Architecture

Daniel Bluestone

f-daniel-bluestone226 Bay State Road, Room 104
Telephone: TBD
Fax: (617) 353-3243
E-mail: dblues@bu.edu

Director, Preservation Studies Program, AMNESP;
Professor of History of Art & Architecture
B.A., Harvard College;
Ph.D., University of Chicago

Professor Bluestone is a specialist in nineteenth century American architecture and urbanism.. Mr. Bluestone’s Buildings, Landscapes, and Memory: Case Studies in Historic Preservation (W.W. Norton, 2011) received the Society of Architectural Historians 2013 Antoinette Forrester Downing Book Award for “the most outstanding publication devoted to historical topics in the preservation field that enhances the understanding and protection of the built environment.”  The book surveys the changing history, nature, and politics of historic preservation in the United States between the early 19th century and today.  Mr. Bluestone’s book Constructing Chicago (1991) was awarded the American Institute of Architects International Book Award and the National Historic Preservation book prize.

Richard Brown

brown_pic725 Commonwealth Ave, Rm 301
Boston, Massachusetts 02215
Telephone: (617) 358-6021
Fax: (617) 353-1441
E-mail: rlbrown8@bu.edu

curriculum vitae

Lecturer, Architecture;
A.B., Princeton University; M.Arch., Yale University.

Claire Dempsey

CLAIRE_DEMPSEY226 Bay State Rd (Room 108)
Boston, Massachusetts 02215

Telephone: (617) 353-9910
Fax: (617) 353-2556
E-mail: dempseyc@bu.edu

curriculum vitae

Associate Professor of American and New England Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. AM, Wheaton College; MA, Boston University.

 

Ms. Dempsey has taught architectural history and research methods courses in the Program since 1991. She has conducted preservation research within the compliance, identification, and evaluation areas for the Massachusetts Historical Commission and for a number of cities, towns, and research institutions. Research for New England area museums and historic sites has complemented her preservation work, for clients including the Haverhill Historical Society; Old Sturbridge Village; the Dickinson Homestead, Amherst, MA; the Mashantucket Pequot Museum, Ledyard, CT; and the John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley Heritage Corridor (National Park Service). Ms. Dempsey is the author of Building Hardwick: Community Histories in Landscape and Architecture, co-author of The Historical and Archaeological Resources of Central Massachusetts and The Historic and Archaeological resources of Cape Cod and the Islands, and contributor to Building Portsmouth: the Neighborhoods and Architecture of New Hampshire’s Oldest City (1992) and The Early Architecture and Landscapes of the Narragansett Basin (2001). She serves as archivist for the Vernacular Architecture Forum and as president of its New England Chapter.

Melanie Hall

hallpic725 Commonwealth Ave, Rm 205A
Boston, Massachusetts 02215
Telephone: (617) 353-1476
Fax: (617) 353-3243
E-mail: hallmj@bu.edu

curriculum vitae

Director of Museum Studies; Associate Professor; B.A., University of Leeds
Melanie Hall is an Associate Professor, teaching courses in American and English architecture and preservation, decorative arts, and Museum Studies. She is currently the Director of Museum Studies. She joined the department in 1999 and has had extensive experience of museums and historical agencies. She studied Fine and Decorative Art History at the University of Leeds. Her career began as research assistant at the Henry Moore Institute, Leeds City Art Galleries, York. For many years she worked for the Historic Monuments and Buildings Commission for England on a nation-wide survey of historic houses and towns. She has lectured on this work at Maddingley Hall, University of Cambridge, University of Leeds, Univeristy of Hull, and as a specialist lecturer to the National Trust. Prior to coming to the United States she was Senior Lecturer in Heritage Studies at Nottingham Trent University.

Prof. Hall is co-founder and director of the International Preservation Forum, which brings together specialists from many countries. She is an expert advisor to the Heritage Memorial Fund (England), the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association, and Antiques America.

Her publications include over 30 historic districts and towns reports for the British government, articles and reviews in Furniture History, Architectural History, and Transactions of the Ancient Monuments Society. Her recent work on the origins of the English National Trust is in publication with Yale University Press, Studies in British Art series. Her current research focuses on museums dedicated to poets and writers, and landscape preservation in New England and England.

Keith Morgan

SV500799725 Commonwealth Ave, Rm 210A
Boston, Massachusetts 02215
Telephone: (617) 353-1441
Fax: (617) 353-3243
E-mail: knmorgan@bu.edu

curriculum vitae


Director of Architectural Studies, Boston University
Professor; American and European Architecture
B.A., The College of Wooster,
M.A., Winterthur Program of the University of Delaware
Ph.D., Brown University

A scholar of nineteenth and twentieth century American and European architecture, Professor Morgan is interested in the relationships between architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture. Professor Morgan has taught at Boston University since 1980. He has served as the director of the Preservation Studies Program and of the American and New England Studies Program and as the chairman of the Art History Department on two occasions. He is a former national president of the Society of Architectural Historians. His recent publications include Shaping a New American Landscape: The Art and Architecture of Charles A. Platt, Boston Architecture, 1975-1990, which he coauthored with Professor Naomi Miller, and a new introduction for the republication of Charles Eliot, Landscape Architect. He is the editor and one of the principal authors for Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, and serves as the architecture editor for The Encyclopedia of New England. He has received research grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. He serves on the Executive Committee of the Buildings of the United States project, several committees for the restoration of historic landmarks and is a trustee of the Hancock Shaker Village.

Paolo Scrivano

paolopic725 Commonwealth Ave, Rm 202C
Boston, Massachusetts 02215
Telephone: (617) 358-6021
Fax: (617) 353-3243
E-mail: scrivano@bu.edu

curriculum vitae
Assistant Professor; Modern Architecture;
D.Arch., Ph.D., Politecnico di Torino

Professor Paolo Scrivano joined Boston University after having taught at the Politecnico di Milano and at the University of Toronto. He graduated in Architectural History from the Politecnico di Torino and, from the same university, received a PhD in History of Architecture and Town-Planning. He has been Visiting Scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Post-doctoral Fellow at the Politecnico di Torino, Visiting Scholar at the Canadian Centre for Architecture, Visiting Senior Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts of the National Gallery of Art, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Research Grant recipient, and Boston University Humanities Foundation Junior Fellow.
Professor Scrivano’s research focuses on 19th and 20th century architecture with a specific interest for historiography and the postwar years. He has organized symposia and exhibitions, edited books and contributed essays and chapters to collective works. His publications and activities include the volumes Tra Guerra e Pace. Società, Cultura e Architettura nel Secondo Dopoguerra (1998, as co-editor), Storia di un’idea di architettura moderna. Henry-Russell Hitchcock e l’International Style (2001), Olivetti Builds: Modern Architecture in Ivrea (2001, with Patrizia Bonifazio), the exhibition “Building the Human City: Adriano Olivetti and Town-Planning” (2002) and the organization of the international conference “The Americanization of Postwar Architecture” (2005). More recently, he has authored the article Architecture in The Palgrave Dictionary of Transnational History (2009) and co-edited two monographic issues for the journals Architecture and Ideas (“Experimental Modernism”, 2009) and Visual Resources (“Intersection of Photography and Architecture”, 2011). He is currently completing a new book titled Building Transatlantic Italy: Architectural Dialogues with Postwar America.

Alice Tseng

Tsengpic725 Commonwealth Ave, Rm 210C
Boston, Massachusetts 02215
Telephone: (617) 353-1458
Fax: (617) 353-3243
E-mail: aytseng@bu.edu

Associate Professor, Japanese Art & Architecture
B.A., Columbia University; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University

curriculum vitae

Professor Tseng specializes in the art and architecture of Japan, with particular focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Specific topics of research interest are the history of institutional buildings, collections, exhibitions, and transnational and transcultural connections between Japan and Euro-America. She offers lecture courses on the arts of Asia; the arts of Japan; and modern Japanese architecture; and seminar courses on Japanese print culture; the Edo-Meiji transition; and Kyoto architecture and urbanism. Professor Tseng has received fellowships from numerous institutions and foundations, including the Fulbright Foundation, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (National Gallery of Art), J. Paul Getty Foundation, Metropolitan Center for Far Eastern Art Studies, American Council of Learned Societies. She was the recipient of the 2006 Founder’s Award from the Society of Architectural Historians for her article “Styling Japan: The Case of Josiah Conder and the Museum at Ueno, Tokyo.” Her book The Imperial Museums of Meiji Japan: Architecture and the Art of the Nation was published by the University of Washington Press in 2008. She is currently writing a book on the monuments of modern Kyoto.