pischon T, et al, Alcohol attributable burden of incidence of cancer in eight European countries based on results from prospective cohort study.  BMJ 2011; 342:d1584 doi: 10.1136/bmj.d1584 (Published 7 April 2011)

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click  here.

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Critique 038:  Effects of a large reduction in alcohol prices on mortality in Finland 7 April 2011

Time series intervention analysis modeling was applied to the monthly aggregations of deaths in Finland for the period 1996–2006 to assess the impact of a reduction in alcohol prices in 2004.  The authors report that alcohol-related deaths increased in men aged 40–49 years, and in men and women aged 50–69 years: the mean rate of alcohol-related mortality increased by 17%, 14%, and 40%, respectively, which implies 2.5, 2.9 and 1.6 additional monthly deaths per 100,000 person-years following the price reduction.  In contrast to alcohol-related mortality, CVD and all-cause mortality decreased among men and women in the highest age category.  The changes were consistent with 19 and 25 fewer monthly deaths per 100,000 person-years for CVD and 42 and 69 fewer monthly deaths for all-cause mortality.

Forum members agreed that both potentially harmful and beneficial effects resulting from changes in alcohol intake should be considered when estimating population effects.  They were unsure whether all of the reported effects in the elderly should be attributed to changes in alcohol intake, as decreases in CVD and all-cause mortality rates were occurring prior to the change in alcohol intake.

Reference:  Herttua K, Mäkelä P, Martikainen P.  An evaluation of the impact of a large reduction in alcohol prices on alcohol-related and all-cause mortality: time series analysis of a population-based natural experiment.  Int J Epidemiol 2011;40:441-454; doi:10.1093/ije/dyp336.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 037:  Genes found to relate to level of alcohol consumption among Asians                    27 March 2011

In a study of 1,721 Korean male drinkers aged 40–69 y in an urban population–based cohort, and another sample of 1,113 male drinkers from an independent rural cohort, information on average daily alcohol consumption was collected and DNA samples were collected for genotyping.  In a genome-wide association (GWA) study, 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 12q24 had genome-wide significant associations with alcohol consumption.  These polymorphisms were closely related to genes that determine levels of ALDH, low levels of which relate to flushing after even small amounts of alcohol.  Such enzymes are much more common among Asians than among westerners.  Further, associations were tested only with the weekly amount of alcohol consumed, not the pattern of drinking; hence, these findings are not direct measures of alcoholism.

The editorial by Freedman et al states “epidemiologic literature suggests that those who begin drinking at an early age may be at greater risk for a maladaptive and more genetically pronounced form of alcohol consumption, and other environmental milieus affect the risk of alcoholism.”   It will be important to investigate the interplay of genes and environmental factors when seeking the determinants of alcohol abuse.  Despite the findings of this study, our understanding of factors associated with alcoholism remains very limited.

Reference:  Baik I, Cho NH, Kim SH, Han B-G, Shin C.  Genome-wide association studies identify genetic loci related to alcohol consumption in Korean men.  Am J Clin Nutr 2011;93:809–816.

Accompanying Editorial:  Agrawal A, Freedman ND, Bierut LJ.  Genome-wide association studies of alcohol intake—a promising cocktail?  Am J Clin Nutr 2011;93:681–683.

For the full critique of this article by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 036:  Alcohol consumption after age 75 associated with lower risk of developing dementia

7 March 2011

A population-based study of elderly Germans, aged 75 and older, evaluated the association between alcohol consumption and incident overall dementia and Alzheimer dementia over 3 years.  There was good ascertainment of the development of dementia, even among subjects who died during follow up.

Of 3,202 subjects free of dementia at baseline, 217 subjects met criteria of dementia during follow up.  Subjects consuming alcohol had approximately 30% less overall dementia and 40% less Alzheimer dementia than did non-drinking subjects.  Unlike many previous studies showing greater effects of wine on reducing risk of dementia, no significant differences were seen according to the type of alcoholic beverage consumed.  Overall, these results are similar to several previous studies in the very elderly and suggest that moderate drinking is associated with less dementia, even among individuals aged 75 years and older.

Reference:  Weyerer S, Schaufele M, Wiese B, Maier W, Tebarth F, van den Bussche H, Pentzek M, Bickel H, Luppa M, Riedel-Heller SG, for the German AgeCoDe Study Group (German Study on Ageing, Cognition and Dementia in Primary Care Patients).   Current alcohol consumption and its relationship to incident dementia: results from a 3-year follow-up study among primary care attenders aged 75 years and older.  Age and Ageing 2011; 0: 1–7; doi: 10.1093/ageing/afr007.

For the full critique of this article by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 035:  A review of the association of alcohol consumption with cardiovascular disease outcomes 5 March 2011

In an excellent summary, the authors of this paper have synthesized results from longitudinal cohort studies comparing alcohol drinkers with non-drinkers for the outcomes of overall mortality and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD), incident coronary heart disease (CHD), mortality from CHD, incident stroke, and mortality from stroke.  They conclude that light to moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of multiple cardiovascular outcomes.  Further, they suggest that current scientific data satisfy Hill criteria indicating causality, that alcohol intake is the cause of the lower risk of cardiovascular disease among moderate drinkers.

Forum members thought that this was a very well-done, comprehensive summary of a large number of studies on alcohol and cardiovascular disease.  Some believed that two topics were not adequately discussed: (1) greater benefits from wine than from other beverages, a result seen in many studies, and (2) the importance of the pattern of drinking on the health effects of alcohol.  However, Forum members welcomed the discussion in the paper as to causality and regarding future directions in research, with more emphasis into how physicians and individual patients might respond to encouragement to consume alcohol for its potentially beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease.  Most believe that there is no substitute for balanced judgment by a knowledgeable, objective health professional when discussing alcohol intake, and this requires is a synthesis of common sense and the best available scientific facts as they apply to the individual.

Reference:  Ronksley PE, Brien SE, Turner BJ, Mukamal KJ, Ghali WA.  Association of alcohol consumption with selected cardiovascular disease outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  BMJ 2011;342:d671; doi:10.1136/bmj.d671

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 034:  A review of interventional studies in humans showing effects of alcohol on risk factors for cardiovascular disease 5 March 2011

A summary paper on the effects of alcohol consumption on biologic mechanisms associated with coronary heart disease provides an excellent review of a large number of intervention studies in humans.  Appropriate analyses were done and the results are presented in a very clear fashion, although there was little discussion of the separate, independent effects of alcohol and polyphenols on risk factors.

The trials the authors reviewed have demonstrated that the moderate intake of alcoholic beverages leads to increases in HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1, and adiponectin and decreases in fibrinogen, all factors associated with a lower risk of heart disease.  The findings described in this paper strengthen the case for a causal link between alcohol intake and a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, suggesting that the lower risk of heart disease observed among moderate drinkers is caused by the alcoholic beverage itself, and not by other associated lifestyle factors.

Reference:  Brien SE, Ronksley PE,Turner BJ, Mukamal KJ, Ghali WA.  Effect of alcohol consumption on biological markers associated with risk of coronary heart disease: systematic review and meta-analysis of interventional studies.  BMJ 2011;342:d636; doi:10.1136/bmj.d636.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 033:  Moderate-to-heavy alcohol intake may increase risk of atrial fibrillation                  12 February 2011

A number of well-done studies have shown an increase in the risk of atrial fibrillation to be associated with heavy alcohol intake or with alcoholism.  Most previous studies suggest little if any increase in risk from light-to-moderate drinking.  The present study was a meta-analysis based on 14 studies from Europe or North America.  It showed an increase in risk with alcohol, but there were limited dose-response data to determine if there was a threshold above which the risk was increased.

Overall, the scientific evidence from many studies suggests that at least heavy drinking may increase the risk of atrial fibrillation, although whether light-to-moderate intake increases the risk seems unlikely.  Previous basic scientific data of mechanisms of atrial fibrillation have suggested that alcohol has little effect on this arrhythmia.

Reference:  Kodama S, Saito K, Tanaka S, Horikawa C, Saito A, Heianza Y, Anasako Y, Nishigaki Y, Yachi Y, Iida KT, Ohashi Y, Yamada N, Sone H.  Alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation.  A meta-analysis.  J Am Coll Cardiol 2011;57:427–436.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, click here.

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Critique 032:  Comments on alcohol in newly released Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010        9 February 2011

The United States has released new Dietary Guidelines for Amercans, 2010.  While the Key Recommendations regarding alcohol remain similar to those of earlier guidelines, there were some changes in the text that reflect increasing scientific data indicating potential health benefits of moderate drinking.  The key recommendation is as follows:

“If alcohol is consumed, it should be consumed in moderation—up to one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men—and only by adults of legal drinking age.”

Within the main body of the guidelines, comments on alcohol include the following:

“The consumption of alcohol can have beneficial or harmful effects, depending on the amount consumed, age, and other characteristics of the person consuming the alcohol. Alcohol consumption may have beneficial effects when consumed in moderation. Strong evidence from observational studies has shown that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. Moderate alcohol consumption also is associated with reduced risk of all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older adults and may help to keep cognitive function intact with age. However, it is not recommended that anyone begin drinking or drink more frequently on the basis of potential health benefits because moderate alcohol intake also is associated with increased risk of breast cancer, violence, drowning, and injuries from falls and motor vehicle crashes.”

Reference: www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/DietaryGuidelines/2010/PolicyDoc/Chapter3.pdf

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To see a copy of the section on alcohol from the new Dietary Guidelines, click here.

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Critique 031:  Wine polyphenols have a variety of beneficial effects on health 30 January 2011

Much of the protection against cardiovascular disease attributed to wine intake may relate not only to the alcohol in wine, but to its polyphenolic constituents.  This review article summarizes research into the chemistry, bioavailability, metabolism and excretion of polyphenols as well as mechanisms of their action.  As stated by the authors, “These protective effects could be due to one or many components of the complex mixture of bioavailable and bioactive compounds present in red wine including ethanol, resveratrol, flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanins, phenolic acids as well as their metabolites formed either in the tissues or in the colon by the microflora.”  The authors describe their cardioprotective effects, effects on vascular function and atherosclerosis, anti-platelet effects, effects on myocardial ischemia, and anti cancer and anti-diabetic effects.

The authors conclude that “Polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in the diet and are widespread constituents of wine, fruits and vegetables.”  Their review provides an extensive scientific literature on polyphenols in wine; it suggests multiple mechanisms by which such substances may have beneficial effects on health.

Reference:  Rodrigo R, Miranda A, Vergara L.  Modulation of endogenous antioxidant system by wine polyphenols in human disease.  Clin Chim Acta 2011;412:410-424

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research please click here.

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Critique 030:  Young rats given red wine polyphenols show less deterioration in endothelial function with ageing.                                                                                                                                                                  30 January 2011

The gradual decrease in endothelial function over time is a key factor in the development of diseases associated with ageing, especially cardiovascular disease (CVD).  Many epidemiologic studies suggest greater protection against CVD from wine than from other beverages containing alcohol, with at least one factor being the polyphenols in red wine (RWPs).

The present study in rats found that the administration of red wine polyphenols protected against ageing-induced endothelial dysfunction.  As stated by the authors: “The present findings indicate that regular intake of RWPs in the drinking water starting at young age (16 week-old) prevented the aging-related endothelial dysfunction most likely by reducing the excessive oxidative stress in the arterial wall.”  They further suggest an important role of NADPH oxidase and possibly also the angiotensin system in the abnormal vascular response in aging.  Their study showed that, “RWPs intake had also a physiological beneficial effect since it improved the physical exercise capacity of old rats.”

Forum members thought that this was an excellent paper, as it begins to delve into mechanisms by which polyphenols improve health.  A mechanism is addressed and results are consistent with the working hypothesis of a specific interaction between polyphenols and peculiar enzymes. There is a satisfying agreement between basic mechanisms and pathophysiology.

Some scientists believe that interventions to improve endothelial function (such as the consumption of red wine or other sources of polyphenols) should begin earlier in life to slow down the endothelial dysfunction that occurs with ageing.  This study in rats tends to support such a belief.

Reference: Dal-Ros S, Zoll J, Lang AL, Auger C, Keller N, Bronner C, Geny B, Schini-Kerth VB.  Chronic intake of red wine polyphenols by young rats prevents aging-induced endothelial dysfunction and decline in physical performance: Role of NADPH oxidase.  Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2011;404:743-749

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 029:  Differing opinions on the message to the public regarding alcohol consumption 16 January 2011

A Letter to the Editor entitled “What should we advise about alcohol consumption?” was recently published by Maurizio Ponz de Leon in Intern Emerg Med.1 Dr. de Leon argues that the message of health benefits of moderate drinking “seems to me hazardous and extremely dangerous to diffuse in the general population.”  His reasons included (1) many people may be unable to distinguish between low–moderate and high consumption of wine, beer or spirits, and alcohol metabolism may differ remarkably from one subject to another; (2) alcohol remains a frequent cause of car crash, and governments (in almost all western countries) try to convince or force people to abstain from drinking before driving; and (3) to consider alcohol as a medication whose consumption may contribute to improved health is another source of concern.  Dr. de Leon asks: “Are we truly at the point of prescribing alcohol consumption in order to reduce the risk of stroke and coronary damage?”  He concluded that “more studies are needed before we can give sensible recommendations on alcohol consumption to the general population.”

The de Leon editorial has prompted considerable response from other scientists, including further Letters to the Editor of the journal by Di Castelnuovo, Costanzo, Donati, Iacoviello, and de Gaetano,2 and by Estruch and Lamuela-Raventos.3 In addition, the original editorial has stimulated considerable debate among members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research.  Among key arguments presented by the Forum members, all experts in scientific research on alcohol, are that messages to the public should not be “paternalistic” (we will tell you what is best for you since you are not smart enough to understand the facts), and that guidelines must always be based on sound, balanced scientific data rather than on uninformed opinion.  Forum members emphasized that there are certain people who should not drink at all (including former abusers of drugs or alcohol, people with certain medical conditions, children and adolescents, and people with religious or moral proscriptions against alcohol), and there can never be a general recommendation for everybody to consume alcohol.  On the other hand, physicians should not withhold from their patients and the public scientifically sound and balanced data on alcohol and health.  And the data are extremely strong supporting a role for moderate alcohol intake, for appropriate adults, for the reduction in risk of coronary artery disease and other diseases of ageing.

Several Forum members pointed out that it was unfortunate that the journal had chosen to publish the original letter that castigates alcohol from an author with good scientific credentials, but little to no apparent research expertise in the subject of alcohol and health.  Many Forum members disagreed with the statement of de Leon that “Many people may be unable to distinguish between low–moderate and high consumption of wine, beer or spirits.”  A leading scientist dealing with this subject for decades, Dr. Arthur Klatsky, has written: “Most people know very well what the difference is between light to moderate drinking and binge or excessive drinking.  While some patients may rationalize their heavy drinking because of its purported health effects, I have yet to find someone who had developed alcohol abuse because of messages about the health effects of moderate drinking.”  Medical practitioners, in his view, “have a ‘solemn duty’ to tell the truth about alcohol consumption, as they understand it, to all of their patients.”  While pointing out that certain individuals will not benefit from the consumption of alcohol, several Forum members believed that it would be unethical for physicians to withhold from middle-aged or elderly subjects at risk of cardiovascular disease information on the potential benefits of light-to-moderate drinking

References:

1.  Maurizio Ponz de Leon.  What should we advise about alcohol consumption?  Intern Emerg Med, DOI 10.1007/s11739-010-0487-1.

2.  Augusto Di Castelnuovo, Simona Costanzo, Maria Benedetta Donati, Licia Iacoviello, Giovanni de Gaetano. What should we advise about alcohol consumption?  Reply letter by A. Di Castelnuovo.  Intern Emerg Med, DOI 10.1007/s11739-010-0502-6.

3.  Ramon Estruch • Rosa Ma Lamuela-Raventos.  What should we advise about alcohol consumption: reply letter by R. Estruch.  Intern Emerg Med; DOI 10.1007/s11739-010-0503-5.

For the full critique of these publications by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, click here.

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Critique 028:  Changes over time in relation of social class to mortality from cirrhosis 9 January 2011

To explore the nature of the social class gradient of cirrhosis mortality in England and Wales across the 20th century, data on male cirrhosis mortality by social class were obtained from the Registrar General’s Decennial Supplements for the years 1921–1991.  This paper describes a dramatic change during the 20th century in the association between social class and mortality from liver cirrhosis.  While deaths from cirrhosis were more common among higher social classes in the early part of the century, the pattern changed so that deaths from cirrhosis were much more common among the lower social classes by the end of the century.

Suggested reasons for the lower current rates among subjects at higher social class include different patterns of alcohol consumption, with regular moderate consumption (especially of wine with meals) becoming more common with higher social class subjects while binge drinking (especially of beer and spirits) remaining more common in lower social classes.  However, a number of other factors may relate to the class differences in rates of hepatic cirrhosis, including a less healthy diet and greater rates of obesity (associated with hepatic fatty liver and cirrhosis) among lower social class subjects and social class differences in hepatitis rates.  Further, certain medications, coffee consumption, and many other lifestyle factors are associated with hepatic cirrhosis.  The actual reasons for the changes over time reported in this paper remain unclear.

Reference:  Crombie IK, Precious E.  Changes in the social class gradient of cirrhosis mortality in England and Wales across the 20th century.  Alcohol and Alcoholism 2011;46:80–82.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, click here.

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Critique 027:  Effects of resveratrol and quercetin on inflammation and insulin resistance                  – 20 December 2010

A study was carried out to examine the extent to which quercetin and trans-resveratrol (RSV) prevented inflammation or insulin resistance in primary cultures of human adipocytes treated with tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a)—an inflammatory cytokine elevated in the plasma and adipose tissue of obese, diabetic individuals.  Cultures of human adipocytes were pretreated with quercetin and trans-RSV followed by treatment with TNF-a.  Subsequently, gene and protein markers of inflammation and insulin resistance were measured.  The authors report that quercetin, and to a lesser extent trans-RSV, attenuated the TNF-a–induced expression of inflammatory genes such as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1b, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1.

Forum members were concerned about certain aspects of the study, especially the extrapolation of in vitro results to in vivo situations.  The in vitro conditions the authors describe are minimally representative of an in vivo condition.  In vivo, after consumption of quercetin or resveratrol, these compounds undergo extensive metabolism, leading to glucuronidated, sulphated or methylated compounds.  In a previous study, quercetin 3-glucoside was transformed to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, acetate and butyrate in cells from human gut; only 3′-methylquercetin has been detected in human plasma, present at a concentration of 0.1 to 0.2 µM after 3 h.  The authors of the current paper are using concentrations up to 60 µM, concentrations which have not been found in vivo.

There were also concerns with the work on cell uptake of quercetin and resveratrol.  Primary adipocytes were incubated with the polyphenols, but it is not clear whether or not the concentrations used were subtoxic.  Our current knowledge is limited about local concentration of the molecules we are studying in subcellular compartments, their interaction with alternative targets, and eventually their transformation into products that could be more or less active on a given specific pathway.  The real difficult and important issue is the identification of a reasonable convergence — if not agreement — between data originating from extremely distant approaches.  In this case, the notion that metabolic diseases are related to a homeostatic imbalance in adipose tissue, linked to a different redox status, linked to activation of specific pathways, and that different redox sensitive polyphenols do have a protective effect, encompasses the evidence produced by extremely distant approaches.

From a clinical point of view, the role of phytochemicals acting as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents could be extremely important in inflammation-associated chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer.  Quercetin and resveratrol may indeed play an important role in this regard, and need to be investigated further to establish the clinical importance of natural dietary compounds in the prevention of chronic degenerative conditions.

Reference:  Chuang C-C, Martinez K, Xie G, Kennedy A, Bumrungpert A, Overman A, Jia W, McIntosh MK.  Quercetin is equally or more effective than resveratrol in attenuating tumor necrosis factor-a–mediated inflammation and insulin resistance in primary human adipocytes.  Am J Clin Nutr 2010;92:1511–1521.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research please click here.

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Critique 026: Chinese study suggests that alcohol increases angiographically significant coronary artery disease 8 December 2010

Among a large number of Chinese men presenting with chest pain or EKG changes, sequential subjects undergoing cardiac angiography were evaluated for obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) lesions according to their reported recent alcohol intake.  The study population consisted of 1,476 consecutive men 36 to 84 years of age; participants were categorized as nondrinkers, light drinkers, moderate drinkers, or heavy drinkers.

Adjusted odds ratios for angiographically proved CAD for light, moderate, and heavy drinking were 1.16 (95% confidence interval 0.68 to 1.94), 1.78 (1.35 to 2.27), and 2.18 (1.46 to 3.25).  Compared to non-drinking, adjusted odds ratios were 1.03 (0.54 to 1.87) for drinking 0 to 15 years, 1.61 (1.28 to 2.14) for 16 to 30 years, and 1.98 (1.23 to 3.05) for >30 years.  The authors concluded that moderate-to-heavy alcohol consumption increased the risk of CAD in Chinese men.  CAD risk tended to increase with an increase in frequency and duration of drinking.

This was a very select group of patients (those presenting with chest pain or EKG changes), and not typical of the Chinese population.  No information was available on drinking patterns or on previous alcohol intake.  Further, a recent large population-based study from mainland China showed that consumers of alcohol were less likely to develop coronary disease, results similar to those in most Western populations.  It is not possible from the present study to say that the association of alcohol intake with CAD is different between Chinese and Western populations, as the present study gives results only for a very select group of patients.

The most important outcome regarding CAD is the occurrence of clinical events (myocardial infarction, cardiac death, etc.).  The detection of such events requires long-term follow-up studies to be able to judge the overall effects of alcohol drinking on CAD.

Reference:  Zhou X, Li C, Xu W, Hong X, Chen J.  Relation of alcohol consumption to angiographically proved coronary artery disease in Chinese men.  Am J Cardiol 2010;106:1101–1103.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 025:  Pattern of drinking and type of beverage affect the relation of alcohol intake to coronary heart disease 1 December 2010

Using cohort data from Belfast and France, investigators related weekly alcohol consumption, incidence of binge drinking (alcohol >50 g on at least one day a week), incidence of regular drinking (at least one day a week, and alcohol <50 g if on only one occasion), volume of alcohol intake, frequency of consumption, and types of beverage consumed to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events over a 10 year follow-up period.  Overall, 60.5% of subjects from N. Ireland and 90.6% of French reported drinking alcohol at least once a week.  Among drinkers, 12% of men in Belfast drank alcohol every day compared with 75% of men in France.  Mean alcohol consumption was 22.1 g/ day in Belfast and 32.8 g/day in France.  Binge drinkers comprised 9.4% and 0.5% of the Belfast and France samples, respectively.

Results showed that, after multivariate adjustment, the hazard ratio for hard coronary events compared with regular drinkers was 1.97 (95% CI 1.21 – 3.22) for binge drinkers, 2.03 (95% CI 1.41 – 2.94) for never drinkers, and 1.57 (95% CI 1.11 – 2.21) for former drinkers.  The hazard ratio for hard coronary events in Belfast compared with in France was 1.76 (95% CI 1.37 to 2.67) before adjustment, and 1.09 (95% CI 0.79 to 1.50) after adjustment for alcohol patterns and wine drinking.  Only wine drinking was associated with a lower risk of hard coronary events, irrespective of the country.

The authors conclude that regular and moderate alcohol intake throughout the week, the typical pattern in middle-aged men in France, is associated with a low risk of ischemic heart disease, whereas the binge drinking pattern more prevalent in Belfast confers a higher risk.

While a strong inverse association between moderate alcohol consumption and cardiovascular disease has been demonstrated for decades, more recent research has emphasized the importance of the pattern of drinking (regular moderate versus episodic or binge drinking).  Further, there continues to be debate about the potential greater effect of wine versus other beverages containing alcohol.  This study shows that regular moderate drinking (especially of wine) is associated with lower risk of MI, but episodic or binge drinking (especially of beer or whiskey) increases the risk.  Lifetime abstinence has a similar adverse relation to CHD as does episodic or binge drinking.

Reference: Ruidavets J-B, Ducimetièere P, Evans A, Montaye M, Haas B, Bingham A, Yarnell J, Amouyel P, Arveiler D, Kee F, Bongard V, Ferrières J.  Patterns of alcohol consumption and ischaemic heart disease in culturally divergent countries: the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction (PRIME).  BMJ 2010;341:c6077 doi:10.1136/bmj.c6077.

For the detailed critique of this study by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 024:  Moderate alcohol consumption lowers risk of metabolic diseases in a population with high mean alcohol intake. 28 November 2010

A cross-sectional analysis of data from subjects in Switzerland related varying levels of alcohol intake to the presence of diabetes mellitus, the “metabolic syndrome,” and an index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).  The strengths of this paper include being population-based and having a large number of subjects who reported that they consumed 14 or more drinks/week.  Also, there was a good percentage (27%) of subjects reporting no alcohol intake during the one week of assessment used for classifying subjects.  Another strength is the careful confirmation of drinking status with state-of-the-art laboratory tests.  In multivariate analysis, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and mean HOMA-IR decreased with low-risk drinking and increased with high-risk drinking.  No differences were noted according to the type of beverage consumed.

This is a cross-sectional analysis, so a causative relation between alcohol intake and the metabolic outcomes cannot be assessed.  Still, the data support much that has been shown in prospective studies.  Several Forum members commented on potential problems when considering a number of physiologic conditions as the “metabolic syndrome” and focusing therapy on the syndrome; they believed that each metabolic factor should be evaluated and treated singly.

Reference:  Clerc O, Nanchen D, Cornuz J, Marques-Vidal P, Gmel G, Daeppen J-B, Paccaud F, Mooser V, Waeber G, Vollenweider P, Rodondi N.  Alcohol drinking, the metabolic syndrome and diabetes in a population with high mean alcohol consumption.  Diabet Med 2010;27:1241–1249.

For the detailed critique of this study by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 023:  Evidence that PPAR-gamma is a mechanism for the effects of wine polyphenolics on cardiovascular risk.                                                                                                                                                                  27 November 2010

It is important that biological mechanisms are identified for the observed inverse relation between the moderate consumption of wine and cardiovascular disease shown in most epidemiologic studies.  A paper by Zoechling et al is an elegant example of the needed effort to provide a biochemical mechanism for the biological effects of wine.  Data on binding of different wine component were produced and this result is interpreted in light of epidemiological evidence.

It would have been appropriate to provide evidence also for the actual shift of gene expression primed by the same wine component in a cell or animal model.  In this respect, results must be rated appropriate but still as preliminary; a ligand could have different effects.  Further, biological evidence is not provided to support the contention that these polyphenols act through the PPAR-gamma receptor.  The sort of evidence that should have been provided is a comparison with rosiglitazone in a cell population known to respond to PPAR-gamma agonists (e.g. adipocytes).

Further, the analytical data does not describe the amounts of any of the “active” substances.  So while there is a lot of discussion of the active components, it is not possible to compare any wine’s “activity” with the amount of the key substances.  Lacking such a comparison, it is very hard to conclude that these substances are in fact the responsible factors in the observed activity.

Nevertheless, this paper provides important data on potential mechanisms by which the constituents of wine and certain other beverages may act to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Reference:  Zoechling A, Liebner F, Jungbauer A.  Red wine: A source of potent ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ.  Food & Function, Journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry, in press.  DOI: 10.1039/c0fo00086h.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, click here.

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Critique 022: Alcohol consumption decreases with the development of disease 21 November 2010

In a cross-sectional study from the 2004 and 2007 Australian National Drug Strategy Household (NDSH) surveys, respondents were questioned about their current and past drinking, the presence of formal diagnosis for specific diseases (heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cancer, anxiety, depression) and self-perceived general health status.  The sample sizes for the 2004 and 2007 NDSH surveys were 24,109 and 23,356, respectively.

The authors report that respondents with a diagnosis of diabetes, hypertension, or anxiety were more likely to have reduced or stopped alcohol consumption in the past 12 months.  The likelihood of having reduced or ceased alcohol consumption in the past 12 months increased as perceived general health status declined from excellent to poor (although the authors do not point out that lifetime abstainers were more likely than moderate drinkers to report less than excellent health status).

The authors conclude that the experience of ill health is associated with subsequent reduction or cessation of alcohol consumption (“sick quitters), which is consistent with most prospective epidemiologic studies.  The authors also conclude that this may at least partly underlie the observed ‘J-shaped’ function relating alcohol consumption to premature mortality.  On the other hand, most modern epidemiologic studies are careful not to include “sick quitters” within the non-drinking category, and relate health effects of drinkers with those of lifetime abstainers.  Further, prospective studies in which alcohol intake is assessed at different times (rather than having “changes” based only on recall at one point in time, as was done in this study) usually indicate that subjects who decrease their intake are more likely to subsequently develop adverse health outcomes, especially related to cardiovascular disease, than those who continue moderate drinking.

Reference:  Liang W, Chikritzhs T.  Reduction in alcohol consumption and health status.  Addiction 2010; in press (doi:10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03164.x).

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 021:   Alcohol consumption affects risk of cataracts 25 October 2010

A population-based prospective study from Australia utilized repeated lens photographs over a period of 5 to 10 years to diagnose cataracts among more than 2,500 subjects.  The investigators related the risk of their development, and the risk of cataract surgery, to the reported alcohol intake of subjects.  Previous research has provided some biological mechanisms that make an association between alcohol and cataracts plausible.

Overall, the present study showed few statistically significant relations between alcohol and cataracts, although adjusted results suggested a “U-shaped” association between total alcohol intake and development of cataracts (a lower risk for moderate drinkers, higher risk for both abstainers and heavier drinkers).  The U-shaped association with alcohol consumption was stronger for the risk of cataract surgery.  These results are consistent with previous cohort studies.  On inspection of the data presented, the potential reduction in risk of cataract was primarily for wine and beer.  While some types of cataract may be reduced by moderate drinking, larger intake of alcohol may be associated with increased risk.

Reference:  Kanthan GL, Mitchell P, Burlutsky G, Wang JJ.  Alcohol Consumption and the Long-Term Incidence of Cataract and Cataract Surgery: The Blue Mountains Study.  Am J Ophthalmol 2010;150:434–440.

For the full critique of this paper by members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, click here.

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Critique 20:  New data on effects of alcohol during pregnancy                                                                                                 12 October 2010

A very large population-based observational study from the UK found that at the age of 5 years, the children of women who reported light (no more than 1-2 units of alcohol per week or per occasion) drinking did not show any evidence of impairment on testing for behavioral and emotional problems or cognitive ability.  There was a tendency for the male children of women reporting “heavy/binge” drinking during pregnancy (7 or more units per week or 6 or more units per occasion) to have poorer behavioral scores, but the effects were less clear among female offspring.

Scientific data continue to indicate that higher intake of alcohol during pregnancy may adversely affect the fetus, and could lead to very severe developmental or other problems in the child.  However, most recent publications (as does this one) show little or no effects of occasional or light drinking by the mother during pregnancy.  They also demonstrate how socio-economic, education, and other lifestyle factors of the mother may have large effects on the health of the fetus and child; these must be considered when evaluating the potential effects of alcohol during pregnancy.

Overall, current scientific data indicate that while drinking during pregnancy should not be encouraged, there is little evidence to suggest that an occasional drink or light drinking by the mother is associated with harm.  Heavy drinking, however, may be associated with serious developmental defects in the fetus.

Reference: Kelly YJ, Sacker A, Gray R, Kelly J, Wolke D, Head J, Quigley MA.  Light drinking during pregnancy: still no increased risk for socioemotional difficulties or cognitive deficits at 5 years of age?  J Epidemiol Community Health 2010; doi:10.1136/jech.2009.103002

Addendum:  After the above critique was prepared, a new paper has been published on the topic by O’Leary et al (O’Leary CM, Nassar N, Kurinczuk JJ, de Klerk N, Geelhoed E, Elliott EJ, Bower C.  Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Risk of Birth Defects  Pediatrics 2010;126;e843-e850; DOI: 10.1542/peds.2010-0256).  Overall, the results of that study are similar to those of the study by Kelly et al, with no increase in risk of birth defects in children born of women reporting low or moderate drinking during pregnancy but with an increased risk of defects among children of women reporting heavy drinking.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 019:  Both alcohol and caffeinated coffee intake are associated with lower risk of diabetes in African-American women.                                                                                                                  27 September 2010

In a very large cohort of African-American women in the US, the association between the consumption of alcohol, tea, and coffee was related to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus over a follow-up period averaging 12 years.  Tea and decaffeinated coffee showed no relation with diabetes, but the intake of both caffeinated coffee and alcohol showed a significant inverse association.

This paper is particularly important because some previous studies have not shown a strong association between alcohol and the risk of cardiovascular disease among African-Americans.  African-Americans, especially women, tend to drink little alcohol, yet are at markedly increased risk of diabetes.  In the present study, the approximately 30% lower risk for moderate alcohol drinkers was about the same in these African-American women as has been found in many previous studies of whites.

Reference

Boggs DA, Rosenberg L, Ruiz-Narvaez EA, Palmer JR.  Coffee, tea, and alcohol intake in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes in African American women.  Am J Clin Nutr 2010;92:960–966.

For the detailed critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 018: Alcohol consumption following diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer may increase risk of recurrence of cancer but not total mortality risk 14 September 2010

In the Life After Cancer Epidemiology (LACE) study, 1,897 participants diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer between 1997 and 2000 and recruited on average 2 years post-breast cancer diagnosis were evaluated for the association between alcohol intake and breast cancer recurrence and death.  The women, who were generally light drinkers, were followed for an average of 7.4 years.  The study reported an increase in risk of breast cancer recurrence and breast cancer death, but no effect on total mortality, to be associated with consumption of 3 to 4 or more drinks per week when compared with women not drinking following their cancer diagnosis.

Previous research has been mixed on this topic.  Almost all large studies have shown no increase in all-cause mortality for women who drink moderately following a diagnosis of breast cancer (as does this study).  As for recurrence of breast cancer, most have shown no increase in risk, although one previous study of women with estrogen-receptor + tumors found an increased risk of a primary cancer developing in the contralateral breast to be associated with alcohol intake of more than 7 drinks per week.

Because of conflicting results among studies on this topic, further research will be needed to determine the extent to which alcohol following a diagnosis of breast cancer may relate to subsequent disease and death.

Reference:  Kwan ML, Kushi LH, Weltzien E, Tam EK, Castillo A, Sweeney C, Caan BJ.  Alcohol Consumption and Breast Cancer Recurrence and Survival Among Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer:The Life After Cancer Epidemiology Study.  J Clin Oncol 2010;28 (published ahead of print, 10.1200/JCO.2010.29.2730)

For the detailed critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here.

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Critique 017:  Moderate alcohol intake is associated with a lower risk of total mortality than are either abstinence or heavy drinking                                                                                                                            5 September 2010

In a study based on data from 1,824 predominantly Caucasian Americans from the Western part of the United States, alcohol consumption at baseline was related to mortality risk during a 20-year follow-up period.  Subjects were recruited into a longitudinal project that has examined late-life patterns of alcohol consumption and drinking problems.  Lifetime abstainers were not included in the study, which focused on stress and coping processes among problem drinkers and non-problem drinkers.  The sample at baseline included only subjects aged 55 to 65 years who had had outpatient contact with a health care facility in the previous 3 years.

The database at baseline included information on daily alcohol consumption, sociodemographic factors, former problem drinking status, health factors, and social-behavioral factors.  Subjects who were not lifetime abstainers but did not report drinking at the time of the baseline examination were classified as “abstainers.”  Data on potential changes in alcohol consumption during the course of the study were not collected.  Death during follow up was confirmed primarily by death certificate.

The key results of the paper are that even when adjusting for sociodemographic factors, former problem drinking status, health factors, and social-behavioral factors, moderate drinking was associated with considerably lower risk of all-cause mortality.  In comparison with “moderate drinkers” (subjects reporting up to 3 drinks/day), abstainers had 51 % higher mortality risk and heavy drinkers had 45% higher risk.  The study supports most previous scientific studies showing that moderate drinking, in comparison with both abstinence and heavy drinking, is associated with lower risk of total mortality.

Reference:  Holahan CJ, Schutte KK, Brennan PL, Holahan CK, Moos BS, Moos RH.  Late-Life Alcohol Consumption and 20-Year Mortality.  Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2010;34:in press, November 2010

For the detailed critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, click here.

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Critique 016:  Association of alcohol with breast cancer risk varies according to subtype of tumor

29 August 2010

Most studies show a slight increase in the risk of breast cancer for women who consume alcohol.  The association is thought to relate to alcohol’s effects on hormones, and alcohol use tends to be more strongly associated with hormonally sensitive breast cancers than tumors not sensitive to hormones.  Few studies have evaluated how alcohol-related risk varies by breast cancer subtype.  In the present study, follow-up data from 87,724 women in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study prospective cohort were evaluated for the relation of baseline alcohol consumption with subsequent breast cancer.

A total of 2,944 invasive breast cancer patients were diagnosed during follow up.  In multivariable-adjusted analyses alcohol consumption was associated with an increase in the risk of lobular carcinoma (which makes up approximately 15-20% of breast cancers), but there was not a statistically significant association with the more-common ductal type of carcinoma.  Hormone + cancers showed an association with alcohol intake, but not hormone – cancers.  The findings support the importance of hormonal mechanisms in mediating the relation between alcohol use and breast cancer risk.

Reference Li CI, Chlebowski RT, Freiberg M, Johnson KC, Kuller L, Lane D, Lessin L, O’Sullivan MJ, Wactawski-Wende J, Yasmeen S, Prentice R.  Alcohol consumption and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer by subtype: the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study.  J Natl Cancer Inst 2010 Aug 23. [Epub ahead of print]

For the detailed critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, click here : Critique 016.

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Critique 015: Moderate drinking does not appear to increase risk of breast cancer among women with a BRCA gene mutation                                                                                                                 22 August 2010

A large study was carried out to assess the effects of alcohol consumption on breast cancer risk among women with a BRCA1 or a BRCA2 gene mutation, both of which markedly increase the risk of breast cancer.  Comparisons were made between women with a gene mutation who had developed invasive breast cancer matched with women with the same gene mutation who had not developed breast cancer.  After a number of appropriate exclusions, there were 1,480 matched pairs with BRCA1 mutations and 445 pairs with BRCA2 mutations.

Data from the study support an earlier report suggesting no increase in breast cancer risk from alcohol intake for women with either gene mutation.  In the previous study on this topic, a slight lowering of breast cancer risk was noted with light drinking among women with the BRCA2 mutation but not among those with the BRCA1 mutation.  In the present study, a possible reduction in risk of breast cancer was seen for moderately drinking women with the BRCA1 mutation, but not the BRCA2 mutation.  Further, in the present study, the reduction is risk of breast cancer was seen only for wine consumers.  While one should not over-interpret epidemiologic data in the absence of identified biologic mechanisms, there have been a very large number of experimental studies showing that certain polyphenols present in wine actively impede the initiation and growth of cancer cells.

Overall, current scientific data suggest that alcohol in moderation does not increase the risk of breast cancer among women with a BRCA mutation, and wine may be somewhat protective.  If this is indeed the case and given the high risk associated with these genetic mutations, it would be important to inform women with such a mutation that moderate alcohol does not appear to increase their risk of breast cancer.

Reference:  Dennis J, Ghadirian P, Little J, et al:  The Hereditary Breast Cancer Clinical Study Group.  Alcohol consumption and the risk of breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.  The Breast 2010; e-pub.

For the detailed critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, click here.

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Critique 014: Moderate drinking, especially of wine, is associated with better cognitive function   13 August 2010

A large prospective study of men and women in northern Norway reported that moderate wine consumption was independently associated with better performance on cognitive tests after 7 years of follow up.  There was no consistent association between consumption of beer or spirits and cognitive test results.  The authors also reported that abstinence was associated with significantly lower cognitive performance in women.  As noted by the authors, in any observational study there is the possibility of residual confounding by other lifestyle habits affecting cognitive function, and the present study was not able to adjust for certain ones (e.g., diet, income, or profession) but did adjust for age, education, body mass index, depression, and cardiovascular disease and its major risk factors.

The results of this study support findings from a number of observational, prospective studies that have shown that the moderate consumption of alcohol, especially of wine, may have favorable effects on cognitive function.  Such effects could relate to the presence in wine of a number of polyphenols and other substances that reduce the risk of cognitive decline with ageing.  Mechanisms that have been suggested for such protection against cognitive dysfunction include effects on atherosclerosis, coagulation, inflammation, as well as direct neuroprotective effects.

Reference:  Arntzen KA, Schirmer H, Wilsgaard T,  Mathiesen EB.  Moderate wine consumption is associated with better cognitive test results: a 7 year follow up of 5033 subjects in the Tromsø Study.  Acta Neurol Scandd 2010; Suppl 190:23-29.

For the detailed critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, click here.

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Critique 013:   Greater than moderate alcohol intake increases the risk of liver cirrhosis 27 July 2010

A new meta-analysis shows that alcohol consumption is a strong factor in the development of cirrhosis of the liver.  The study also supports the theory that there is a threshold of drinking above which the risk is increased, as some of their analyses suggest that the risk increases only with intake of more than 24 grams/day of alcohol for women (about 2 typical drinks by US standards) and 36 grams/day of alcohol for men (about 3 typical US drinks).

Despite some concerns about the approach used, our Forum agrees that the present meta-analysis supports previous studies indicating a strong role of heavy alcohol drinking in the development of cirrhosis.  The differences found by the investigators between the effects of moderate alcohol intake on cirrhosis morbidity and on cirrhosis mortality are difficult to explain, but may relate to misclassification of alcohol intake (heavy drinkers reporting less alcohol), always a problem in observational studies of the effects of alcohol.

The results related to morbidity suggest that small amounts of alcohol are not associated with an increased risk of cirrhosis, and may be associated with lower risk of disease.  Thus, the data provide evidence for a “threshold effect” of alcohol intake for the development of cirrhosis.  Limited previous data are available suggesting that wine consumption may be associated with lower risk of cirrhosis than the intake of other beverages, but essentially all studies show heavy drinking of any type of beverage increases the risk.

Reference:  Rehm J, Taylor B, Patra SM, Irving H, Baliunas D, Patra J, Roerecke M.  Alcohol as a risk factor for liver cirrhosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.  Drug and Alcohol Review 2010,29,437–445.  DOI: 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00153.x

For the detailed critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, click here.

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Critique 012: Moderate drinking in the elderly is associated with lower total mortality 23 July 2010

The effects of alcohol consumption in the elderly may be modified by a decreased ability to metabolize alcohol, an altered volume of distribution due to reduced lean body mass and total body water, and an increased prevalence of co-morbid conditions.  These factors make this study of the net effects of drinking among a large number of community-dwelling elderly men and women especially important.

In large prospective studies from Australia of men aged 60-79 and women aged 70-75 years of age, men consuming up to 4 drinks/day and women up to 2 drinks/day had considerably lower risk of dying (total mortality) than did non-drinkers.  For subjects reporting 1-2 drinks/day, their total mortality risk was about 20-30% lower than that of abstainers.

While the authors concluded that not consuming alcohol on 1 or 2 days per week was associated with better outcomes, this conclusion is not in accordance with their own data.  The benefit of one or two “alcohol-free” days per week has never been substantiated with solid evidence from any large epidemiological study.

Our Forum review concludes that in terms of total mortality risk, recommendations for very low levels of drinking among the elderly may be overly restrictive, as this study showed lower total mortality for up to 4 drinks/day for elderly men and 2 drinks/day for elderly women.  Further, this study does not provide support for the conclusion that mortality is lower for people who have 1 or 2 “alcohol-free” days per week.

Reference:  McCaul KA, Almeida OP, Hankey GJ, Jamrozik K, Byles JE, Flicker L. Alcohol use and mortality in older men and women.  Addiction 2010.  On-line prior to publication:  doi:10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.02972.x

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, click here

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Critique 011:  A Review of the Proposed New US Dietary Guidelines                                                       14 July 2010

Members of our International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research have submitted a detailed review of the draft recently circulated by the United States Department of Agriculture for proposed new US Dietary Guidelines for 2010.  In general, Forum members were very pleased with the alcohol recommendations in the proposal, finding them interesting, balanced, and accurate.  Many commented that, rather than just focusing on warnings against heavy drinking, the new Guidelines appear to take into account the large amount of recent epidemiologic and experimental data that support many potential beneficial health effects of moderate drinking.

Among specific recommendations from the Forum were the following:

■          A stronger statement is needed of the effects of light-to-moderate drinking on total mortality, in that recent prospective studies show a considerably lower of risk of death for moderate drinkers.

■          Additional emphasis is needed on the reduced risk of developing diabetes for moderate drinkers, and the much lower risk of cardiovascular disease among diabetics who consume some alcohol.

■          Further information should be presented on the consistent scientific data showing that women who drink moderately are at reduced, not increased, risk of weight gain in adult life.

There were a number of topics not discussed in the draft Guidelines that members of the Forum thought deserved consideration for inclusion.

■          Recent reports have consistently shown that among people who have already had a myocardial infarction or other cardiovascular event, moderate drinking is associated with a reduced risk of further cardiovascular events and death.

■          More emphasis in the Guidelines should be put on the pattern of drinking (regular moderate rather than occasional binge drinking) and also on the much lower blood alcohol levels after drinking when the beverage is consumed with food, rather than on an empty stomach.

■          It was also suggested to the Guidelines Committee that the beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk of polyphenols and other substances in wine and certain beers, in addition to alcohol, be discussed more adequately.

There were also some suggestions from ISFAR regarding future research needs in the field.

■          The Forum strongly supports the need for further research on the risks and benefits of light-to-moderate alcohol consumption, rather than focusing research only on alcohol abuse.

■          The Forum proposed emphasis on future research dealing with targeting recommendations for groups of people according to age, gender, other behaviors, etc., although there was some disagreement among Forum members as to whether or not moderate drinking has strong health effects in the young and not just in middle-aged and older adults.

■          ISFAR considers moderate drinking, unless contraindicated by certain conditions (e.g, former abuse, some types of severe liver disease), to be an important aspect of a healthy lifestyle.  It should be a complement, not an alternative, to other lifestyle factors such as not smoking, getting exercise, eating a healthy diet, and avoiding obesity.

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The draft of the proposed new Dietary Guidelines is available at http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/DGAs2010-DGACReport.htm.

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For the full ISFAR critique of the proposed new Guidelines, click here

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Summary Critique 010                                                                                            30 June 2010

Should moderate alcohol consumption be advised following a heart attack?

There has been considerable recent interest in the effects of alcohol consumption following an acute myocardial infarction (AMI).  In an observational study among 325 subjects who were moderate drinkers prior to an AMI, 84% continued to drink and 16% quit.  While most of the outcome measures showed no statistically significant effects between the two groups of patients, all outcomes showed a tendency towards better physical and mental health outcomes for persistent drinkers in comparison with those who quit drinking.

A key problem with this analysis, and with all observational epidemiologic studies on this topic, is that the reason that some subjects stopped drinking after having an AMI, while others continued to drink, is not known.  Even though adjustments were made for many known related factors, there is always the possibility that subjects who stopped drinking were “sicker” in many ways than those who persisted in their alcohol consumption.

It may well require a randomized trial, in which some subjects having an AMI are randomly advised to continue to drink and others advised to stop drinking, to be able to determine reliably the effects on the clinical course of the persistence of alcohol intake following an AMI.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here:  Critique 010

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Summary:  Critique 009                                                                                   25 June 2010

Should moderate alcohol consumption be advised for its health effects?

A report from a conference that took place at the Medicine Grand Rounds at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, on January 15, 2009 has recently been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, JAMA.  It provides a discussion by an epidemiologist with a broad knowledge in the field in response to a theoretical question, as from a middle-aged patient, as to the advisability of consuming some alcohol “for his health.”

The paper provides an excellent discussion of a theoretical question about drinking and health.  It focuses on the potential risks and benefits associated with moderate drinking for a middle-aged male patient.  Most members of the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research (ISFAR) were pleased with the discussion of the topic.  It was noted how uncommon it is that such knowledgeable, detailed, and mostly objective data appear in the mainstream medical literature.  It was thought to be “readable, informative and thoughtful.”

The ISFAR critique points out a number of topics that were covered incompletely in the paper, including inadequate information on the importance of the pattern of drinking: moderate regular consumption versus binge drinking.  Further, there was a notable lack of information on the beneficial effects on many pathophysiologic processes of polyphenols and other non-alcohol substances present in wine and certain other foods and beverages.

Overall, it was believed that the paper provided important information for physicians who may be discussing alcohol consumption with their patients.

Reference

Clinical Crossroads: Conferences with patients and doctors.  A 42-year-old man considering whether to drink alcohol for his health.  Kenneth J. Mukamal, MD, MPH, Discussant.  JAMA 2010;303:2065-2073. (doi:10.1001/jama.2010.550)

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here:  Critique 009.

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Summary: Critique 008: 13 June 2010

Further evidence that moderate alcohol consumption may play a role in the prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease

In a case-control study from Spain on the effects of smoking and alcohol use on the risk of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), the authors found that the risk of AD was unaffected by any measure of tobacco consumption.  On the other hand, alcohol consumers showed a 47% lower risk of developing AD than did never consumers, with effects mainly among women and among never smokers.  No differences were noted by type of alcoholic beverage consumed.  The authors conclude that mean daily total consumption of alcohol showed increasingly protective dose-response relationships in women.

The numbers in this analysis were rather small, and there is always the possibility of confounding by other lifestyle factors.  Still, the study supports a number of previous epidemiologic studies showing a lower risk of developing AD for moderate consumers of alcohol.

Reference

García AM, Ramón-Bou N, Porta M.   Isolated and joint effects of tobacco and alcohol consumption on risk of Alzheimer’s Disease.   Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease 2010;20:577–586. (DOI 10.3233/JAD-2010-1399).

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here: Critique 08.

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Summary:  Critique 007                                                                  9 June 2010

People may change to a “healthier” pattern of drinking as they age

In a prospective longitudinal study of a cohort of Americans in the “Baby Boomer” generation, subjects’ drinking habits were assessed at two points, when they were approximately 53 years of age and again when they were approximately 64 years of age.  As the subjects got older, they began to consume fewer drinks per occasion but to consume alcohol more frequently; the net effect was little change in total alcohol intake for women but a slight increase for men.

In most epidemiologic studies, regular moderate drinking is the pattern associated with lower risk of many chronic diseases; hence, the described change in drinking pattern in this study (smaller amounts on more frequent occasions) can be considered a “healthy” change.  Most long-term observational studies show a decrease in total alcohol intake with ageing, although reasons for such are poorly understood.

This paper emphasizes the importance of knowing the pattern of drinking, and not just the total number of drinks consumed over a week, when evaluating the impact of alcohol consumption on health and disease.

Reference

Molander RC, Yonker JA, Krahn DD.  Age-related changes in drinking patterns from mid- to older age: results from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study.  Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2010;34 (Published early online 7 May 2010).

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here: Critique 07.

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Summary:  Critique 006 2 June 2010

For patients who already have cardiovascular disease, continued moderate alcohol consumption may reduce their risk of death

This review paper in Circuation summarizes data from 8 epidemiologic studies of subjects with cardiovascular disease (CVD) as to their subsequent mortality (both CV and total-mortality) according to their alcohol consumption.  Most studies showed significantly lower risk of both CV and total mortality for patients with CVD who were consumers of alcohol.

Despite these clear-cut findings, the authors were very cautious in their conclusions, focusing on the dangers of excessive drinking and not encouraging cardiovascular patients who do not drink to start regular drinking.   They state that moderate consumers of alcohol who have CV disease should not be advised to stop drinking, but should be advised to not consume alcohol more heavily.

It is interesting that these authors published the meta-analysis upon which this review is largely based in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology earlier in 2010.  In that paper, their conclusions were less restrained: “Cardiologists should be aware that regular, moderate alcohol consumption, in the context of a healthy lifestyle (increased physical activity, no smoking), dietary habits (decreased dietary fat intake, high consumption of fruit and vegetables), and adequate drug therapy, would put their patients at a level of cardiovascular or mortality risk substantially lower than either abstainers or heavy or binge drinkers.”

Reference

Costanzo S, Di Castelnuovo A, Donati MB, Iacoviello L, de Gaetano G.  Contemporary Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine.   Cardiovascular and overall mortality risk in relation to alcohol consumption in patients with cardiovascular disease.  Circulation 2010;121;1951-1959.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here: CRITIQUE 006.

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Summary: Critique 005                                                                   27 May 2010

Alcohol in young women may increase their risk of benign breast disease

Among more than 6,000 young women being followed in a longitudinal study, 67 confirmed cases of benign breast disease (BBD) were diagnosed.  Alcohol consumption was reported on 57 women who developed BBD when they were 16 – 23 years of age, with all but 8 subjects being 18 or older when they reported alcohol intake, and no data were presented on potential exposures earlier following menarche.  A significant increase in the risk of BBD was associated with alcohol intake, although many key factors that have been shown to relate to BBD were not reported in the paper.  Hence, while the number of cases is small, and a number of potential risk factors are not included, this study suggests that BBD may be increased by alcohol consumption in young women.

Reference

Berkey CS; Willett WC; Lindsay Frazier A; Rosner B; Colditz GA; Rockett RH; Helaine RM.  Prospective study of adolescent alcohol consumption and risk of benign breast disease in young women.  Pediatrics 2010;125:e1081-e1087.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here: CRITIQUE 005.

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Summary: Critique 004                                                                 24 May 2010

Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with other healthy lifestyle factors

An analysis based on a very large number of subjects in France demonstrates, as have most other studies, that moderate consumers of alcohol have many associated healthy lifestyle habits: lower levels of body mass index, blood glucose, heart rate, stress and depression scores; higher subjective health status, HDL-cholesterol values, levels of physical activity and social status.   The authors suggest that alcohol is not related causally to any of these factors, and that the other lifestyle factors, not alcohol consumption, are the reason that moderate drinkers have less cardiovascular disease.  They chose a very narrow group of citations from the literature to support this contention.

The authors ignore a large number of well-conducted prospective epidemiologic studies showing that moderate drinkers are at lower risk over time of developing certain risk factors.  Further, the authors of this paper ignore an immense basic science literature that suggests that alcohol is an important factor in the development of biological risk factors, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease.  Further, they do not describe a number of studies that have shown specifically that moderate drinking is associated with less cardiovascular disease and diabetes among subjects who are otherwise very healthy (non-smokers, not obese, physically active, and on a healthy diet).

There is no doubt that confounding by associated lifestyle factors can play a role in the lower risk of chronic diseases among moderate drinkers, who tend to also have other healthy behaviors.  However, there is now a large body of scientific evidence that indicates that alcohol is an important factor in the lower rates of such diseases; current scientific data do not support the conclusions of the authors of this paper.

Reference

Hansel B, Thomas F, Pannier B, Bean K, Kontush A, Chapman MJ, Guize L, Bruckert E.  Relationship between alcohol intake, health and social status and cardiovascular risk factors in the urban Paris-Ile-De-France Cohort: is the cardioprotective action of alcohol a myth?  European J Clin Nutrition, advance online publication, doi:10:1038/ejcn.2010.61.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here: CRITIQUE 004.

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Summary: Critique 003                                                                17 May 2010

Moderate alcohol consumption markedly reduces the risk of diabetes mellitus, even among subjects with otherwise very healthy lifestyles

In a very well-done analysis from a large Dutch population, it was shown that moderate drinking considerably lowers the risk of developing type 2 diabetes even among subjects who are otherwise following a healthy lifestyle (not obese, non-smokers, physically active, eating a healthy diet).  Thus, it indicates that the effect of moderate drinking on lowering the risk of diabetes cannot be explained by other healthy lifestyle habits of such drinkers.  Moderate drinking should be considered as a complement, and not as an alternative, to other healthy lifestyle habits that lower the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and coronary heart disease.

Reference

Joosten MM, Grobbee DE, van der A DL, Verschuren WWM, Hendriks HFJ, Beulens JWJ.  Combined effect of alcohol consumption and lifestyle behaviors on risk of type 2 diabetes.  Am J Clin Nutr 2010;91: 1777-1783.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here: CRITIQUE 003.

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Summary: Critique 002                                                                 26 April 2010

Red wine, but not other types of alcohol, improve endothelial function in a randomized trial

The healthy state of cells that form the lining of arteries, assessed by indices of endothelial function, is a key factor associated with preventing the development and progression of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease.  In a randomized trial among healthy young adults, the daily consumption of about 3 ounces of red wine for three weeks led to significant improvement in endothelial function.  Such improvements were not seen with the consumption of water, or of beer or vodka containing similar amounts of alcohol.

Further, in a series of in-vitro studies, the authors showed very similar effects from red wine and from a high concentration of resveratrol (but not from beer or ethanol) on factors associated with improved endothelial function.  The study supports many epidemiologic and animal experiments suggesting that certain non-alcoholic constituents of red wine have additional beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk over those of just the alcohol itself.

Reference

Huang PH, Chen YH, Tsai HY, Chen JS, Wu TC, Lin FY, Sata M, Chen JW, Lin SJ.  Intake of red wine increases the number and functional capacity of circulating endothelial progenitor cells by enhancing nitric oxide bioavailability.  Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 2010;30:869-877.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here: CRITIQUE 002.

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Summar: Critique 001                                                                         24 April 2010

Genetic effects on alcohol metabolism modify the relation of alcohol to breast cancer

A study from Germany compared the association between alcohol and breast cancer risk according to genetic variations affecting levels of alcohol dehydrogenase, an enzyme that clears alcohol from the blood stream.  The authors conclude that genetic factors associated with the slow clearance of alcohol are associated with increased risk of breast cancer for drinkers; an increase in cancer risk was not seen for drinkers with genetic factors leading to fast clearance of alcohol.  Such a finding would suggest that alcohol itself is the cause of an increase in breast cancer risk among drinkers.

Unfortunately, some previous studies have shown the opposite, that an increase in breast cancer risk occurs only among women who have genes associated with fast, rather than slow, alcohol metabolism.  Overall, current scientific data indicate that breast cancer’s relation to drinking is not resolved, remaining murky and conflicted, and perhaps overemphasized. This facet of that murkiness is itself also conflicted.  As of now, it is unclear the degree to which genes affecting alcohol dehydrogenase modify the association between alcohol and the risk of breast cancer and other diseases.

Reference

Larsen SB, Vogel U, Christensen J, Hansen RD, Wallin H, Overvad K,     Tjønneland A, Tolstrup I.    Interaction between ADH1C Arg272Gln and alcohol intake in relation to breast cancer risk suggests that ethanol is the causal factor in alcohol related breast cancer.  Cancer Letters, 2010, in press.

For the full critique of this paper by the International Scientific Forum on Alcohol Research, please click here: CRITIQUE 001.

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