GRAF Newsletters

December 2009

December 1st, 2009 in GRAF Newsletters.

# Guy Rossatanga-Rignault (*) publie un article intitulé: “Laver le corps: Symbolique et thérapeutique de l’eau en Afrique” dans le nº 2 (volume A-2008) de la Revue de la Fondation Raponda-Walker pour la Science et la Culture, consacré au theme de “L’homme et la maladie” (pp. 91-106) . La revue est disponible aux Éditions Raponda-Walker, B.P. 7969 Libreville, Gabon.

# Catherine Coquery Vidrovitch (*) vient de faire paraître un oucrage intitulé“Enjeux politiques de l’histoire coloniale” (Paris: Agone, 2009; 192 pages; € 14,00 – ISBN 978-2-7489-0105-4) L’auteur s’interroge: “Notre patrimoine historique «national» doit-il inclure l’histoire de la colonisation et de l’esclavage colonial? La réponse positive, de bon sens, ne fait pas l’unanimité: soit parce que parler sans tabou du domaine colonial serait «faire repentance», soit parce que l’ignorance ou la négligence entretenues depuis plusieurs générations font qu’il ne vient même pas à l’esprit de beaucoup de nos concitoyens que notre culture nationale héritée n’est pas seulement hexagonale.” Elle conclut: “La culture française (que d’aucuns veulent appeler «identité nationale») résulte de tous les héritages mêlés dans un passé complexe et cosmopolite où le fait colonial a joué et continue par ricochet de jouer un rôle important.

L’ouvrage comporte les chapitres suivants: • La prise de conscience de la question coloniale • L’histoire du statut de l’indigène • La première génération des historiens post-coloniaux • L’histoire des colonisés «vue d’en bas» • Un hiatus à combler • La relativité du silence colonial • Le déficit de l’école • Le cas particulier de l’esclavage • La fin d’un tabou? • Travers & apport du postcolonial • Une histoire «postcoloniale» française en train de s’écrire • Mémoire & histoire: un débat amputé ? • Une querelle politique séculaire • De la confusion entre histoire & politique • Le quiproquo sur les «abus» coloniaux • Un faux concept: la repentance • Du «communautarisme» à la «fracture coloniale» • Du racisme colonial • Le mythe des peuples premiers • Le passé colonial au present.

On trouvera quelques unes des réactions provoquées par la lecture de ce livre sur le site: http://atheles.org/agone/passepresent/enjeuxpolitiquesdelhistoirecoloniale/index.html

@ Jeanne Koopman (*) has published an article titled: “Globalization, Gender, and Poverty in the Senegal River Valley,” in the referred journal Feminist Economics 15 (3), July 2009, pp. 253-285. This had earlier been presented as a paper at a workshop sponsored by the International Association for Feminist Economics held at the United Nations in May 2008.

November 2009

November 16th, 2009 in GRAF Newsletters.

# Gauthier de Villers (*) vient de publier un important ouvrage intitulé: “République démocratique du Congo – De la guerre aux élections: L’ascension de Joseph Kabila et la naissance de la Troisième République (janvier 2001-août 2008)” (Paris: L’Harmattan & Tervuren: Musée royal de l’Afrique centrale, 2009; coll. ‘Cahiers africains/Afrika Studies, nº 75; 478 p. 42; € 42,00 – ISBN: 978-2-296-07750-8).

# Guy Rossatanga-Rignault (*) et Douglas Yates (*) ont animé (avec Roland Pourtier) un séminaire organisé le 5 novembre par le programme ‘Afrique subsaharienne’ de l’Ifri (Institut français des relations internationales) autour du thème “Quelles évolutions pour le système gabonais?”

# Theodore (Ted) Trefon (*) a dirigé la publication d’un ouvrage collectif intitulé “Réforme au Congo (RDC): Attentes et désillusions” (Paris: L’Harmattan & Tervuren: Musée royal de l’Afrique centrale, 2009; coll. ‘Cahiers africains/Afrika Studies, nº 76; 275 p. ISBN: 978-2-296-10204-0), pour lequel il a composé un chapitre introductif (pp.11-34). L’ouvrage est le prolongement d’une réflexion amorcée lors d’une conférence internationale organisée en février 2008 par le Centre belge de référence pour l’expertise sur l’Afrique centrale (E-CA-CRE-AC) autour du thème “Congo : État, Paix, Économie et Bien-être”.

October 2009

October 16th, 2009 in GRAF Newsletters.

@ Adeline Masquelier (*) has just published a new book Women and Islamic Revival in a West African Town (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2009, 376 pages, $27.95). This ethnographic study follows the career of a charismatic Muslim preacher in Niger and documents the engagement of women in the religious debates that are refashioning their everyday lives. Earlier this year Masquelier published an essay in an edited volume: “Lessons from Rubí: Love, Poverty, and the Educational Value of Televised Dramas in Niger” in Love in Africa. Jennifer Cole and Lynn M. Thomas, eds. pp.204-228. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Adeline Masquelier is the Executive co-Editor of the Journal of Religion in Africa (website at: http://www.brill.nl/jra).

@ Eileen Julien (*) has published Travels with Mae: Scenes from a New Orleans Girlhood, which appeared over the summer of 2009 from Indiana University Press). Julien, Biodun Jeyifo and Karin Barber met in Hong Kong in May with other contributors to LAWH (Literature: A Word History), a project of the Stockholm Collegium of World Literary History.

# Guy Martin (*) a donné la leçon inaugurale sur le thème “Introduction à la Citoyenneté en Afrique” lors de la 2ème session de l’Académie de Droit et Justice Constitutionnels en Afrique” qui s’est tenue à Yaoundé du 27 juillet au 8 août 2009 sous les auspices de l’IGC (Initiatives de Gouvernance Citoyenne), une ONG de droit camerounais [voir leur site à: http://www.citizens-governance.org/spip.php?rubrique2&lang=fr ].

Guy Martin est également l‘auteur du chapitre “Fighting Terrorism in the Horn of Africa and the Sahel”, inclus (pp. 172-188) dans l’ouvrage collectif inititulé “Assessing George W. Bush’s Africa Policy & Suggestions for Barack Obama and African Leaders” (New York: iUniverse, 2009; 304 pages – ISBN-10: 1440154546 / ISBN-13: 978-1440154546).

# Marc Michel (*) a publié : “Essai sur la colonisation positive. Affrontements et accomodements en Afrique noire (1830-1930)” [ Paris, Perrin, 2009. 417 pp.; € 22,00 - ISBN-10: 2262024863 - ISBN-13: 978-2262024864].

@ Andreas Mehler (*) has published an article titled: “Peace and Power Sharing in Africa: A Not So Obvious Relationship” in African Affairs 2009 -108: pp. 453-473 [doi:10.1093/afraf/adp038] in which he notes: “Peace accords usually involve top politicians and military leaders, who negotiate, sign, and/or benefit from an agreement. What is conspicuously absent from such negotiations is broad-based participation by those who should benefit in the first place: citizens. More specifically, the local level of security provision and insecurity production is rarely taken into account. The analysis of recent African peace agreements shows important variations in power-sharing devices and why it is important to ask who is sharing power with whom. Experiences with power sharing are mixed and far less positive than assumed by outside negotiators.”

May 2009

May 1st, 2009 in GRAF Newsletters.

# Theodore Trefon (*) participera le 12 juin au séminaire sur le thème “Démocratisation, développement et réformes de gouvernance en République Démocratique du Congo: le travail de la communauté internationale vu par le bas” avec une communication intitulée: “Réformes au Congo: bilan d’un échec partagé”. Le séminaire est organisé par le programme ‘Afrique subsaharienne’ de l’Institut français des relations internationales (Ifri) à Paris. Pour le programme du séminaire, voir http://www.ifri.org/files/Afrique/Prog_Sem_RDC_public_site.pdf

# Pierre Englebert (*) has just published a new book titled: “Africa: Unity, Sovereignty, and Sorrow” [Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2009; 429 p.; ISBN: 978-1-58826-646-0 –$65.00 (hardbound)/ ISBN: 978-1-58826-623-1 –$26.50 (ppb)]. Though the demise of one or another African state has been heralded for nearly five decades, the map of the continent remains virtually unchanged. By and large, these states are judged failures. And yet they endure. Pierre Englebert asks why: Why do these oppressive and exploitative, yet otherwise ineffective, structures remain broadly unchallenged? Why do Africans themselves, who have received little in the way of security, basic welfare, or development, continue to embrace their states and display surprising levels of nationalist fervor? He finds his answer in the benefits that sovereign weak states offer to Africa’s regional and national elites—and to those who depend on them. The book reveals a pattern of reproduction of a predatory, dysfunctional state in which human integrity is sacrificed to its territorial counterpart.

@ Milton Krieger (*) has published a book on “Cameroon’s Social Democratic Front: its history and prospects as an opposition political party” (Bamenda: Langaa Research and Publishing, 2008; paper, 111 pp. The publisher is Francis Nyamnjoh’s new English language venture, up past 25 titles now, branching out from original base of new and reprint poetry and stories by Cameroonians into politics and history, with a few writers from elsewhere. African Books Collective and MSU Press are distributors.

@ Samba Gadjigo (*) opened the series of five recent French language films from Africa at Williams College with a talk entitled: “Africa from the Other Side of the Mirror: African Filmic Representations” Monday, February 9th. The series includes Mahamat-Saleh Haroun’s Daratt, Laurent Salgues’s Dreams of Dust, S. Pierre Yameogo’s Delwende, Cheikh Djemaï’s Frantz Fanon, and Abderrahmane Sissako’s Bamako.

@ Irène Assiba d’Almeida (*) et Sonia Lee ont publié un article intitulé : « L’essai au féminin en Afrique francophone: les travaux d’Aminata Traoré et de Tanella Boni » dans Cultures Sud (Notre Librairie)172 janvier-mars (2009) Numéro spécial sur L’engagement au féminin (111-120).

@ Luc Sindjoun (*) a publié un article intitulé: “Positivism, ethics and politics in Africa” dans l’International Review of Sociology, vol.19, No1, March 2009, pp.23-50.

# Célestin Monga (*) vient de publier un nouvel ouvrage: “Nihilisme et négritude” (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 2009 – Collection: Perspectives critiques; 272 pages; € 21,00 -ISBN-10: 2130573665 / ISBN-13: 978-2130573661).

# Le français en Afrique (Revue du Réseau des Observatoires du Français Contemporain en Afrique Noire)

Le numéro 24 de la Revue Le français en Afrique vient de paraître. Il est consacré intégralement à l’ouvrage de Ladislas Nzesse intitulé Le français au Cameroun : d’une crise sociopolitique à la vitalité de la langue française (1990-2008). Le livre de L. Nzesse, enseignant-chercheur à l’université de Dschang, comporte une première partie consacrée à “La dynamique des langues au Cameroun et la créativité lexicale dans la presse camerounaise” et une seconde partie centrée sur un ‘Inventaire des particularités lexicales”. Il s’ouvre par une préface d’Ambroise Queffélec et se clôt par une importante postface du professeur Dassy de l’université de Yaoundé I. Le livre (181 pages) peut être commandé au laboratoire “Bases corpus et langage” UFR Lettres, Arts et Sciences Humaines 98, Bd E. Herriot 06204 Nice Cedex au prix de 20 euros (+ frais de port). Il est aussi mis en ligne comme les précédents numéros sur le site http://www.unice.fr/ILF-CNRS/ofcaf/24/24.html.

Le numéro 23 comporte 12 articles, 5 résumés de thèse et 2 comptes-rendus. La version informatisée est consultable à l’adresse suivante : http://www.unice.fr/ILF-CNRS/ofcaf/23/23.html.

Le numéro 25, à paraître en fin d’année 2009, est en préparation. Responsable de la publication: Ambroise QUEFFELEC. La revue paraît prioritairement sous forme papier. Les numéros sont à commander au prix de 15 euros l’exemplaire (plus frais de port) auprès du laboratoire “Bases, Corpus et Langages”. UFR Lettres, Arts et Sciences Humaines. 98, boulevard Edouard Herriot, BP 3209, 06204 NICE CEDEX 3.

Si vous même, vos collègues ou vos étudiants avez des propositions de contribution, envoyez un courriel à Ambroise QUEFFELEC [AJMQUEFFELEC@AOL.com] (en annonçant un titre et un résumé).

# Philippe Hugon (*) a publié “L’Économie du développement et la pensée francophone” (Paris: PUF/EAC, 2008). La deuxième édition de sa “Géopolitique de l’Afrique” (Paris: Sedes) et la sixième edition de “L’Économie de l’Afrique” (Paris: La Découverte; coll. ‘Repères’) ont paru début 2009.

@ Gordon D. Cumming (*) recently published a book titled “French NGOs in the Global Era: A Distinctive Role in International Development” (Palgrave Macmillan; 252 p.; $74.95). The book uses a case study from Cameroun to examine how the development work of French NGOs is shaped by their relationship with the French state.

@ Irène Assiba d’Almeida (*) has published her latest book: A Rain of Words: A bilingual Anthology of Women’s Poetry in Francophone Africa [Une pluie de mots: Anthologie bilingue de la poésie des femmes en Afrique francophone] at Virginia Press University. The poems in this bilingual anthology are translated by Janis A. Mayes. A Rain of Words is the first comprehensive attempt to survey the poetic production of women in West and Central Africa, collecting work by forty-seven poets from a dozen francophone African countries. Some are established writers; others are only beginning to publish their work. Almost none of the poems here have been published outside of Africa or Europe or been previously translated into English. The introduction is a critical essay by Irène Assiba d’Almeida that places women’s poetry in the context of recent African history, characterizes its thematic and aesthetic features, and traces the process by which the anthology was compiled and edited. Also included is an essay by translator, Janis A. Mayes, discussing language politics, the cultural contexts within which the poetry emerges, and literary translation strategies. This landmark bilingual collection–the result of ten years of research, collection, editing, and translation–offers readers of English and French entry into a flourishing and essential genre of contemporary African literature.

For further information, see: www.upress.virginia.edu/books/d%27almeida.HTM.

# Jean-Claude Tchatchouang (*) va publier dans le courant de l’année une anthologie intitulée “Une Certaine idée du Cameroun: Anthologie des cent meilleurs livres camerounais du XXéme siècle” Ce livre s’adresse à toux ceux — lecteurs avertis, érudits ou simples curieux— qui souhaitent connaître la production écrite camerounaise parue au cours des soixante deniers années.

@ Célestin Monga (*) appeared as the guest speaker at the 30th anniversary celebration of the Humphrey Fellowship Program at Boston University on May 8. The occasion also included a symposium on “The Humphrey Experience in Action: Global Networks and Local Leadership”.

@ Adeline Masquelier (*) published an article titled: «Witchcraft, Blood-Sucking Spirits, and the Demonization of Islam in Dogondoutchi, Niger», pp. 131-160 in the section «Les religions universalistes face au schème sorcellaire» of Cahiers d’Études Africaines no. 189-190 (2008), an issue published under the general title: “Territoires sorciers”. In no.191 of the same journal, Koffi Anyinefa (*) has an article titled: «Scandales».

Abstracts at: http://etudesafricaines.revues.org/index10302.html & http://etudesafricaines.revues.org/index11912.html

@ Achille Mbembe (*) publie un article intitulé «Le ‘lumpen-radicalisme’ du président Jacob Zuma» dans le numéro de juin 2009 du Monde diplomatique.

# Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch (*) vient de publier un nouvel ouvrage intitulé “Enjeux politiques de l’histoire coloniale” (Paris: Agone, 2009; Collection: Passé et Présent; 150 pp.; € 14,00 – ISBN-10: 2748901053 / ISBN-13: 978-2748901054). Elle a également participé, ainsi que Bogumil Jewsiewicki (*), à la confection du recueil dirigé par l’historienne (et ex-‘première dame’ du Mali) Adama Ba Konaré et intitulé “Précis de remise à niveau sur l’histoire africaine, à l’usage du Président Sarkozy” (Paris: La Découverte, 2008; Coll.: ‘Cahiers libres’; 348 pp.; € 22,00) –l’un des nombreux ouvrages suscités par réaction au “discours de Dakar” de Nicolas Sarkozy (26 juillet 2007).

@ Fallou Ngom (*) and Toyin Falola have co-edited a volume titled: “Oral and Written Expressions of African Cultures” (Carolina Academic Press, 2009; 264 pp; $28.00 – ISBN-10: 1594606471 -ISBN-13: 978-1594606472). Fallou Ngom has also published an article on: “Ahmadu Bamba’s Pedagogy and the Development of Ajami Literature”, in African Studies Review, Vol. 52 (1), pp.99-124. In addition, he delivered a keynote speech titled: “African Languages & Linguistics and Knowledge Production about Africa in the 21st Century” at the conference “African Languages and Linguistics Today: 40th Anniversary Celebration” held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, April 9-11.

@ Guy Martin (*) has published (with Mueni wa Muiu) A New Paradigm of the African State: Fundi wa Afrika (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009; 271pp. ISBN-13: 978-0-230-60780-4; ISBN-10: 0-230-60780-2). The book introduces a new paradigm to study the African state, Fundi wa Afrika. According to this paradigm, the current African predicament may be explained by the systematic destruction of African states and the dispossession, exploitation, and marginalization of African people through successive historical processes—the trans-Atlantic slave trade, imperialism, colonialism, and globalization. In this book (which includes case studies of the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Africa), the authors argue that a new, viable, and modern African states based on five political entities—the Federation of African States—should be built on the functional remnants of indigenous African political systems and institutions and based on African values, traditions an culture. Guy Martin may be contacted at martingu@wssu.edu or guy2martin@yahoo.com.

@ Theodore Trefon(*) has published an aticle titled: “Public Service Provision in a Failed State: Looking Beyond Predation in the Democratic Republic of Congo” in the Review of African Political Economy 36.119, March 2009, 9–21 (Abstract at: http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/03056240902863587 ).

“The state is dying but not yet dead” and “the state is so present, but so useless” are also commonly heard refrains. These popular sentiments, inexorably expressed in all of the country’s languages by the poor and the well-to-do, have been described by development experts and political scientists as state failure. But why is the state still so powerful and omnipresent in the daily lives of these people wronged by colonial oppression, dictatorship, economic underdevelopment and more recently, unresolved political transition? How, concretely, does the state manifest itself? Does the raison d’être of the Congolese state go beyond the violence of exploitation and predation? The objective of this article is to respond to these questions, contributing to our understanding of the function and dysfunction of the Congolese state, notably during the post-Mobutu transition.

# Mes transes à trente ans (Escapade ruandaise)

Texte intégral, établi et présenté par Jean-Paul Kwizera (Centre Ecritures, Université Paul Verlaine-Metz). Collection Littératures des mondes contemporains, série Afriques, n° 5, publiée par le Centre Ecritures, Université Paul Verlaine-Metz, 475 pages, juin 2009, 22€.

Plusieurs années avant la publication de L’Enfant noir par Camara Laye, – œuvre souvent considérée comme le premier roman autobiograhique francophone en Afrique –, Saverio Nayigiziki rédigeait Mes transes à trente ans, long récit de sa vie, de ses amours et de ses tourments. L’ouvrage, jugé exceptionnel par un jury littéraire en Europe, ne fut à cette époque publié que sous une forme raccourcie, sous le titre Escapade ruandaise. C’est qu’on attendait alors, de la part d’un auteur africain, ni un texte si long, ni une plongée si profonde dans les méandres d’une conscience individuelle. On en attendait encore moins des perspectives si modernes sur la vie sociale de son pays, que le protagoniste de cette fiction voyageuse parcourt en tous sens ; il en explore toutes les frontières, géographiques, morales, existentielles, culturelles ; il en sonde les solidarités, à l’heure où le Rwanda se prépare aux grandes mutations que constitueront la fin de la période mandataire et ensuite l’indépendance nationale. Pérégrin inlassable, amoureux hésitant, figure d’inquiet, Justin est une figure saisissante de la modernité.

• Commande et information: recherchell@univ-metz.fr ou steiner@univ-metz.fr

# Pierre Halen (*) et Désiré K. Wa Kabwe-Segatti (Université de Johannesbourg) ont co-dirigé la publication d’un ouvrage collectif intitulé “Du nègre Bambara au métropolitain. Les littératures africaines en contexte transculturel” (Centre Ecritures, Université Paul Verlaine-Metz, 331 pages, 2009 – Collection Littératures des mondes contemporains, série Afriques, n°4).

# Edmond Kwam Kouassi (*) a fourni une contribution intitulée: “L’Afrique et le nouvel ordre mondial” (pp. 191-205) au septième et dernier volume (“Le XXe siècle de 1914 à nos jours”) de la monummentale Histoire de l’humanité publiée par l’UNESCO. (Paris: UNESCO, 2009; Collection Histoire plurielle; 2254 ;pages, 172 ill. en N/B, 29 tabl., 8 fig., 20 cartes, index, notes, bibliogr.; 26,00 € – ISBN: 978-92-3-204083-1). La version anglaise a été publiée en 2008.

Par ailleurs, il vient de mettre la dernière main (en avril) à un projet de création d’une Ecole Supérieure Internationale de Droit et de Science Politique (EDSPO-BENIN) basée à Ouidah. Selon son promoteur, «EDSPO-BENIN est destiné à former des jeunes africains titulaires du baccalauréat dans les spécialités du droit et de la science politique, de la première année de licence au doctorat.» Dans la présentation de ce projet, il souligne : «L’éducation, après avoir été pendant longtemps prise en charge par l’Etat et les institutions religieuses appelle à présent l’attention des associations de la société civile, pour plusieurs raisons et notamment :

- la baisse générale et généralisée de la qualité de l’enseignement,
- la faible et la médiocrité des moyens publics disponibles,
- la saturation des infrastructures d’accueil,
- la défaillance voire la déficience dans la formation des éducateurs et dans l’encadrement des apprenants,
- la faiblesse des programmes d’éducation civique,
- l’absence de l’éthique dans les programmes de formation et de l’approche interactive dans les méthodes ;pédagogiques,
- la négligence dans les programmes de la dimension panafricaine d’enseignement des langues d’où la nécessité ;d’introduire deux ou trois langues panafricaines comme l’Arabe, le Swahili et le Haoussa.(…)

Ainsi, face aux besoins sans cesse croissants auxquels l’Etat, principal acteur et responsable de l’éducation ne peut pleinement faire face, les promoteurs, à travers EDSPO-BENIN, se donne pour mission de soutenir, de renforcer et de consolider les interventions, les initiatives et les efforts des autorités publiques dans le domaine de l’enseignement supérieur et notamment dans le domaine des sciences juridiques et politiques.

Ulf Engel, Andreas Eckert, Robert Kappel, Alain Ricard, Richard Banégas, Roland Marchal, Laurent Fourchard et bien d’autres ont participé à divers titres à la 3éme Conference européenne d’études africaines (ECAS3) organisée par l’AEGIS à l’Université de Leipzig (4-7 juin). Pour le programme de la conference, voir:

http://www.uni-leipzig.de/%7Eecas2009/documents/conference%20book%20ecas_web.pdf

http://www.uni-leipzig.de/~ecas2009/index.php?option=com_docman&Itemid=24

L’Afrique du siècle des Lumières: savoirs et représentations

Sous la direction de Catherine Gallouët, David Diop, Michèle Bocquillon et Gérard Lahouati

STUDIES ON VOLTAIRE AND THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (SVEC 2009:05)

ISBN 978-0-7294-0959-9, xxx+307 p., 38 ill., £65 / €80 (hors taxe) / $100

VOLTAIRE FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD email@voltaire.ox.ac.uk / www.voltaire.ox.ac.uk

Les répresentations de l’Afrique au dix-huitième siècle s’affirment comme ‘véridiques’ alors même que le continent et ses habitants sont très mal connus. Pour analyser ce paradoxe, une équipe de spécialistes a examiné ces représentations selon deux perspectives. Il s’agissait de comprendre comment des fictions s’enracinaient dans des textes qui se donnaient comme des récits de voyages authentiques, et comment cet imaginaire a pu déterminer des comportements réels, susciter aussi bien le mouvement de colonisation que les combats pour l’émancipation des esclaves. Plus qu’un inventaire des descriptions de l’Afrique, ce volume interdisciplinaire et abondamment illustré propose une réflexion sur ses représentations, sur leurs racines, leurs fonctions idéologiques et leur diffusion.

Les ports et la traite négrière

«Cahiers des Anneaux de la Mémoire» 18, rue Scribe – 44000 NANTES

N°10 – Nantes: 16,00 euros / 253 p. (10 articles)

N°11 – France: 16,00 Euros / 275 p. (16 articles) http://www.lesanneauxdelamemoire.com/Cahiers/cahiers1011.htm

N°12 – Création plastique, traites et esclavage

(*) Names listed in the GRAF Directory / Noms figurant à l’annuaire du GRAF

Subscriptions to the GRAF Newsletter are $10 per year

(Checks payable to / chèques à l’ordre de : Boston University, African Studies Center/GRAF)

Le prix de l’abonnement annuel au Bulletin du GRAF est de $10

October 2008

October 1st, 2008 in GRAF Newsletters.

@ René Lemarchand’s (*) latest book “The Dynamics of Violence in Central Africa” has just been published by the University of Pennsylvania Press (October 2008) [328 pages; $59.95 -ISBN-10: 0812241207 - ISBN-13: 978-0812241204].

# Achille Mbembe (*) a contribué sous la forme d’un chapitre intitulé: «L’intarissable puits aux fantasmes» (pp. 91-132) à l’ouvrage collectif “L’Afrique de Sarkozy. Un déni d’histoire” [Jean-Pierre Chrétien (dir.); Paris, Karthala, 2008, 203 p. ISBN : 978-2-8111-0004-9]. On y trouvera également un texte de Jean-François Bayart (*) «Y a pas rupture, patron!» précédemment publié sur le Web.

@ Béatrice Hibou (*) delivered a paper titled “Labor Discipline, Political Discipline in Tunisia: Complex and Ambiguous Relationships” at the research workshop on “African Labor in Colonial and Post-Colonial Contexts” organized by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Tel-Aviv University on June 11­12. In the same workshop, Jean-François Bayart (*) offered a paper titled: “Hegemony and coercion: the politics of the chicotte (whipping)”.

@ Fallou Ngom (*) contributed a chapter titled “Forensic Language Analysis in Asylum Applications of African Refugees: Challenges and Promises”, in: Toyin Falola, Niyi Afolabi & Aderónke Adésolá Adésànyà, eds. “Migrations and Creative Expressions in Africa and the African Diaspora” (Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2008), pp. 219-237.

# Des écrivains, professeurs, critiques et cinéastes de divers horizons ont participé les 9-10 à Dakar à un colloque ayant pour thème “Ousmane Sembène, un homme dans son temps”, sous forme d’hommage à cet écrivain et cinéaste un an après son décès, le 9 juin 2007 à l’âge de 84 ans. Parmi les participants, figurait Samba Gadjigo (*), son biographe officiel, auteur notamment de “Ousmane Sembène, une conscience africaine – Genèse d’un destin hors du commun” paru en 2007, après la mort du cinéaste. Y participaient également Eileen Julien (*), Manthia Diawara, réalisateur de “Bamako sigui-kan” (“Le pacte de Bamako“) et d’autres personnalités du monde littéraire.

@ Edmond Kwam Kouassi (*) has published a article titled: “Negotiation, Mediation and other Non-Juridical Ways of Managing Conflicts in Pre-Colonial West African Societies”, in the journal International Negotiation 13:2 (2008) pp. 233–246. The journal is published by Brill NV, Leiden (www.brill.nl/iner), and pdf copies are available from GRAF upon request.

@ Thomas Hale (*) is conducting research for a book on “France, Francophonie and Africa” that deals with the politics of culture and the culture of politics. It ranges from the pre-colonial to the present. He has assembled a large bibliography on the subject during the last two decades, but is now looking for anecdotal information from inside the meetings of francophone heads of state held by the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie every two or three years. Any help on this subject as well as others concerning francophonie in Africa would be much appreciated. Contact him at <tah@psu.edu> or at this address: Thomas A. Hale , Department of French and Francophone Studies – 231 Burrowes Building, The Pennsylvania State University – University Park, PA 16802 (tel: 1-814-865-1054 / messages: 1-814- 865-0214).

@ Robert Kappel (*) has published a monograph titled “Die Economic Partnership Agreements – kein Allheilmittel für Afrika” (nº 06/2008) in the series is edited by Andreas Mehler (*) at the GIGA Institute of African Affairs in Hamburg. For contact and information, go to : http://www.giga-hamburg.de/giga-focus/afrika.

@ Alan J. Kuperman (*) reviewed two recent books on Darfur (Julie Flint & Alex de Waal: Darfur – A Short History of a Long War; and Eric Reeves: A Long Day’s Dying: Critical Moments in the Darfur Genocide) in the latest issue (Vol. 10: 2) of the Journal of Genocide Research.

@ Catherine Boone (*) published an aticle titled: “Property and Constitutional Order: Land Tenure Reform and the Future of the African State”, in African Affairs 106/425 (2007), pp. 557-586. In it, she argues that the debate over land law reform in Africa has been framed as a referendum on the market – that is, as a debate pitting advocates of the growth-promoting individualization of property rights against those who call for protecting the livelihoods and subsistence rights of small farmers. This article argues that the prospect of land law reform also raises a complex bundle of constitutional issues. In many African countries, debates over land law reform are turning into referenda on the nature of citizenship, political authority, and the future of the liberal nation state itself. The article describes alternative land reform scenarios that are currently under debate, and identifies the constitutional implications of each. The practical salience of the issues is illustrated through reference to land reform politics in Côte d’Ivoire, Uganda, South Africa, and Tanzania. This article was presented as a paper at the 2005 annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, and the 2006 annual meeting of the African Studies Association. It grew out of discussions held at the Social Science Research Council Regional Advisory Panel (SSRC RAP) for Africa ‘Planning Meeting on Citizenship’, 27 September 2003, in Amsterdam.

# Le colloque de Cerisy qui a été consacré en 2006 à la postérité littéraire de Senghor a rassemblé des universitaires mais aussi des écrivains francophones africains. L’héritage de celui que le congolais Sony Labou Tansi nommait « le Roi Senghor » a donc été évalué à la fois à travers une analyse concernant la place de l’œuvre et de la pensée dans des milieux littéraires situés sur plusieurs continents (Amérique, Antilles, Maghreb, Congo, Madagascar) et dans le témoignage de ceux que l’on aurait pu penser être ses héritiers directs. La diversité des origines et des positions des différents collaborateurs de ce volume permet de multiplier les points de vue et de comprendre comment l’œuvre de Senghor peut être tour à tour omniprésente, admirée, remise en question ou totalement ignorée. Sans prétendre établir de bilan, l’ensemble de ces contributions constitue un large panorama sur la circulation, dans l’espace et dans le temps, de l’œuvre de Senghor Dominique Ranaivoson a rassemblé ces textes qui sont maintenant publiés sous le titre: “Senghor et sa postérité littéraire” [Centre ECRITURES, Université Paul Verlaine-Metz, Littératures des mondes contemporains 3, Série Afriques, 2008; 196 p.; ISBN : 978-2-917403-02-0. Pour le commander, envoyer un courriel à : steiner@univ-metz.fr ou recherchell@univ-metz.fr.

# Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch (*) offered a presentation titled: «Les implications des catégories coloniales de désignation (noir, nègre, sujet, indigène, assimilés)» in a research session devoted to “Representations of ‘Blacks’ in western, ‘Arab’ or Muslim societies in the Deconstruction of ‘blackness’” during the Summer Institute held at Aix-en-Provence (august 23-29) on the theme: «Blacks or Negroes», «Africans or Hyphenated Afros», «Slave descendants or Immigrants» : Deconstructing the categories of designation and questioning the representations of identity in the past and present. This research and teaching programme aimed at analyzing the ways that the categories associated with somatic differences, often perceived and qualified as "racial," have affected our understanding of the historical migration of enslaved Africans, the racialist legacy of slavery, and the persistence of slavery today. It was organized by the Institut Interdisciplinaire Virtuel des Hautes Études sur les Esclavages et les Traites (IVHEET) in cooperation with seven other institutions, among which are: l’Université Cheikh Anta Diop of Sénégal, the Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on the Global Migrations of African Peoples at York University (Toronto) and the Chaire de recherche du Canada en histoire comparée de la mémoire, Université Laval, (Québec). For futher information, see:
http://peresclave.over-blog.com/categorie-10228218.html and links.

@ Théodore Trefon(*) will act as rapporteur and discussion leader during the International Symposium to be held at the Royal Museum for Central Africa, in Brussles (December 8th – 9th, 2008) on the theme: “The quest for natural resources in Central Africa. The case of the mining sector in DRC” Attendance at the symposium is by invitation only. Individuals or institutions that wish to attend should get in touch with Dr. Sabine Cornelis at: sabine.cornelis@africamuseum.be. For furher information (and the programme),
see: http://www.africamuseum.be/research/dept4/colloquium-dec08/research/dept4/colloquium-dec08/index_html

# Max Liniger-Goumaz (*) vient d’ajouter un nouveau tome à la série: “Guinea Ecuatorial, bibliografia general” (volume XV), publié, comme les précédents par les Editions du Temps, Genève (360 pages, €15,00). Dans le numéro d’août 2008 du Monde diplomatique, Augusta Conchiglia commente: “Commencée en 1974, après quelques années passées en Guinée-Equatoriale pour le compte de l’Unesco, cette bibliographie monumentale rassemble désormais près de soixante mille références! (...) Les ouvrages, études et articles signalés dans les quinze volumes font de ce pays africain le seul à disposer d’un instrument de connaissance si complet et si fouillé.”

# Michel Cahen (*), Alice Sindzingre (*), Vincent Foucher (*), Laurent Fourchard (*), Andreas Mehler (*), Linda Beck (*), Nicolas van de Walle (*), Pierre Englebert (*), Alain Ricard (*), Dominique Darbon (*), Tony Chafer (*), Comi Toulabor (*) et Augustin Loada (*) figurent parlmi les participants au Congrès international d’analyse politique sur l’Afrique organisé les 3-5 septembre par l’IEP-Bordeaux de l’Université Montesquieu-Bordeaux IV à l’occasion du cinquantenaire du CEAN (Centre d’étude d’Afrique noire).

Le thème de cette rencontre était “Penser la République: État, gouvernment, contrat social en Afrique”.

Le programme du Congrès est affiché sur le site: http://www.cean.cinquantenaire.sciencespobordeaux.fr/Programme_Congres_CEAN_3-5_septembre_IEP_de_Bordeaux.pdf. Le résumé des communications présentées est disponible sur le site: http://www.cean.cinquantenaire.sciencespobordeaux.fr/resumes_communications.pdf et le texte complet de bon nombre de ces communications (en français, anglais ou portugais est accessible sur le site: http://www.cean.cinquantenaire.sciencespobordeaux.fr/communications.htm.

# Luc Sindjoun (*) a dirigé le numéro special (Volume 18, N°1, 2008) de l'International Review of Sociology publié sous le thème "Culture et Relations Internationales". Dans ce numéro, il signe deux articles: "Prendre la culture au sérieux dans les relations internationales" (pp.39-53) et: "À la recherche de la puissance culturelle dans les relations internationales" (pp. 147-170).

@ Douglas A. Yates (*) has just published a new book titled : “The French Oil Industry and the Corps des Mines in Africa” (Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press, 2008 - $29.95). This is a biographical history of the French oil industry, one of the most important in Africa, told from the perspective of the lives of the men who made it. The book follows a story of the rise of a new breed of state engineers, educated at the prestigious Ecole Polytechnique, who became members of a state administrative elite. This Corps des Mines who founded the national oil champions represent a case study in technocracy, sovereign enterprise, and French administration.It brings together a unique collection of soldier-engineers, black sheep, and financiers whose lives tell the story of an industry that expanded into a veritable empire under the banner of TOTAL.

@ Ghislaine Geloin (*) has contributed a chapter to the volume titled “Movements, Borders, and Identities in Africa” edited by by Toyin Falola & Aribidesi Usman [University of Rochester Press, forthcoming May 2009; 336 p.; $80.00/£ 45.00 - ISBN: 9781580462969].

@ William F.S. Miles (*) has recently published two articles, and a book of his Africanist memoirs: “Legacies of Anglo-French Colonial Borders: A West African and Southeast Asian Comparison,” Journal of Borderland Studies 23 (2008): 83-102; “Islamism in West Africa: Internal Dynamics and U.S. Responses,” The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs 32:2 (2008), pp. 9-13; and “My African Horse Problem” (University of Massachusetts Press,2008);208 pages). Earlier this year, he also published “The Rabbi’s Well: A Case Study in the Micropolitics of Foreign Aid in Muslim West Africa”, in African Studies Review 51:1 (2008), pp. 41-57. The setting for that case study is Niger.

@ Jesse Ribot (*) has joined the faculty of the new School of Earth, Society and Environment at the University of Illinois with an appointment in the Department of Geography. In his new position, he will be launching a new environmental policy research initiative within the University’s Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology [http://www.beckman.uiuc.edu/about/index.aspx]. His new e-mail address is: Ribot@illinois.edu, and his office phone is: (217) 333-7248.

@ Michel Cahen (*) delivered a paper titled: “Lusitanidade and Lusophonie: Conceptual Considerations on Social and Political Realities” for the Workshop on “Diaspora, Empire, and the Making of a Lusophone World” held at Oxford University, 25-26 September 2008.

APPEL À CONTRIBUTION

Colloque “Enseignement et colonisations du XVIIIe siècle à nos jours dans l’empire français – Une histoire connectée?”

(Lyon, 30 septembre, 1er et 2 octobre 2009)

Ce colloque souhaite renouveler la réflexion sur les relations entre enseignement et colonisation en proposant un changement d’échelle : il s’agira d’appréhender la question de l’enseignement dans sa dimension impériale c’est-à-dire d’envisager non seulement les discours et les pratiques dans les différents territoires dominés en les comparant éventuellement, mais aussi d’examiner leurs effets métropolitains et nationaux.

*****

Depuis le début des années 1990, les travaux scientifiques se sont multipliés sur l’enseignement colonial dans les différentes parties de l’Empire français comme sur l’enseignement du fait colonial en France, sans pourtant que ces recherches entrent toujours en résonance les unes avec les autres. Le sujet est doublement sensible. Au premier chef parce que la « mission civilisatrice » dont l’école fut l’un des principaux volets a servi à légitimer – dans les colonies comme en métropole – l’entreprise de conquête et de domination ; également parce que les élèves d’aujourd’hui sont pour partie des descendants des anciennes populations colonisées.

Ce colloque souhaite renouveler la réflexion sur les relations entre enseignement et colonisation en proposant un changement d’échelle : il s’agira d’appréhender la question de l’enseignement dans sa dimension impériale c’est-à-dire d’envisager non seulement les discours et les pratiques dans les différents territoires dominés en les comparant éventuellement, mais aussi d’examiner leurs effets métropolitains et nationaux.

En mettant en relation les connaissances produites sur l’Afrique, l’Indochine, les pays du Maghreb, le Levant, la Nouvelle-Calédonie ou les Antilles on tentera une histoire «connectée» attentive aux circulations (des discours, des programmes, des enseignants, des pratiques pédagogiques, des élèves), aux rencontres et aux transmissions entre les régions colonisées et la métropole, comme entre les régions de l’Empire.

En examinant aussi les mécanismes qui relèvent du fonctionnement de l’institution scolaire d’une façon générale (entreprise de sélection, de formatage des esprits et des corps, de « reproduction » sociale) et les caractéristiques propres à l’enseignement colonial dans les différents territoires sous domination française, on s’interrogera sur les points de convergences et de divergences entre métropole et colonies, sur des situations concrètes d’enseignement et sur les circulations et transmissions qui s’opèrent à l’échelle impériale.

Ce colloque sera organisé sous la forme de deux journées consacrées aux contributions scientifiques, suivies par une journée «formation» à destination des professeurs du second degré sur l’enseignement en situation coloniale et sur l’histoire coloniale. La première journée scientifique sera centrée sur les aspects politiques et culturels du sujet, la seconde mettra l’accent sur une histoire sociale des acteurs de l’enseignement colonial.

Journée 1 : Discours politiques et pratiques d’enseignement en situation coloniale

Un premier axe de réflexion souhaite revenir sur la « mission civilisatrice » sous l’angle de l’assimilation et de «l’adaptation» de l’enseignement au «milieu indigène» tel qu’il est pensé par les colonisateurs, sur la confrontation entre discours et pratiques. Dans le prolongement des travaux de Francine Muel-Dreyfus (1977) à propos de l’école républicaine ou de Fanny Colonna sur l’Algérie (1975) ou d’Alice Conklin (1997), on s’intéressera aux textes politiques, aux programmes et aux pratiques pédagogiques, aux matières « classiques » (langue française, histoire, géographie, sciences) mais aussi à l’ensemble des activités menées dans le cadre scolaire afin de transformer les modes d’être (ethos) des colonisé(e)s : le chant, le sport, les activités artistiques, ménagères, manuelles d’une manière générale. Les textes sur l’enseignement, qu’ils proviennent des missionnaires ou des instances gouvernementales, seront confrontés aux réalisations concrètes, aux dispositifs qui furent mis en place, aux moyens effectivement affectés à l’action et aux résultats obtenus. On reviendra également sur la chronologie de l’enseignement colonial et sur la notion de « système » éducatif pour désigner une politique qui, si elle fut fondée sur un certain nombre de grands principes, se caractérise par les improvisations locales et les distorsions entre la rhétorique des déclarations et les mesures mises en œuvre.

Journée 2 : Pour une histoire sociale de l’enseignement colonial

Un deuxième axe de réflexion souhaite mettre l’accent sur les acteurs et les actrices et sur la «rencontre coloniale» en milieu scolaire. On travaillera sur les parcours et les expériences professionnels et personnels des administrateurs, missionnaires, inspecteurs, enseignant(e)s – qui, pour nombre d’entre eux, ont exercé dans plusieurs régions (à l’échelle nationale et impériale) durant leur carrière – et ont contribué à la circulation des modèles et des pratiques. On réfléchira à leur marge de manœuvre en situation coloniale, à leurs relations avec leurs élèves qui, dans certains cas, se sont prolongées bien après leur départ (pour une autre région ou pour la métropole), à la façon dont ils et elles ont exercé leurs fonctions. On reviendra sur la «mission civilisatrice» et sur le couple « émancipation/coercition» qui la fonde. Les expériences scolaires des colonisé(e)s seront aussi étudiées. Ce colloque voudrait ainsi comparer les phénomènes d’appropriations et de recompositions identitaires provoqués par le passage, plus ou moins long, sur les bancs de l’école française. Des institutions scolaires, des groupes d’élèves, des parcours individuels pourront être analysés, dans la mesure où les acteurs et leurs logiques seront privilégiées.

Les propositions de communication de deux pages au maximum préciseront la méthodologie et les sources utilisées. Elles sont à envoyer avant le 15 décembre 2008 à : enseignement.et.colonies@gmail.com Elles seront accompagnées d’une courte notice biographique mentionnant le rattachement institutionnel et les principales publications dans le champ concerné.

Contact: Emmanuelle Picard – courriel : picard.emmanuelle@orange.fr Rebecca Rogers – courriel : Rebecca.rogers@paris5.sorbonne.fr Pascale Barthélémy – courriel : barthelemypascale@yahoo.fr Pour plus d’information, voir: http://calenda.revues.org/nouvelle11249.html

# Alice Sindzingre(*); a signé un article initulé “Relativiser le poids de l’histoire” à propos des théories du développement dans Le Monde- Économie; du 14 décembre 2007.

(*) Names listed in the GRAF Directory / Noms figurant à l’annuaire du GRAF

Subscriptions to the GRAF Newsletter are $10 per year

(Checks payable to / chèques à l’ordre de : Boston University, African Studies Center/GRAF)

Le prix de l’abonnement annuel au Bulletin du GRAF est de $10

May 2008

May 1st, 2008 in GRAF Newsletters.

@ William F.S. Miles (*) has edited a volume on “Political Islam in West Africa: State-Society Relations Transformed” (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner; 221 p., ISBN 978-1-58826-527-2), to which he contributed the opening chapter (‘West African Islam: Emerging Political Dynamics’), and a concluding section (‘West Africa Transformed: The New Mosque-State Relationship’). Other contributors include Robert Charlick (*), with a chapter on ‘Niger: Islamic Identity and the Politics of Globalization’ and Leonard Villalón (*) writing on ‘Senegal: Shades of Islamism on a Sufi Landscape’.

@ Célestin Monga(*) was invited to deliver the annual Bradford Morse Distinguished Lecture sponsored by the African Studies Center at Boston University. The title of his presentation, given on 22 April, was : “Is Africa Really at a Turning Point? : The Economics and Politics of Hope”. Célestin Monga’s latest book, “Un Bantou à Washington” (Paris:PUF, 2007; 204 pages -ISBN-10: 2130565050 /ISBN-13: 978-2130565055- €14,00)* carries a dust jacket that reads: “From Cameroun’s jails to the World Bank”. Such is indeed the unusual, but not altogether illogical itinerary of a man who, 18 years ago, as an up-and-coming banker in Douala, became an overnight cause célèbre when he was jailed for publishing a scathing open letter to President Paul Biya, the man who has ruled Cameroun for over 25 years and shows no sign of wanting to leave power. A campaign orchestrated by exiled Camerounian writer Mongo Beti eventually led to Monga’s release – and to his departure for the United States where he was affiliated with Harvard University, MIT and Boston University, while simultaneously completing a doctoral degree in France.

Throughout those years, Monga wrote abundantly. His “Anthropologie de la colère” (1995) was translated into English as “The Anthropology of Anger”. “L’argent des autres” was published in 1998, and “Sortir du piège monétaire” (co-authored with J.C. Tchatchouang) in 1999. He also contributed a continous flow of articles, opinion pieces and interviews in the Camerounian press as well as in the diasporic media.

Disillusioned –but not dispirited- by the failure of the democratization process in Cameroun, Monga concentrated on his career as an economist after he was recruited by the World Bank. In 2001, he received the President’s Award for Excellence for his work in Burkina Faso. He subsequently worked on Central Asia and the Baltic states before being promoted to the rank of Lead Economist attached to one of the Bank’s vice-presidents. In May 2006, he was awarded the coveted “Good Practice Award” by the then President of the World Bank, Paul Wolfowitz.

Meanwhile, he has kept his hand in the affairs of his native Cameroun, not only through his writings, but also through his support for the independent Université des Montagnes at Bangangté in the Western part of the country. In April, he wrote a long and impassionate “open letter” to the Camerounian artist Lapiro de Mbanga (aka “Ndinga Man”) whose protest songs, released over a 30-year career, have led to his imprisonment. Monga concludes his letter by quoting Martin Luther King’s words: “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.” (v.:“Lettre ouverte à Lapiro ou le procès du régime Biya” http://www.cameroon-info.net/cmi_show_news.php?id=22470

* “Un Bantou à Washington” is followed by (and derives its title from) “Un Bantou à Djibouti”, a personal notebook written while Monga was working as a banker in that former French enclave some twenty years ago (and long since out of print).

# Alice Sindzingre(*) a signé un article initulé “Relativiser le poids de l’histoire” à propos des théories du développement dans Le Monde- Économie du 14 décembre 2007.

(*) Names listed in the GRAF Directory / Noms figurant à l’annuaire du GRAF

# Boubacar Boris Diop (*), dont le dernier ouvrage “L’Afrique au-delà du miroir” (Paris: Éditions Philippe Rey, 2007; 190 pages -ISBN : 9782848760681-€16,00) s’attache à déconstruire une image du continent noir colportée par les médias, a participé avec 22 autres co-auteurs à la rédaction de “L’Afrique répond à Sarkozy : Contre le discours de Dakar” (Paris: Éditions Philippe Rey, 2008; 478 pages -ISBN-10: 2848761105 / ISBN-13: 978-2848761107- € 19,80).

# Marie-Ange Somdah (*) a été choisi comme chef du département d’Anglais à l’Université de Djibouti et invite les membres du GRAF à le contacter à l’adresse de l’université: Avenue Georges-Clémenceau, Djibouti-Ville, République de Djibouti (ou, par courriel, à l’adresse: msomdah@gmail.com).

@ William F. Miles (*) was a guest speaker in the Spring session of the Walter Rodney Seminar Series (offered since 1979 at Boston University’s African Studies Center) with a lecture titled: “When Ph.D. Meets G.I.: The Format and Ethics of Africanist Consulting for the U.S. Military” Later in the same series, Boubacar Boris Diop (*) gave a talk (“African Intellectuals Respond to Nicolas Sarkozy” ) dealing with the continuing reactions to Nicolas Sarkozy’s controversial ‘Dakar speech’ of July 2007. Two days later, Diop offered another lecture Harvard University on: “La littérature face au génocide des Tutsi du Rwanda”.

@ Theodore Trefon (*) who heads the Contemporary History Section of Belgium’s Royal Museum for Central Africa in Tervuren, in addition to holding visiting appointments at the KUL (Catholic University of Leuven) and at the University of Kinshasa, has taken up the directorship of the Belgian Reference Centre for Expertise for Central Africa/ Centre belge de référence pour l’expertise sur l’Afrique centrale (E-CA — CRE-AC). On 21 & 22 February, the Centre held an inaugural international conference on: “Congo: State, Peace, Economy & Well-Being” at the Egmont Palace in Brussels. E-CA — CRE-AC’s aim is to promote improved access and dissemination of knowledge about central Africa in order to ensure an efficient mobilization of the expertise needed by central Africa for its development. The Centre is a policy-oriented development tool and a catalyst for networking. It is mandated to provide a better understanding of the region by promoting dialogue and the exchange of information between the scientific and academic spheres, NGOs, government and the private sector. Information on E-CA — CRE-AC can be found at http://www.eca-creac.eu/index.php?en-home and the final report of the February conference is available at: http://www.eca-creac.eu/downloads/conference/eca-creac_conference-rapport_final.pdf.

Trefon’s latest publication (co-authored with Balthazar Ngoy) is: “Parcours administratifs dans un Etat en faillite: Récits de Lubumbashi (RDC)” [Tervuren/Paris: Les Cahiers de l’Institut Africain/L’Harmattan, 2007 • 162 pages - ISBN-10: 229-6-03686-4 / ISBN-13: 978-2-296-03686-4 • € 15,00 • Coll.: “Cahiers africains”, nº 74].

Rwanda: littérature et arts graphiques dans la préhistoire d’un génocide”. Par ailleurs, Pierre Halen signe un texte intutulé:“Bwiza ou la beauté: quelques documents sur la fascination tutsie” (pp. 61-88) dans la collection que Jacques Walter et lui ont réuni sous le titre:“Les langages de la mémoire. Littérature, médias et génocide au Rwanda”. Les contributions réunies dans ce volume étudient la manière dont la littérature, les médias, la bande dessinée ou le théâtre ont affronté ces questions, tentant de dire malgré tout quelque chose, et l’essentiel si possible. L’ouvrage est édité par le Centre Écritures, Université Paul Verlaine-Metz. (Littératures des mondes contemporains, série Afriques n° 1, 366 pages • 22,00 €. Pour la table des matières, voir: http://www.univ-metz.fr/recherche/labos/ecritures/collection-lmc/Couverture–TM-Rwanda.pdf.

Dans la même série figure également unouvrage rédigé par Charles Djungu-Simba K. “Les écrivains du Congo-Zaïre. Approches d’un champ littéraire africain” (série Afriques n° 2, 329 pages • 19 €,00 . Table des matières: http://www.univ-metz.fr/recherche/labos/ecritures/collection-lmc/CouvertureTM-Congo-Zaire.pdf.

Pour commander ces ouvrages:

(Frais de port = France: 3€ + 1€ par livre supplémentaire, Etranger: 5€ + 2€ par livre supplémentaire).

@ Milton Krieger (*) has published “Cameroon’s Social Democratic Front: Its History & Prospects as an Opposition Political Party (1990-2001)” (Bamenda: Langaa Research and Publishing, 2008) 115pp., $24.95. The book is distributed by Michigan State University Press in North America, and by ABC (Oxford) in Europe.

@ Daniel Bach (*) contributed a chapter on “The European Union and the African Union” in John Akokpari, Angela Ndinga-Muvumba and Tim Murithi (eds.), The African Union and its institutions, Fanele & CCR: Auckland Park and Cape Town, 2008.

Invitation for contributions to a dossier of the magazine Politique africaine to be published in 2009

Issue coordinated by Luís de Brito

Mozambique after “socialism” and war: a “success story”?

Independent since 1975, Mozambique is today regarded as a “success story“ by donors, for whom examples of efficiency and good results of development aid are rare. Converted to the virtues of the market economy since the second half of the 1980s, after the failure of the “building of socialism”, and emerging in 1992 from a long and destructive civil war, this country, which had become one of the poorest in the world, experienced a very high growth rate and noteworthy political stability over the past decade. But is it really justified to talk of success?

Two major axes are proposed for the attention of authors who wish to contribute to this issue of the magazine, the objective of which is to undertake a critical reflection on the dynamics and processes of transformation under way in Mozambique.

From service economy to aid economy. What “development”?

The colonial economy of Mozambique developed since the end o the 19th century in an atypical fashion: as a supplier of raw materials to the industries of the metropolis and as a protected market for Portuguese exports. At the same time, Mozambique developed very strong economic ties with the countries of the hinterland, particularly with South Africa and Rhodesia. Most of the goods handled by the main ports and railways were in transit to or from these countries. Furthermore, there developed a broad movement of Mozambican migrant labour to these same countries. Equilibrium on the balance of payments was thus guaranteed by the export of labour and by the provision of rail and port services. But this balance was suddenly ruptured with independence, Under the Marxist inspired regime set up by Frelimo, the massive and rapid exodus of the settlers led to the abandonment of many factories and trading and other services, and also to the emptying of the state bureaucracy. At the same time, Frelimo’ solidarity with the liberation movements fighting against the South African and Rhodesian regimes, provoked strong hostility from those regimes, particularly expressed in support for opposition forces, from which Renamo was born as an armed rebel movement.

Faced with these challenges, the economic bankruptcy of the new independent state was practically inevitable. Neither the independence of Zimbabwe in 1980, nor the Nkomati Accord, signed with South Africa in 1984 led to the end of the armed conflict with Renamo or prevented the decline of the economy. Due to the war, which spread to all provinces n the country as from 1983, the economic liberalisation carried out under the aegis of the IMF and the World Bank produced few results until the second half of the 1990s. The peace re-established in 1992 allowed the take-off of the economy, sustained by massive reconstruction aid and later by some major industrial investments, which had a noteworthy impact on the indicators for two digit economic growth, but which created only a few thousand jobs, and very little tax revenue for the state. The state budget remained dependent on foreign aid for over 50% of its expenditure.

It was in this period that the formation of a national bourgeoisie picked up pace, benefiting, directly or indirectly from the privatisation, from opportunities for mediation/alliance with foreign investors, and sharing with staff and employees of the NGOs most of the benefits from international handouts. “Poverty” has become an excellent “export product” which in itself justifies the continuation of foreign aid.

The benefits of economic growth do not reach most Mozambicans. Broad sectors of rural society and of the urban strata are suffering a real loss of income, and are in a situation of great vulnerability faced with inflation, particularly the increase in food and transport prices. Faced with a state that promises everything but does little for the mass of the people, indifference begins to give way to expressions of violent revolt, similar to the “bread riots” known from other African countries. This poses the question of the relationship between citizens and state power, and with democracy.

The difficult construction of democracy

In the political sphere, the successes seem still more modest than in the economic field. Frelimo has managed to remain in power through winning all the presidential elections (even though there are doubts about the 1999 results) and by obtaining absolute majorities in parliament, but it has not proved capable of making a clean break with the tradition of the one party state. The clear political legitimacy of Renamo, expressed since 1994 in the vote of millions of Mozambicans is still systematically denied by Frelimo, which continues to refer to its origins and past links with the racist regimes of Rhodesia and South Africa. Under these conditions, elections organised under Frelimo control without great transparency have been losing importance in the eyes of a growing number of voters. Indeed, after the great mobilisation aroused by the first multi-party elections (with an 87% turnout), the renewal of political life that was expected from instituting a competitive political system did not occur, and the following elections showed the disillusion of the electorate with the abstention rate growing from 33% in 1999 to about 50% in 2004.

Another political reform, decentralisation, also aroused great expectations. But the decentralisation policy sketched in the 1990 Constitution, based on local elections in the districts was abandoned, after the results of the first general elections showed that the opposition might win control of a significant number of district governments, and it was replaced by a model of municipalisation limited to33 cities and towns. This municipalisation should gradually reach new places, but ten years after the first municipal elections, the government has decided to create only ten new municipalities for the next elections. This was the terrain on which the country experienced its first change in political power, because Renamo candidates were elected as mayors in five municipalities (including Beira, the country’s second largest city) and a majority in the municipal assemblies in four of these cities and towns. However, the value of this democraticexercise was affected by the poor voter turnout (an average of 23% for the 33 municipalities taken together), Under these conditions, those elected cannot be considered to have acquired great legitimacy.

To a weak system of political representation, we can add an equally weak civil society. The trade unions set up during the period of the one party state remain mostly linked to Frelimo. Furthermore, the economic and political context is not favourable for worker mobilisation, given that workers face a high rate of unemployment and are concerned above all not to lose their jobs. Although there are a large number of other non-governmental organisations in Mozambique, these were mostly set up thanks to the availability of funds from international aid, and play a role as instruments for the redistribution of this income. With some rare exceptions, they do not contribute towards expanding the democratic space.

The two thematic lines proposed here in a synthetic and provocative manner do not prevent authors from submitting draft articles on other themes.

The drafts should be sent by 30 June 2008 to luis.brito@iese.ac.mz . The final versions should be submitted by 30 November 2008.

@ Robert Kappel (*) and Esther K. Ishengoma have co-authored “Business Constraints and Growth Potential of Micro and Small Manufacturing Enterprises in Uganda” published in May 2008 by the German Institute of Global and Area (GIGA) in Hamburg as nº 78 in their series of working papers. Observing that Ugandan micro- and small enterprises (MSEs) still perform poorly, the paper utilizes data collected in Uganda in March and April 2003 to analyze the business constraints faced by these MSEs. Using a stratified random sampling, a sample of 265 MSEs were interviewed. The study focuses on the 105 manufacturing firms that responded to all questions. It examines the extent to which the growth of MSEs is associated with business constraints, while also controlling for owners’ attributes and firms’ characteristics. The results reveal that MSEs’ growth potential is negatively affected by limited access to productive resources (finance and business services), by high taxes, and by lack of market access.

@ Andreas Mehler (*), Ulf Engel (*), Lena Giesbert, Jenny Kuhlmann and Christian von Soest have published another working paper in that same series (nº 75) titled: “Structural Stability: On the Prerequisites of Nonviolent Conflict Management” (April 2008). The concept of “structural stability” has been gaining prominence in development policy circles. It refers to the ability of societies to handle intra-societal conflict without resorting to violence. This study investigates the preconditions of structural stability and tests their mutual interconnections. Seven dimensions are analyzed: (1) long-term economic growth, (2) environmental security, (3) social equality, (4) governmental effectiveness, (5) democracy, (6) rule of law, and (7) inclusion of identity groups. The postulated mutual enhancement of the seven dimensions is plausible but cannot be proven. The most significant positive relationship appears between “democracy” and “rule of law,” respectively, on the one hand and the dependent variable “violence/ human security” on the other hand. This points to the usefulness of the political concept of structural stability to promote development policy agendas in this area at least. Applications that reach beyond these initial findings will, however, require further research.

All GIGA Working Papers are available free of charge at: www.giga-hamburg.de/workingpapers.

Mapping Integration and Regionalism in a Global World: The EU and regional governance outside the EU

GARNET/ Sciences Po Bordeaux/ Centre for International Governance and Innovation Conference

3rd Annual Meeting of the GARNET network

Sciences Po Bordeaux, University of Bordeaux , 17-19 September 2008

GARNET: www.garnet-eu.org; Sciences Po Bordeaux: http://www.sciencespobordeaux.fr; CIGI: http://www.cigionline.org/.

Crossing Cultures Senegal 2008

Crossing Cultures offers a stimulating travel and educational program focused on the French-speaking Republic of Senegal, West Africa. The program dates for the 2008 Crossing Cultures program are June 23 –July 8. It will be ID’s 19th program to Senegal.

Led by two former Peace Corps volunteers, this well-established program appeals to people in and out of academia. It works well for those who want to experience family life and community projects in the rural areas of this diverse nation, and for those with special interests in dance and music training, environment, government, agriculture, language or education and health projects.

The Crossing Cultures group is small, no more than five, allowing the leaders to tailor activities to the participants’ interests. Reasonable cost. Extended stays for volunteer work or field study can be facilitated. For more information, contact: Janet L. Ghattas, General Director.

Intercultural Dimensions, Inc. PO Box 391437, Cambridge MA 02139 USA

Voice: 617 864 8442

E-mail: janet.ghattas@gmail.com

Website: www.interculturaldimensions.org

Intercultural Dimensions, Inc. is a tax-exempt 501(C)(3) educational organization.

# Le nouveau service “France 24” (L’actualité internationale 24h/24) comporte une section “Afrique” que l’on peut visiter sur le site: http://www.france24.com/france24Public/fr/nouvelles/afrique.html

(NB: versions anglaise et arabe disponibles)

(*) Names listed in the GRAF Directory / Noms figurant à l’annuaire du GRAF

Subscriptions to the GRAF Newsletter are $10 per year

(Checks payable to / chèques à l’ordre de : Boston University, African Studies Center/GRAF)

Le prix de l’abonnement annuel au Bulletin du GRAF est de $10

October 2007

October 1st, 2007 in GRAF Newsletters.

# Achille Mbembe (*) a participé, sous la forme d’un entretien intitulé: “Décoloniser les structures psychiques du pouvoir”, à la réalisation du numéro 51 de la revue “Mouvements” (septembre 2007) dont le thème était: “Qui a peur du postcolonial?” [Paris: Editions ‘La Découverte’; 176 pages;15 € -ISBN : 978-2-7071-5274-9]. Par ailleurs, il a pris une part très active au débat suscité par le discours très polémique prononcé le 26 juillet à Dakar par Nicolas Sarkozy. Sa première réaction a été un texte daté du 1er août et intitulé: “L’Afrique de Nicolas Sarkozy” (disponible sur:http://www.ldh-toulon.net/spip.php?article2183) * Quelques jours plus tard, il a publié “France-Afrique: ces sottises qui divisent” (http://www.ldh-toulon.net/spip.php?article2200) puis, à la suite d’un bref séjour en France où il avait participé, entre autres, à un colloque sur le thème: «La France et l’Afrique: rupture ou régression ?» il a livré ses “Impressions de Paris”, parmi lesquelles il note, à propos de son intervention dans le colloque: “Après avoir fait valoir que le rapport entre l’Afrique et la France devait être repensé dans le cadre plus large d’une véritable politique africaine du monde, j’ai plaidé en faveur d’un paradigme minimaliste. Ce dernier reposerait sur deux principes. Le premier est que l’Afrique ne doit rien attendre de la France. En retour, que la France s’abstienne (…) au maximum d’exercer chez nous la sorte de «pouvoir de nuisance» qu’elle n’a cessé de manifester depuis la fin des colonisations directes. Le deuxième principe est que par rapport à la France comme d’ailleurs dans les rapports avec le reste du monde, les Africains s’efforcent de cultiver l’autonomie morale. Sans cette indépendance morale, ils seront toujours exposés à la corruption et leur liberté de jugement et d’action sera toujours hypothéquée”. Ce texte (http://www.ldh-toulon.net/spip.php?article2245) a été reproduit sur le blog d’Alain Mabanckou que Mbembe a recontré pour la première fois pendant son voyage à Paris: http://www.congopage.com/article4939.html.

* English version on this website: http://www.africultures.com/index.asp?menu=revue_affiche_article&no=6816&lang=_en.

# Boubacar Boris Diop (*) est l’un des nombreux intellectuels (africains et occidentaux) qui ont réagi avec force au discours de Nicolas Sarkozy, avec un texte intitulé: “Le discours inacceptable de Nicolas Sarkozy”, posté le 13 août sur le site: http://www.rewmi.com/Le-discours-inacceptable-de-Nicolas-Sarkozy,-par-Boubacar-Boris-Diop_a3409.html.

Il en va de même pour Mamadou Diouf (*) dans un entretien publié le 17 Août dans Sud Quotidien (Dakar) sous le titre: “Pourquoi Sarkozy se donne-t-il le droit de nous tancer et de juger nos pratiques?” et dont on trouvera le texte sur le site: http://www.ldh-toulon.net/spip.php?article2212.

Dans un article publié le 8 août dans le quotidien camerounais Le Messager, Jean-François Bayart (*) se se dit «stupéfait» par le discours de Nicolas Sarkozy. Cette intervention, intitulée «Y a pas rupture, patron!» est reproduite sur le site: http://www.ldh-toulon.net/spip.php?article2197.

Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch (*), Gilles Manceron et Benjamin Stora ont, pour leur part publié le 13 août dans Libération un article intitulé: “La mémoire partisane du président” dont on peut retrouver le texte sur le site: http://www.ldh-toulon.net/spip.php?article2206.

De très nombreuses autres réactions au discours de Dakar sont affichées sur le site de la section de Toulon de la Ligue des Droits de l’Homme dans une rubrique accessible à l’adresse: http://www.ldhtoulon.net/spip.php?rubrique131. On trouvera par ailleurs sur leur site http://www.ldh-toulon.net/ d’autres sujets repris sous la rubrique “Histoire et colonies” (http://www.ldh-toulon.net/spip.php?rubrique20).

# Guy Rossatanga-Rignault (*) vient de publier un ouvrage intitulé: “Le travail du Blanc ne finit jamais. L’Africain, le temps et le travail moderne” (Libreville :Editions Raponda-Walker-Dianoïa, 2007, 94 pages, 15 € ) Guy Rossatanga-Rignault s’interroge sur les rapports des Africains à l’entreprise et au travail. Après avoir réglé leur compte à des clichés tenaces sur l’indolence supposée des Noirs, il articule sa réflexion autour d’un dicton gabonais : «Le travail des Blancs ne finit jamais.» L’analyse porte donc sur la vision africaine, où se révèlent des logiques temporelles particulières. Mais le malentendu sur le rapport au travail tient aussi à la manière dont le monde économique des Blancs s’est imposé au continent noir.

# Samba Gadjigo (*), le biographe d’Ousmane Sembène, est l’auteur du nouveau livre “Ousmane Sembène: une conscience africaine” (Paris: Homnisphères,2007, Coll. “Latitudes noires”; 254 pp. € 17,00 ISBN-10: 291512924X et ISBN-13: 978-2915129243). Il a aussi été au centre des nombreuses commémorations qui ont eu lieu aux États-Unis pour honorer le défunt écrivain et cinéaste sénégalais décédé en juin dernier à Dakar. C’est ainsi qu’il a présidé la séance d’ouverture d’une rétrospective des films de Sembène au Harvard Film Archive les 7-9 septembre avant de donner, le 15 octobre, une conference dans le cadre du Walter Rodney Seminar Series à l’African Studies Center de Boston University. À cette occasion, l’assistance a pu visionner le documentaire intitulé: “The making of Ousmane Sembene’s Moolaade” qu’il a réalisé lors du tournage de cette dernière œuvre de ‘’l’aîné des anciens”, comme il aimait s’appeler lui-même. Sitôt après, du 17 au 21 octobre, c’est Brown University, située à Providence (Rhode Island), qui a tenu un colloque auquel il a participé, en même temps que les cinéastes Jean-Marie Teno du Cameroun, Sylvestre Amoussou du Bénin et Flora Gomes de la Guinée Bissau. Lors de cette rencontre, Samba Gadjigo a rappelé cette phrase qui était chère à Sembène: ”l’homme est culture; sans elle, les individus sont transformés en tubes digestifs”. ”L’art est le seul moyen de représenter l’homme et qu’il est une nécessité vivante pour l’être humain”, a-t-il poursuivi. Le dernier message que Samba Gadjigo a adressé à Brown University au nom de Sembène est qu’ ”au 21ème siècle tout peuple qui ne contrôle pas son image est appelé à disparaître”. Cet intérêt pour Ousmane Sembène n’est pas passé inaperçu au Sénégal, où il a été commenté dans les media –notamment sur http://www.seneweb.com/.

@ Indiana University Press has just published a paperback edition of“Griots and Griottes – Masters of Words and Music” by Thomas A. Hale (*) [432 pages, photos, maps, $24.95; ISBN-13: 978-0-253-21961-9]. Originally published in 1998 (and still available in a hardback edition), the book tells the story of these remarkable wordsmiths and performers, and addresses the nature of their verbal and musical art, the role of female griots, or griottes, how griots and griottes fit into their societies, and what their future might be in Africa and the rest of the world.

@ Tony Chafer (*) has published an article entitled “Education and political socialisation of a national-colonial political elite in French West Africa, 1936-1947” in the Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, vol. 35 (3), September 2007; pp. 437-458.

# François Ibara (*) a participé, du 28 au 30 août, à deux ateliers de validation, le premier, sur le document final de réduction de la pauvreté (DSRP).Ses objectifs: promouvoir une croissance saine et durable,améliorer le bien être des populations par l’atteinte des objectifs du millénaire pour le développement (OMD). Le second, pour l’atteinte des OMD sur le plan national. Son objectif: créer des partenariats plus solides afin d’accelérer le rythme du développement et d’en mesurer les résultats.

# Luc Sindjoun (*) a publié dans la Revue Canadienne de Science Politique, Volume 40, N°2, juin 2007 (pp. 465-485), un article intitulé “Les pratiques sociales dans les régimes politiques africains en voie de démocratisation: hypothèses théoriques et empiriques sur la paraconstitution”. Par ailleurs, il a été désigné par le Conseil Africain et Malgache de l’Enseignement Supérieur comme président du jury du concours africain d’agrégation de droit public et de science politique qui se déroulera du 5 au 13 novembre à Libreville (Gabon).

# Célestin Monga (*) vient de publier: “Un Bantou à Washington” [Paris:PUF, 2007; Coll.: Perspectives critiques; 208 pages, 14 Euros - ISBN-10: 2130565050 / ISBN-13: 978-2130565055] L’ouvrage retrace le parcours de Monga “des geôles camerounaises à la Banque Mondiale” (selon le bandeau de couverture imaginé par l’éditeur) et il est suivi de “Un Bantou à Djibouti”, l’un des tout premiers textes de Monga, écrit il y a vingt ans mais devenu introuvable et qui se voit ainsi republié. D’autre part, Célestin Monga a participé (en tant qu’Associate Editor pour les sujets économiques) à la “New Encyclopedia of Africa”, dirigée par John Middleton (Farmington Hills, MI: Gale/Cengage Learning; 2nd ed. 2007; 5 vol.; $575.00 -ISBN-10: 0684314541/ISBN-13: 978-0684314549) et qui constitue une nouvelle édition de l’“Encyclopedia of Africa South of the Sahara” publiée en 1997 par Charles Scribner & Sons, maison d’édition depuis lors absorbée par le groupe Cengage Learning).

@ John F. Clark (*) has contributed an article titled “The Decline of the African Military Coup” to the Journal of Democracy, vol. 17, no.3 (July 2007), pp. 141-155.

@ Claude Sumata (*) presented a paper on “Governance and Mining” on a panel devoted to Mining, Regulation & the State during the conference on “The State, Mining and Development in Africa” held 13 &14 September 2007 at the University of Leeds, and organized by Leeds University Centre for African Studies & The Review of African Political Economy.

# Le volume XV de la “Bibliografia general de Guinea Ecuatorial”, post-ultime selon l’introduction, vient d’être publié à Genève par les soins des Éditions du Temps. Cette série, réalisée sous la direction de Max Liniger-Goumaz (*), atteint quasiment 59 700 références. L’ancienne colonie espagnole est le seul pays d’Afrique à disposer d’un instrument d’une telle envergure. Pour les commandes, s’adresser à: Éditions du Temps, 1308 La Chaux, Suisse.

@ Andreas Eckert (*) has published an article titled “Useful Instruments of Participation? Local Government and Cooperatives in Tanzania, 1940s to 1970s” in the International Journal of African Historical Studies, Volume 40, Number 1, (2007), pp.97-118.

(*) Names listed in the GRAF Directory / Noms figurant l’annuaire du GRAF

GRAF members at the 50th annual meeting of the African Studies Association

@ Pearl T. Robinson (*), the outgoing president of the African Studies Association (ASA) delivered the annual presidential lecture on October 19, during the 50th annual meeting of the ASA in New York. The title of her address was: “Ralph Bunche the Africanist”.

@ Jesse Ribot (*) chaired a panel on “Wealth and Destitution: Distributional Equity and Forestry Policy in Senegal”, to which he also contributed a paper titled: “Weex Dunx and the Quota: Coercing Rural Councilors for Forest Access in Senegal”.

@ Pierre Englebert (*) headed a panel titled: “Transitioning from War to Peace in the Great Lakes Region: Burundi and the DR Congo After the Elections”. He also delivered a paper on “Beyond Sovereignty Fetishism: Rational Policy Fantasies for Africa’s Failed States” on the panel devoted to: “Rethinking and Redefining African Governance: Alternative Structures and Understandings of Sovereignty and Collective Action”.

@ Thomas Hale (*) contributed a paper titled: “African Language Rights and Francophonie in Francophone Africa: A Replacement for le Symbole or Another Symbolic Gesture?” on the panel “Excavating African Voices: Agency, Subjectivity”.

@ Bennetta Jules-Rosette (*) presented, with Wayne Osborn (UCSD),a paper titled: “ Unmixing the Chaos: African and Diasporic Art on Display in Global Context” on the 2nd of three panels devoted to the “(Im)possibilities of Representing Cultural Production in Postcolonial Africa” and Christraud Geary(*) delivered, for the same panel a paper “On the Global Stage: Self-Representation and Re-Invention in the Bamum Kingdom, Cameroon”.

@ The third panel on that same theme was chaired by Bogumil Jewsiewicki (*), who also contributed a paper titled: “Making Museums for the People? Two Joint Projects in the Congo and Haiti”.

@ Jennifer Widner (*) presented a paper on “Constitution Writing & Protections Against Executive Abuse of Power in Africa” on the panel devoted to “Constitution Writing and Constitutionalism in Africa: Assessing the Latest Wave”, which she also chaired.

@ William Miles (*) headed a roundtable on “Border Spaces and Borderlands: Actors, Research, Prospects”.

@ John F. Clark (*) contributed a paper on “The Congo War as an International Event” for the panel devoted to “Explaining Africa’s International Conflicts”.

@ Catherine Boone (*) headed the panel on “Political Competition and Political Economy in Rural Africa”, and contributed a paper titled: “The Rwandan Genocide as a Land-Related Conflict: The Political Geography of Incentives and Mobilization”.

@ Jerry Domatob (*) presented a paper on: “Media, Culture & Human Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa” for the panel on: “Communication, Culture & Human Rights in 21st Century Africa”.

@ Stephen Jackson (*) delivered a paper titled: “Congolité – Elections and the Politics of Authenticity in the DR Congo” to the panel on “Autochthony, Land Rights and Conflict in West and Central Africa”.

@ Valerie Orlando (*) offered a paper titled: “TelQuel: Le Maroc tel qu’il est: Opening the Doors of Democracy through the Francophone Press of the ‘New Morocco’” on the panel devoted to: “Democratic Openings, the Press, and Politics”.

@ Simon Akindes (*) participated in a roundtable devoted to: “Debating Diaspora and Global Africa’s Development”.

@ Nicolas van de Walle (*) served as discussant on the panel sponsored by the African Politics Conference Group, and titled: “A Closer Look at Patronage Politics: Redistributive Politics and Elections in Africa”.

@ Adeline Masquelier (*) delivered a paper titled: “Negotiating Futures: Islam, Youth, and Modernity in Niger” to the panel on: “Religion, Identity, Political Engagement, and Rights in Africa”.

@ Hudita Mustafa (*) chaired the panel titled: “Claiming the City: Topographies, Imaginaries and Networks in Muslim West Africa”, to which he also contributed a paper on: “The Public, Commercial and Sacred in Dakar’s Cityscape”.

@ Scott Youngstedt (*) presented a paper titled: “Contesting Human Rights: Views from Niger” in the panel “Social and Economic Rights in Africa: Contemporary Challenges and Assertions”.

@ Kassim Kone (*) contributed a paper titled: “The Encounter of Islam and the Bamana Kòmò: ‘Kòmòization’ of Islam or Islamization of the Kòmò?” to the panel on: “Art, Islam, and Cultural Practices in the Mande Senufo Hinterlands”, sponsored by the Mande Studies Association.

@ Stephen Reyna (*) delivered a paper titled: “Muddles in the ‘Model’ Model: Oil, Conflict, and the World Bank in Chad” for the panel devoted to: “Traveling Models in Conflict Management: Perspectives from Africa”.

@ Yvette Djachechi (*) collaborated with Ralph Austen in a paper titled: “From Slavery to Elite Status: the Archives and Writings of the Mandessi Bell family”, which was presented on the panel “African Sources on Slavery and Emancipation” sponsored by the Association for the Publication of African Historical Sources.

@ Bogumil Jewsiewicki (*) will appear as commentator in a session on “The re-emergence of the memory of slavery and slave trade” chaired by Myriam Cottias (Université des Antilles et Guyane, CNRS, France), as part of the workshop titled: “Living history: Encountering the memory of the heirs of slavery” to be held during the 122nd meeting of the American Historical Association scheduled to take place in Washington D.C on 3 – 6 January 2008. That workshop is being co-sponsored by the Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on the Global Migrations of African Peoples (York University) and by the Chaire de recherche du Canada en histoire comparée de la mémoire, (Université Laval) held by Bogumil Jewsiewicki. Participants in the session include Ibrahima Thioub and Ibrahima Seck -both from Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD) of Dakar, Senegal, Benigna Zimba (Universidade Eduardo Mondlane, Mozambique) and Christine Chivallon (CNRS, France).

Call for papers for Africana Linguistica, n°XIV (2008)

Authors are invited to submit original research contributions before February 1, 2008.

Africana Linguistica is a journal dedicated to the study of African languages with special focus on Bantu. The journal welcomes original descriptive, historical and typological papers in phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicology and semantics. Contributions on poorly documented and described languages or lesser known language areas as well as those trying to integrate linguistics into interdisciplinary approaches of the African past are highly appreciated. Fellow researchers from Africa are especially encouraged to contribute.

Africana Linguistica is a peer-reviewed and internationally oriented journal. In harmony with the editorial policy of the RMCA, all contributions are submitted to at least two anonymous peer-reviewers. The editorial team is reinforced by a national committee of associate editors, affiliated to several Belgian universities, and an international editorial board of renowned experts in African linguistics.

Africana Linguistica accepts papers in English and French. Authors are requested to strictly follow the guidelines specified in the journal’s stylesheet (see website). Contributions should be submitted before February 1st to be considered for publication in the same year, both electronically in rtf-format and preferably also in pdf-format to : <africana.linguistica@africamuseum.be> and in hard copy to : Africana Linguistica, RMCA, Leuvensesteenweg 13, 3080 Tervuren, Belgium.

#Appel à contribution pour Africana Linguistica, n°XIV (2008)

Les auteurs sont invités à soumettre des articles de recherche originale avant le 1e février 2008.

Africana Linguistica est un périodique axé sur l’étude des langues africaines, sans exclusive, mais avec un intérêt particulier pour les langues bantu et celles des groupes linguistiques qui leurs sont apparentés. Les contributions originales, tant en linguistique descriptive qu’en linguistique historique et typologique, sur des aspects aussi divers que la phonétique/phonologie, la morphologie, la syntaxe, la lexicologie et la sémantique, sont les bienvenues. Celles qui portent sur des langues peu documentées, sont tout particulièrement appréciées ainsi que celles qui cherchent à intégrer la linguistique dans des approches interdisciplinaires de l’histoire africaine. Nos collègues d’Afrique sont vivement encouragés à soumettre leurs travaux.

Africana Linguistica se veut un journal d’envergure internationale avec procédure de peer-review. Conformément à la politique éditoriale du MRAC, chaque contribution est soumise anonymement à deux experts extérieurs. L’équipe rédactionnelle est soutenue par un comité d’éditeurs associés, issus de diverses universités belges, ainsi que par un comité scientifique international composé de linguistes africanistes de renom.

Les contributions peuvent être soumises en anglais ou en français. Les auteurs sont priés de respecter scrupuleusement les recommandations de mise en forme (voir site web). En cas d’acceptation, les articles soumis avant le 1 février de chaque année seront publiés dans le courant de la même année. Ils peuvent nous être adressés, tant par courrier électronique (formats rtf et de préférence aussi pdf) à l’adresse <africana.linguistica@africamuseum.be> que par la poste, en version papier, à l’adresse: Africana Linguistica, MRAC, Leuvensesteenweg 13, 3080 Tervuren, Belgique.

More info / Plus d’infos: http://www.africamuseum.be/publications/journals/AfricanaLinguistica

Koen Bostoen, Baudouin Janssens & Jacky Maniacky (éditeurs) – Muriel Garsou (assistante de rédaction)

# Le nouveau service “France 24” (L’actualité internationale 24h/24) comporte une section “Afrique” que l’on peut visiter sur le site: http://www.france24.com/france24Public/fr/nouvelles/afrique.html (NB: versions anglaise et arabe disponibles).

(*) Names listed in the GRAF Directory / Noms figurant à l’annuaire du GRAF

Subscriptions to the GRAF Newsletter are $10 per year

(Checks payable to / chèques à l’ordre de : Boston University, African Studies Center/GRAF)

Le prix de l’abonnement annuel au Bulletin du GRAF est de $10

June 2007

June 1st, 2007 in GRAF Newsletters.

@ Catherine Boone (*), Professor of Government at University of Texas at Austin and past Treasurer and 2005-2006 President of the West African Research Association (WARA, at http://www.africa.ufl.edu/WARA/), received an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) research fellowship for 2006-2007 for research on land-related conflict and electoral politics in sub-Saharan Africa. She published “Africa’s New Territorial Politics: Regionalism and the Open Economy in Côte d’Ivoire,” African Studies Review, 50/1 (April 2007): 59-81. In today’s ‘open economy’, she argues, the forms of national integration achieved during the era of state-led development are difficult to sustain. The new territorial politics that has emerged in their place involves consolidating power within sub-units of the state, reordering relations among them, enforcing political control within communities and restructuring rural property rights.

@ René Lemarchand (*) was invited to give a public lecture at Manhattan College (NY) on “The Rwanda Genocide and the Politics of Memory”, and another at the London School of Economics on February 19. Earlier, he had presented a paper on “Genocide, Memory and Ethnic Reconciliation” at the Cardoso Law Center on November 4, and served as discussant at the conference on “Pratiques de sauvetage en situations génocidaires” organized by the Institut d’Etudes Politiques (IEP-Paris) in December. His report to the Swiss Peace Foundation on “Burundi’s Endangered Transition” appeared in November 2006. His article on “Consociationalism and Power Sharing in Africa: Rwanda, Burundi and the Democratic Republic of the Congo” appeared in African Affairs, 106/422 (January 2007), pp. 1-20.

# L’entretien d‘Achille Mbembe (*) avec Célestin Monga (*) sur le thème: “Comment penser l’Afrique ? De la famille africaine, des artistes, des intellectuels, de la critique et des évolutions de la creation” (publié à l’origine le 4 mai 2006 dans Le Messager, quotidien paraissant à Douala) est accessible sur le site d’Africulture à l’adresse: http://www.africultures.com/index.asp?menu=affiche_article&no=4406

@ Fallou Ngom (*), who will be joining the faculty of the African Studies Center at Boston University, has published his study of Lexical Borrowings as Sociolinguistic Variables in the series Studies in Sociolinguistics (Munich: Lincoln Europa Academic Publishers, 2006; 198 pp. ISBN: 389 5863548). His paper on Loan Words in the Senegalese Speech Community: Their linguistic features and sociolinguistic significance appeared in Language and Communication, Tome 1 (2006), pp.103-113. He also presented a paper titled: Popular Culture in Senegal: Blending the secular and the religious at the conference on Popular Culture in Africa held on March 30-April 1 at the University of Texas at Austin.

@ Douglas A. Yates (*) contributed a chapter on “Chinese Oil Interests in Africa” (pp. 219-237) to the volume edited by Garth le Pere: “China in Africa: Mercantilist predator, or partner in development?” (Midrand, South Africa : Institute for Global Dialogue / Johannesburg: South African Institute of International Affairs, 2007; 287 pp. – ISBN:1919697969,h). He also published an article titled: “The Scramble for African Oil” in The South African Journal of International Affairs issue devoted to “China in Africa” (Vol. 13.1:Summer/Autumn 2006). In addition to his other teaching commitments, Yates, who is now on the faculty of the American Graduate School of International Relations & Diplomacy (ASGIRD) based in the Alliance Française Building, 101 boulevard Raspail, in Paris, has been instrumental in convening a three-day session of the International Political Science Association’s (IPSA) Research Committee #49 on “Socialism, Capitalism, and Democracy”. The meeting, titled “Empires: Cultural, Political, Economic” is being held July 11-13 in the ASGIRD building. The conference program can be accessed at: http://www.agsird.edu/IPSAConference-DetailedSchedule.htm.

Meanwhile, Douglas Yates has been taking part in some of the debates organized by the new 24/7 French news channel “France 24” (also on the Web at http://www.france24.com/france24Public/fr/nouvelles/monde.html). On 17 April, he joined a debate on “Port d’armes : l’exception américaine” and, on June 28, he joined in a roundtable discussion titled “Distrusting the USA”. These programs can be watched at the following URLs: http://www.france24.com/france24Public/fr/archives/debata/2007/Avril/ 20070417-Debat-port-arme-exception-americaine.html http://www.france24.com/france24Public/en/archives/talk/20070628-Debate-usa-france-distrusting.html.

@ Timothy W. Docking (*) continues, until further notice, to work at the Millennium Challenge Corporation as a senior adviser to the MCC’s CEO. In May, his work took him on a 2-week trip to St. Petersburg, Russia, and to Armenia and Georgia.

@ John F. Clark (*) has contributed an article titled “The Decline of the African Military Coup” to the Journal of Democracy, vol. 17, no.3 (July 2007), pp. 141-155.

@ Claude Sumata (*) will present a paper on “Governance and Mining” on a panel devoted to Mining, Regulation & the State during the conference on “The State, Mining and Development in Africa” to be held 13 &14 September 2007 at the University of Leeds, and organized by Leeds University Centre for African Studies & The Review of African Political Economy.

(*) Names listed in the GRAF Directory / Noms figurant l’annuaire du GRAF

CALL FOR PAPERS FEEGI

We invite paper proposals for the biennial conference of The Forum on European Expansion and Global Interaction (FEEGI) to be held at Georgetown University, Washington, DC on February 22-23, 2008. FEEGI, an AHA affiliate, is an international organization of scholars dedicated to encouraging scholarship and collaboration across the boundaries of national histories and disciplinary frameworks. To facilitate this, all sessions at FEEGI meetings are usually plenary.

For the 2008 conference, work that engages the theme of “empire and identity” is especially encouraged. We will consider individual proposals on any theme in the fields of European expansion or global interaction during the early modern period, broadly defined as the fourteenth century to the middle of the nineteenth century. Panels are welcome, but may be re-organized to fit a larger program organized thematically in order to encourage comparative thinking outside the bounds of regional histories. FEEGI will provide partial subsidy to a limited number of graduate student presenters.

Proposals should include a 250-word abstract of the paper and an abbreviated c.v. Electronic submissions are preferred, and attachments should be in MS Word .doc format. Those who prefer a hard-copy submission must provide four (4) copies of the abstract and c.v. Proposals must be received by 15 August 2007.

Paper proposals should be sent as an email attachment to Prof. Marjoleine Kars, < kars@umbc.edu > or to: Dept. of History: 713 Administration Building, Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250.
For more information about FEEGI, including programs from past conferences, visit our website at http://feegi.org.

@ Andreas Eckert (*) has published an article titled “Useful Instruments of Participation? Local Government and Cooperatives in Tanzania, 1940s to 1970s” in the International Journal of African Historical Studies, Volume 40, Number 1, (2007), pp.97-118

EXPRESSIONS OF TRADITIONAL WISDOM

INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM
Brussels, Thursday 27 – Friday 28 SEPTEMBER 2007

The Royal Academy for Overseas Sciences, in collaboration with the Royal Museum for Central Africa and the Royal Museums of Art and History, is organizing an international symposium devoted to “Expressions of Traditional Wisdom” of cultures from “overseas”, i.e., Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Americas including the ancient civilizations of these continents.

The notion of “wisdom” in the sense of practical wisdom has entered Western civilization through biblical texts. In the Hellenic experience this kind of wisdom received a more structural character in the form of philosophy. In this sense philosophy also reflects one of the expressions of traditional wisdom.

The following themes have been retained: Expressions of Traditional Wisdom in:

1. Religion
2. Philosophy
3. Gender Studies
4. The Afterlife
5. Family Life
6. Justice
7. Education
8. Power/Authority Politics
9. Contemporary Literature
10. Material Culture
11. Linguistics
12. Health

For information: Prof. Dr Danielle Swinne, Permanent Secretary, Royal Academy for Overseas Sciences
rue Defacqz 1/3 B- 1000 Brussels, Belgium
Tel.: (0032) 2 538 02 11 – Fax: (0032) 2 539 23 53 – E-mail: kaowarsom@skynet.be

# Christopher Fomunyoh (*) a pris part, en tant que directeur de la région “Afrique” du National Democratic Institute (NDI), à l’observation des elections nigérianes. A cette occasion, il a séjourné au Cameroun, son pays natal, où il a reçu le titre de Sou Foo dans une chefferie supérieure à Dschang, dans l’Ouest du pays. Il s’est également prêté à un long entretien avec le journaliste Alain B. Batongué. Cette interview a été publiée dans l’édition du 16 mai du journal Mutations, qui paraît à Yaoundé. Le texte de cet entretien est disponible sur demande adressée au GRAF.

Achille Mbembe (*) will participate in the 4th annual Seminar in Experimental Critical Theory (SECT), an intensive two-week summer program offered by the University of California Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI) on the campus of the University of California at Irvine August 6-17, 2007. Neither an introductory survey nor an advanced research seminar, SECT functions as a ‘laboratory’ where participants at all levels of experience can study with scholars at the leading edge of creative theoretical thought. The hallmark of SECT is its attention to both ‘pure’ and ‘applied’ modes of contemporary critical theory. The fourth annual SECT, “Cartographies of the Theological-Political”, will critically re-think religio-theological strains within disparate traditions of political thought. For more information, go to : www.uchri.org

@ Bogumil Jewsiewicki (*) will appear as commentator in a session on “The re-emergence of the memory of slavery and slave trade” chaired by Myriam Cottias (Universite des Antilles et Guyane, CNRS, France), as part of the workshop titled:”Living history: Encountering the memory of the heirs of slavery” to be held during the 122nd meeting of the American Historical Association scheduled to take place in Washington D.C on 3 – 6 January 2008. That workshop is being co-sponsored by the Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on the Global Migrations of African Peoples (York University) and by the Chaire de recherche du Canada en histoire comparree de la memoire, (Universite Laval) held by Bogumil Jewsiewicki. Participants in the session include Ibrahima Thioub and Ibrahima Seck -both from Universite Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD) of Dakar, Senegal, Benigna Zimba (Universidade Eduardo Mondlane, Mozambique) and Christine Chivallon (CNRS, France).

# Marc Michel (*) a co-présidé l’atelier “Passés Coloniaux, États et Sociétes impériales” lors du colloque international “L’Europe face à son passé colonial – Histoire, mémoire et débats publics contemporains: Approches comparatives” organisé par Olivier Dard (Université Paul Verlaine, Metz) et Daniel Lefeuvre (Université Paris 8 Saint-Denis), en partenariat avec la revue Études coloniales, tenu à Metz les 25, 26 et 27 avril 2007. Il y a également présenté une communication intitulée “Soldats africains de l’armée française : mémoires et débats” dans le cadre de l’atelier “Constructions et diffusions des mémoires des passés coloniaux”.

# Information de la revue Lusotopie

La revue Lusotopie a le plaisir d’annoncer qu’est désormais disponible sur son site l’intégralité du Volume XI, 2004 (Paris, Karthala) -Thème principal : “Médias, pouvoir et identités” Accès libre et gratuit aux résumés trilingues
(fr., port., angl.) et aux textes intégraux: www.lusotopie.sciencespobordeaux.fr/somma2004.html.

Depuis 2005, Lusotopie est devenue semestrielle, et est dorénavant publiée chez Brill (Leyde, Boston, ISSN: 1257-0273). Les résumés trilingues des volumes restent disponibles sur le site : www.lusotopie.sciencespobordeaux.fr/sommaire.html.

Les textes intégraux des articles sont diffusés par la base de données Ingenta : www.ingentaconnect.com.

Volume XII (1-2), 2005 – Thème principal : “Genre et rapports sociaux”
Texte intégral : www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/luso/2005/00000012/f0020001.

Volume XIII (1), Mai 2006 – Thème principal : “Périphéries des villes, périphéries du monde”
Texte intégral : www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/luso/2006/00000013/f0020001.

Volume XIII (2), Novembre 2006 – Thème principal : “Le politique par le bas”
Texte intégral : www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/luso/2006/00000013/f0020002.

Prochaines parutions :
– Le thème principal du volume XIV (1), à paraître en mai 2007, est “Islam en lusophonies”.
– Le thème principal du volume XIV (2), à paraître en novembre 2007, est “L’économie politique du Brésil de Lula”.

@ Lusotopie is pleased to announce the free access on its website of the entire following issue :
Volume XI, 2004 (Paris, Karthala) – Main topic: « Media, power and identities » Free access both to the trilingual abstracts (fr., port., engl.) and the full text: www.lusotopie.sciencespobordeaux.fr/somma2004.html.

Since 2005, Lusotopie became bi-annual and is now published by Brill (Leiden, Boston, ISSN 1257-0273). The trilingual abstracts of all issues are still available on our website: www.lusotopie.sciencespobordeaux.fr/sommaire.html,and full text is provided by Ingenta www.ingentaconnect.com.

Volume XII (1-2), 2005, Main topic: “Gendered social relationships”
Full text: www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/luso/2005/00000012/f0020001.

Volume XIII (1), Maiy2006, Main topic: “Urban peripheries, global peripheries”
Full text: www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/luso/2006/00000013/f0020001.

Volume XIII (2), November 2006, Main topic: “Politics from below”
Full text: www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/luso/2006/00000013/f0020002.

Forthcoming issues:
– Volume XIV (1) [to be published in May 2007]: “Islam in Portuguese-speaking areas”.
– Volume XIV (2) [to be published in November 2007]: “Political economy of Lula’s Brazil”.

Michel Cahen (*) Contact : <info.lusotopie@sciencespobordeaux.fr>

# Edmond Kwam Kouassi (*) a fait paraître un article intitulé «L’Afrique à la recherche d’une capacité de pacification continentale» dans la Revue de l’Université Catholique de l’Afrique de l’Ouest (RUCAO) n° 27. L’auteur est 1er Vice-Doyen de la Faculté de Droit de l’UCAO/UUA, à Abidjan. Le texte de cet article est disponible sur demande adressée au GRAF.

@ Robert Kappel (*) and Esther K. Ishengoma jointly contributed a section titled “Formalising Informal Firms: What can be done?” in the March 2007 issue of Poverty in Focus (“Analysing and achieving Pro-Poor Growth”) published by the International Poverty Centre (http://www.undp-povertycentre.org/), a joint project between the United Nations Development Program and the Brazilian Government to promote South-South Cooperation on applied poverty research.

This issue can be accessed at http://www.undp-povertycentre.org/pub/IPCPovertyInFocus10.pdf.

@ This is a call for papers for Africana Linguistica, n°XIV (2008) Authors are invited to submit original research contributions before February 1, 2008.

Africana Linguistica is a journal dedicated to the study of African languages with special focus on Bantu. The journal welcomes original descriptive, historical and typological papers in phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicology and semantics. Contributions on poorly documented and described languages or lesser known language areas as well as those trying to integrate linguistics into interdisciplinary approaches of the African past are highly appreciated. Fellow researchers from Africa are especially encouraged to contribute.

Africana Linguistica is a peer-reviewed and internationally oriented journal. In harmony with the editorial policy of the RMCA, all contributions are submitted to at least two anonymous peer-reviewers. The editorial team is reinforced by a national committee of associate editors, affiliated to several Belgian universities, and an international editorial board of renowned experts in African linguistics.

Africana Linguistica accepts papers in English and French. Authors are requested to strictly follow the guidelines specified in the journal’s stylesheet (see website). Contributions should be submitted before February 1st to be considered for publication in the same year, both electronically in rtf-format and preferably also in pdf-format to : <africana.linguistica@africamuseum.be> and in hard copy to : Africana Linguistica, RMCA, Leuvensesteenweg 13, 3080 Tervuren, Belgium.

# Ceci est un appel à contribution pour Africana Linguistica, n°XIV (2008). Les auteurs sont invités à soumettre des articles de recherche originale avant le 1e février 2008.

Africana Linguistica est un périodique axé sur l’étude des langues africaines, sans exclusive, mais avec un intérêt particulier pour les langues bantu et celles des groupes linguistiques qui leurs sont apparentés. Les contributions originales, tant en linguistique descriptive qu’en linguistique historique et typologique, sur des aspects aussi divers que la phonétique/phonologie, la morphologie, la syntaxe, la lexicologie et la sémantique, sont les bienvenues. Celles qui portent sur des langues peu documentées, sont tout particulièrement appréciées ainsi que celles qui cherchent à intégrer la linguistique dans des approches interdisciplinaires de l’histoire africaine. Nos collègues d’Afrique sont vivement encouragés à soumettre leurs travaux.

Africana Linguistica se veut un journal d’envergure internationale avec procédure de peer-review. Conformément à la politique éditoriale du MRAC, chaque contribution est soumise anonymement à deux experts extérieurs. L’équipe rédactionnelle est soutenue par un comité d’éditeurs associés, issus de diverses universités belges, ainsi que par un comité scientifique international composé de linguistes africanistes de renom.

Les contributions peuvent être soumises en anglais ou en français. Les auteurs sont priés de respecter scrupuleusement les recommandations de mise en forme (voir site web). En cas d’acceptation, les articles soumis avant le 1 février de chaque année seront publiés dans le courant de la même année. Ils peuvent nous être adressés, tant par courrier électronique (formats rtf et de préférence aussi pdf) à l’adresse <africana.linguistica@africamuseum.be> que par la poste, en version papier, à l’adresse: Africana Linguistica, MRAC, Leuvensesteenweg 13, 3080 Tervuren, Belgique.

More info Plus d’infos: http://www.africamuseum.be/publications/journals/AfricanaLinguistica

Koen Bostoen, Baudouin Janssens & Jacky Maniacky (éditeurs) – Muriel Garsou (assistante de rédaction)

# Le nouveau service “France 24” (L’actualité internationale 24h/24) comporte une section “Afrique” que l’on peut visiter sur le site: http://www.france24.com/france24Public/fr/nouvelles/afrique.html (NB: versions anglaise et arabe disponibles).

announcements of future events and deadlines should be submitted at least 3 months ahead

les avis ponctuels oU contenant une date-limite doivent etre transmis 3 mois d’avance au moins

# La dernière édition de l’annuaire du GRAF qui contient les noms, adresses, numéros de téléphone, de télécopieur et de courrier électronique des membres du GRAF, ainsi que ceux des participants aux colloques de 1994 et de1997 peut être dès à présent commandée au prix de US$3.00 (frais d’envoi compris) de la même façon que les autres publications du GRAF.

@ Copies of the latest edition of the GRAF Directory, listing names, addresses, phone, fax & e-mail number of GRAF affiliates and participants in the October 1994 and May 1997 conferences can be purchased for US$3.00 per unit (postage included) through the same procedure as other GRAF publications.

(*) Names listed in the GRAF Directory / Noms figurant à l’annuaire du GRAF

Subscriptions to the GRAF Newsletter are $10 per year

(Checks payable to / chèques à l’ordre de : Boston University, African Studies Center/GRAF)

Le prix de l’abonnement annuel au Bulletin du GRAF est de $10

February 2007

February 1st, 2007 in GRAF Newsletters.

@ Catherine Boone‘s (*) acclaimed work, “Merchant Capital and the Roots of State Power in Senegal”, originally published in 1992 by Cambridge University Press, is now available in a paperback edition (317 pp., tables; $48.00 – ISBN-13:9780521030397 | ISBN-10:0521030390).

@ Lucy Creevey (*), Richard Vengroff (*) & Paul Ngomo, have co-authored “Party Politics and Different Paths to Democratization: A Comparison of Benin and Senegal”, in Party Politics, vol.11, nº 4, pp. 471-493. As they see it, Benin and Senegal represent two successful cases of democratic transition in Africa. They also represent two different paths to that end. This article explores the role of political parties in facilitating these different and successful paths to democratic transitions. In Benin, political parties and political leaders relied on the prevailing patterns of ethno-regional cleavages to structure their strategic interactions, mobilize electoral support and organize competition in legislative and presidential elections. In Senegal, an incremental pattern of institutional reform helped the ruling party retain power while enabling fragmented opposition groups to participate in competitive elections. In the long run, this helped opposition groups develop an effective electoral coalition to defeat the ruling party in presidential and legislative elections and bring about a turnover.

@ Theodore Trefon (*) has written an article titled “Industrial logging in the Congo: Is a Stakeholder Approach Possible?” for the South African Journal of International Affairs, Volume 13, Issue 2, Winter/Spring 2006, pp. 101-114.

@ Claire Andrade-Watkins (*) is the producer/director of Some Kind of Funny Porto Rican? (A Cape Verdean American Story), which has been selected to compete for the Paul Robeson Diaspora Prize at the XX Annual FESPACO (Panafrican Film Festival) opening on Feb. 23, 2007. The film festival, now in its 20th year, is held every two years in Ouagadougou, the capital of Burkina Faso. “Some Kind of Funny Porto Rican?”, or simply SKFPR?, is a feature length documentary that tells the largely unknown story about immigrants from the Cape Verde Islands in the Fox Point neighborhood in Providence, Rhode Island, the second oldest and largest Cape Verdean community in America. Cape Verdeans began arriving in large numbers in the ports of Providence, Rhode Island and New Bedford, Massachusetts in the early 1900s. They crossed the Atlantic aboard packets, small sailing ships to fill the need cheap labor in the waterfronts, textile mills, factories, and cranberry bogs of southeastern New England. Urban renewal in the 1960s and l970s destroyed the tight knit Cape Verdean community bound by family, kinship, language, and seafaring traditions and displaced three generations of Cape Verdeans and their rich culture. The story of this little known community of the African Diaspora addresses many universalities of history, immigration, race relations and urban renewal. Andrade-Watkins is a professor at Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts, and president of SPIA Media Productions, Inc., which is dedicated to the documentation and preservation of the history of Cape Verdeans and the African Diaspora.

# Véronique Dimier (*) a publié: «Négocier avec les «rois nègres»: l’influence des administrateurs coloniaux français dans la mise en place d’une politique européenne de développement”, in: G. Bossuat & E. Bitch (dir.), L’Europe Unie et l’Afrique, Bruxelles: Bruylant, Nomos and Baden, 2006, p. 393-409. Elle a égalament publié (en anglais): “Three universities and the British elite: a science of colonial administration in the UK”, in: Public Administration, 2005, n°84, n°2, 2006, p. 337-366; “Constructing conditionality: the bureaucratization of EC development aid”, in: Journal of European Foreign Affairs, n°11, 2006, p. 263-280 et (avec M. Mcgeever): “Diplomats without a flag: the institutionalization of the delegations of the European Commission in ACP countries”, in: Journal of Common Market Studies, vol. 44, n°3, 2006, p. 483-505.

# Gérard Prunier (*) a assuré la publication de l’ouvrage collectif intitulé “L’Éthiopie contemporaine” qui vient de paraître aux Éditions Karthala (4440 pp.; 32 € – ISBN 2-84586-736-9). L’ouvrage est co-publié par le Centre Français des Etudes Ethiopiennes (CFEE) que Prunier a dirigé de 2001 à 2006.

# Hélène Claudot-Hawad (*) a dirigé la publication de l’ouvrage collectif “Berbères ou Arabes? Le tango des spécialistes”(Paris, Editions Non Lieu, 2006, 298 p.- 30 € – ISBN : 2-35270-015-9). Outre l’introduction, elle y apporte un chapitre intitulé “Quand l’étude des marges devient marginale: réflexions à partir du ‘terrain’ touareg”. Pour les détail du contenu de cet ouvrage, voir le site: http://www.editionsnonlieu.fr/spip.php?article7

(*) Names listed in the GRAF Directory / Noms figurant à l’annuaire du GRAF

@ Benedetta Rossi (*) offered a lecture titled “Dependence and Independence in the Ader: Articulations of Slavery and Colonialism in Niger” on 8 February, in the Africa Seminar series of the University of London’s Centre of African Studies.

@ Mamadou Diouf (*) has been hired to lead Columbia’s Institute for African Studies at the School of International and Public Affairs. Diouf will also become a faculty member in Columbia’s Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures. In his announcement, Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger said: “We are delighted to have someone of Mamadou Diouf’s extraordinary talents and admired scholarship to join us and take on the leadership of our Institute for African Studies. His hiring is an important step toward fulfilling our goal of making Columbia the foremost center for teaching and research (…) on Africa —its history and culture, its politics and economics, its challenges in public health and extraordinary human potential.” Diouf will join Columbia on July 1. He is currently a member of the faculty at the University of Michigan in the Department of History, where he also serves in the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies.

@ Patrick Manning (*), who has left Northeastern University for the University of Pittsburgh, where he now holds an Andrew W. Mellon Professorship of World History, has recently published “Cross-Community Migration: A Distinctive Human Pattern” in: Social Evolution and History 5, 2 (2006); “Homo sapiens Populates the Earth: A provisional synthesis, privileging linguistic data” in: Journal of World History 17, 2 (2006), pp. 115-158; and “Interactions and Connections: Locating and Managing Historical Complexity” in: The History Teacher 39, 2 (2006), pp. 1-21. His latest book, “The African Diaspora: A History through Culture” has just been published by Oxford University Press (256 pp.; $21.00 Paper /$45.00 Hardcover – ISBN-10: 0195158156 ISBN-13: 978-0195158151).

@ Ulf Engel (*) & Robert Kappel (*) have co-edited the second (expanded, updated and revised) edition of “Germany’s Africa Policy Revisited: Interests, images and incrementalism”. (Muenster & Piscataway, NJ : LIT-Verlag & Transaction Publishers, 2006; 216 pp., 20.90 €, ISBN 3-8258-5985-1) The book first reviews Germany’s relations with the African continent over the past decades. Secondly, it addresses some crucial factual gaps which characterize the state of research so far. Thirdly, it discusses some of the theoretical and methodological undercurrents of past research. Contributors include Ulf Engel, Robert Kappel and Andreas Mehler(*).

# Christopher Fomunyoh (*), qui est directeur pour l’Afrique du National Democratic Institute, (Institut national pour la démocratie), un organisme financé par le Congrès américain et basé à Washington, a commenté dans une interview recueillie par RFI (Radio France Internationale) l’infléchissement que l’on peut attendre dans la politique américaine après le basculement dans le camp démocrate du Sénat et de la Chambre des représentants, avec ses conséquences pour l’Afrique. Selon lui, «on peut s’attendre à un changement de politique pour l’Afrique avec l’arrivée des démocrates, excepté dans le domaine de la sécurité.» On pourra retrouver cette interview (émise le 12 novembre 2006) sur le site de RFI à l’URL: http://www.rfi.fr/actufr/articles/083/article_47430.asp

EXPRESSIONS OF TRADITIONAL WISDOM

INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

Brussels, Thursday 27 – Friday 28 SEPTEMBER 2007

The Royal Academy for Overseas Sciences, in collaboration with the Royal Museum for Central Africa and the Royal Museums of Art and History, is organizing an international symposium devoted to “Expressions of Traditional Wisdom” of cultures from “overseas”, i.e., Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Americas including the ancient civilizations of these continents.

The notion of “wisdom” in the sense of practical wisdom has entered Western civilization through biblical texts. In the Hellenic experience this kind of wisdom received a more structural character in the form of philosophy. In this sense philosophy also reflects one of the expressions of traditional wisdom.

The following themes have been retained: Expressions of Traditional Wisdom in:

1. Religion
2. Philosophy
3. Gender Studies
4. The Afterlife
5. Family Life
6. Justice
7. Education
8. Power/Authority Politics
9. Contemporary Literature
10. Material Culture
11. Linguistics
12. Health

For information: Prof. Dr Danielle Swinne, Permanent Secretary, Royal Academy for Overseas Sciences
rue Defacqz 1/3 B- 1000 Brussels, Belgium
Tel.: (0032) 2 538 02 11 – Fax: (0032) 2 539 23 53 – E-mail: kaowarsom@skynet.be

@ Robert Kappel(*) and Tina Schneidenbach have written a short monograph titled “China in Afrika: Herausforderungen für den Westen” in the latest issue (Nr. 12/2006) of the series GIGA Focus Global published by the German Institute of Global and Area Studies / Leibniz-Institut für Globale und Regionale Studien in Hamburg. This study follows the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation“ (FOCAC) held in Beijing November 2006. The GIGA Focus Global series offers condensed analyses on topical political, economic or social subjects that are directed towards a broad German-speaking public in the areas of politics, economy, media, and society.

The document is accessible at: http://www.giga-hamburg.de/content/publikationen/pdf/gf_global_0612.pdf

# François Ibara (*) a participé à Brazzaville du 9 au 15 décembre 2006 à deux ateliers sur les capacités évaluatives en Afrique centrale et de l’Ouest , sur le plan national pour l’atteinte des OMD au Congo. Leurs objectifs respectifs sont: reconnaitre l’importance du suivi et évaluation dans les politiques de développement,s’appropprier du processus, d’une part.De l’autre, présenter aux differentes institutions (Gouvernement,partenaires au développement,société civile), le premier draft du plan national pour l’atteinte des OMD.

@ Achille Mbembe (*) will participate in the 4th annual Seminar in Experimental Critical Theory (SECT), an intensive two-week summer program offered by the University of California Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI) on the campus of the University of California at Irvine August 6-17, 2007. Neither an introductory survey nor an advanced research seminar, SECT functions as a ‘laboratory’ where participants at all levels of experience can study with scholars at the leading edge of creative theoretical thought. The hallmark of SECT is its attention to both ‘pure’ and ‘applied’ modes of contemporary critical theory. The fourth annual SECT, “Cartographies of the Theological-Political”, will critically re-think religio-theological strains within disparate traditions of political thought. For more information, go to : www.uchri.org.

# Philippe Hugon (*) vient de publier “Géopolitique de l’Afrique” (Paris: Armand Colin, 2006; Collection “Géopolitique”, no.128; 127 pp. 9,00 € – ISBN-10: 220034676X – ISBN-13: 978-2200346768). Après un tableau de l’histoire précoloniale et coloniale, cet ouvrage analyse, à l’échelle du continent mais en insistant sur la diversité des acteurs qui s’y côtoient, ses champs économiques, sociopolitiques et culturels. Il en explique enfin les défis actuels majeurs : paix et sécurité, enjeux alimentaires, développement durable. D’autre part, la 5ème édition de son ouvrage bien connu, “L’Économie de l’Afrique” vient également de paraître(Paris: Editions ‘La Découverte’, 2006 – Collection: Repères; 123 pages; 8,50 € -ISBN-10: 2707148873 – ISBN-13: 978-2707148872). Il a également rédigé le chapitre ‘Afrique’ de “L’Année stratégique 2006” publié par l’IRIS (Institut de Relations Internationales et Stratégiques) aux éditions Dalloz et a signé une dizaine d’articles consacrés à l’Afrique dans diverses revues.

# Éloïse Brière (*) a publié un chapitre intitulé “Le Rire des gens d’en bas” dans l’ouvrage dirigé par Jozef Kwaterko, “L’humour et le rire dans les littératures francophones des Amériques” (Paris: Eds. L’Harmattan, 2006 – Coll.: Itinéraires et Contacts de cultures n°36; 198 pages; 19,50 € -ISBN: 2-296-00242-0). Elle a également participé au “Festschrift für Frederick Ivor Case” publié sous la direction de Najib Redouane (Paris: L’Harmattan, 2006) sous la forme d’une contribution intitulée “Quand la marge atteint le centre: Mongo Beti et le postcolonialisme”.

# Michel Cahen (*) a publié: «A problemática do pluralismo em Moçambique, numa perspectiva histórica comparada», in: N. Vidal, J. Pinto de Andrade, “O processo de transição para o multipartidarismo em Angola” (Lisbonne, Firmamento, 334).

@ William F. S. Miles(*) published a “Letter from Ouagadougou” in the Antioch Review 64 (Winter 2006), pp.99-116. His earlier article, “Socialist Society in the Seychelles”, appeared in the Contemporary Review, no. 257 (Dec 2005), pp. 340-350.

# Le nouveau service “France 24” (L’actualité internationale 24h/24) comporte une section “Afrique” que l’on peut visiter sur le site: http://www.france24.com/france24Public/fr/nouvelles/afrique.html (NB: versions anglaise et arabe disponibles).

# Après “Voix sans issue”, son premier roman paru chez Actes Sud en 2005 et traduit dans une quinzaine de langues, Céline Curiol (*) vient de publier “Permission”, chez le même éditeur.(2006- Broché; 252 pages, 7,50 € – ISBN-10: 2742765484 / ISBN-13: 978-2742765485).

# COLLOQUE JEAN- FRANÇOIS MÉDARD

Les 29, 30 et 31 mars, le CEAN/IEP et la Revue internationale de politique comparée (RIPC), organisent un colloque en l’honneur de Jean-François Médard: «Le comparatisme à la croisée des chemins. Autour de l’oeuvre de Jean-François Médard: néo-patrimonialisme, corruption, gouvernement local, échange et éthique politiques ». Daniel Bach (*), Dominique Darbon (*) et Comi Toulabor (*) sont les responsables scientifiques de ce colloque qui, comme son titre l’indique, est une façon de rendre hommage à la mémoire de Jean-François Médard, décédé l’an dernier. Parmi les participants: René Otayek (*), Michel Cahen (*), René Lemarchand (*) ( avec une communication sur “Les avatars du clientélisme: ‘warlordism’, ‘greed’ et l’économie d’affection”), Alice Sindzingre (*) (“The Posterity of Neopatrimonialism”), et Comi Toulabor (*) (“Les réseaux néopatrimoniaux en Afrique: la filière franc-maçonne est-elle soluble dans les réseaux françafricains?”) Pour le programme complet, voir: COLLOQUE JEAN- FRANÇOIS MÉDARD.

# Daniel Bach (*) a publié «Nigeria : paradoxes de l’abondance et démocratisation en trompe l’oeil» dans le n° 219 (Octobre 2006) de la revue Afrique contemporaine, pp. 119-135. Les 11-12 décembre, à Hambourg, il a présenté au German Institute for Global and Area Studies une communication intitulée: “Nigeria’s ‘manifest destiny’: or influence without power” à la Conference on ‘Regional Powers in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

# Alice Sindzingre (*) a fourni un chapitre intitulé: “The Relevance of the Concepts of Formality and Informality: A Theoretical Appraisal”, dans l’ouvrage collectif dirigé par B. Guha-Khasnobis, R. Kanbur et El. Ostrom (eds.), Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies” (Oxford University Press & WIDER, 2006). Avec Machiko Nissanke, elle a publié: «Institutional Foundations for Shared Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa », in: African Development Review, vol. 18, n° 3, December 2006, p. 353-391. Elle a également publié quelques chroniques dans le supplément du journal Le Monde: le Monde de l’économie: ‘La Chine en Afrique : le pire n’est pas sûr’ (12 décembre 206); ‘Le darwinisme : une approche de l’économie’, (7 novembre 2006) et ‘Le retour des politiques industrielles’ (3 octobre 2006). En outre, lors du Huitième Colloque Franco-Japonais de Sciences Économiques tenu les 6–7 novembre 2006 à l’Université de Paris X-Nanterre sur le thème “Vers une Communauté Économique des Pays d’Asie de l’Est”, elle a présenté une communication intitulée: “Foreign Direct Investment and Growth: the Example of Japanese Firms and Investment in East Asia”.

# Daniel Bach (*) a publié «Nigeria : paradoxes de l’abondance et démocratisation en trompe l’oeil» dans le n° 219 (Octobre 2006) de la revue Afrique contemporaine, pp. 119-135. Les 11-12 décembre, à Hambourg, il a présenté au German Institute for Global and Area Studies une communication intitulée: “Nigeria’s ‘manifest destiny’: or influence without power” à la Conference on ‘Regional Powers in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

@ Laurent Fourchard (*) opened the inaugural session of the three-day conference of the International Research Group (GDRI) on Governing cities in Africa: Laws, local institutions & urban identities since 1945/ Gouverner les villes d’Afrique: Lois, institutions locales & identités urbaines depuis 1945” held on 31 January–2 February 2007 at the CEAN/IEP (Institute of Political Science) in Bordeaux. [To see the program of that conference, go to: http://www.cean.sciencespobordeaux.fr/prog_conf_gdri.pdf ]. This was followed on 5 February by a CNRS-sponsored methodological seminar devoted to “Minorités et étrangers dans les villes d’Afrique: politiques publiques, pratiques et représentations”, which he coordinated with Aurelia Wa Kabwe Segatti (IFAS, Johannesburg). A regional IRG/GRDI seminar on the same topic had been held on 6-17 November 2006 at Stellenbosch University on cities in South Africa and Mozambique. Shortly therafter, on 23 November, at Oxford University’s St Anthony College, Fourchard had read a paper titled: “A new name for an old practice: Vigilante in South-western Nigeria”.

announcements of future events and deadlines should be submitted at least 3 months ahead

les avis ponctuels oU contenant une date-limite doivent etre transmis 3 mois d’avance au moins

# La dernière édition de l’annuaire du GRAF qui contient les noms, adresses, numéros de téléphone, de télécopieur et de courrier électronique des membres du GRAF, ainsi que ceux des participants aux colloques de 1994 et de1997 peut être dès à présent commandée au prix de US$3.00 (frais d’envoi compris) de la même façon que les autres publications du GRAF.

# Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch (*) participait à la journée organisée par le CVUH (Comité de vigilance face aux usages publics de l’Histoire) le 4 mars 2006 sous le titre: “Sur les usages publics de l’histoire. Polémiques, commémorations, enjeux de mémoire, transmission et enseignement”. Le CVUH, qui groupe plus de 75 historiens (parmi lesquels Claude-Hélène Perrot (*) et Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch) est né d’une réaction à la loi francaise du 23 février 2005 dont l’article 4 exigeait des enseignants qu’ils insistent sur «le rôle positif» de la colonisation et a réagi par le publication d’un manifeste daté du 17 juin 2005 (on en trouvera le texte sur le site: http://cvuh.free.fr/manifeste.html). Lors de la journée du 6 mars, Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch avait présenté une communication intitulée: “Le Passé colonial entre histoire et mémoire” dont on pourra retrouver le texte sur le site : http://cvuh.free.fr/4mars/coquery.passe.colonial.html (une version sonore existe à : http://cvuh.free.fr/4mars/coquery.mp3) Le texte et/ou l’enregistrement (sonore ou video) des autres communications est accessible à partir du site http://cvuh.free.fr/4mars/

Dans le prolongement de la journée du 4 mars 2006, le CVUH a organisé, à partir de janvier 2007 une série de conferences ouvertes à tous. Ces conférences, qui se tiennent dans la salle Marc Bloch (UFR d’Histoire), 17 rue de la Sorbonne, Paris Ve, proposent des mises au point hitoriographiques accompagnée d’une analyses sur l’ctualité des “usages publics” de l’histoire. Dans cette série, Catherine Cooquery-Vidrovitch donnera une conference intitulée: “La France postcoloniale en question: enjeux et action” le Jeudi 14 juin 2007 à 19h00 dans la salle Marc Bloch (UFR d’Histoire), 17 rue de la Sorbonne, Paris Ve. Pour le programme complet de cette série, voir: http://cvuh.free.fr/images/conf.cvuh.2007.pdf

@ Copies of the latest edition of the GRAF Directory, listing names, addresses, phone, fax & e-mail number of GRAF affiliates and participants in the October 1994 and May 1997 conferences can be purchased for US$3.00 per unit (postage included) through the same procedure as other GRAF publications.

@ Kassim Kone (*) and Ilyas Ba-Yunus have co-authored a book titled Muslims in the United States” (Greenwood CT, Greenwood Press, 2006; 192 pages, tables; $55.00 – ISBN: 0-313-32825-0 – ISBN-13: 978-0-313-32825-1). Kassim Kone’s article, “When male becomes female and female becomes male in Mande”, published in Wagadu, vol. 1 (Spring 2004) is available online at: http://web.cortland.edu/wagadu/Volume%201/Printable/kone.pdf. An earlier version of this article had appeared in Mande Studies (4), 2002.

@ François Ibara (*) is scheduled to present a paper titled “Building a culture of peace in Congo-Brazzaville” as part of a panel “African cultural values and Peace building” at the 16th Annual Africa/Diaspora Conference to be held April 26-28, 2007 in Sacramento CA. The conference is organized by the College of Health & Human Services and the Center for African Peace & Conflict Resolution in collaboration with the Pan African Studies Program at California Sacramento University, and its theme is: “Building a Culture of Peace in Africa: Best Practices/Models”.

@ Fallou Ngom (*) has presented two papers on the use of language analysis in asylum applications by African refugees at the University of Texas, Austin (March 2006) and at the 2d European IAFL Conference on Forensic Linguistics / Language and the Law held on September 14-16 at the Institut Universitari de Lingüistica Aplicada in Barcelona. He has also contributed a section on “Arabic Loanwords in Wolof” in the “Encyclopedia of Arabic Language And Linguistics”, ed. by Kees Versteegh (Brill Academic Publishers, 2007 ; $267.00 – ISBN-10: 9004144765 – ISBN-13: 978-9004144767).

(*) Names listed in the GRAF Directory / Noms figurant à l’annuaire du GRAF

Subscriptions to the GRAF Newsletter are $10 per year

(Checks payable to / chèques à l’ordre de : Boston University, African Studies Center/GRAF)

Le prix de l’abonnement annuel au Bulletin du GRAF est de $10

October 2006

October 1st, 2006 in GRAF Newsletters.

# Augustin Loada (*) est l’auteur d’un article intitulé “L’élection présidentielle du 13 novembre 2005: un plébiscite par défaut”, paru dans la revue Politique africaine (n° 101 – mars-avril 2006, pp.19-41) centré sur le thème: “Burkina Faso: l’alternance impossible”. Loada résume le contenu de cet article dans les termes suivants: “Le 13 novembre 2005, Blaise Compaoré remportait sa troisième élection présidentielle consécutive, avec plus de 80 % des suffrages. Ce plébiscite est pourtant paradoxal, compte tenu de la forte mobilisation contre le régime de la fin des années 1990 et du mécontentement persistant de la population. Il s’explique par la puissance de la machine clientéliste du parti au pouvoir, la popularité reconquise par le président à l’occasion de la crise ivoirienne et la faiblesse entretenue de l’opposition. Mais la faiblesse de la participation témoigne de la désaffection de l’électorat au moins autant que de son incompétence politique”.

@ Robert Kappel (*) co-authored with Esther Ishengoma (University of Dar es Salaam) a monograph titled: “Economic Growth and Poverty: Does Formalisation of Informal Enterprises Matter?” published by the German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA) as No 20 in the GIGA Working Paper Series (April 2006). The two authors argue:

“The informal sector (IS) plays a significant role in developing countries viz. the provision of employment, income and supplying ignored markets. However, working and employment conditions within the sector are still poor. Its expansion and changing structures have thus drawn the attention of scholars and international policy makers to the factors hindering its formalisation. Among the factors addressed are the high costs of formalisation and the lack of incentives for operating in the formal sector. A variety of approaches have been adopted by different stakeholders to overcome these factors. This paper assesses these approaches along with the factors related to informality-formality trade-off and the issue of formalisation as a solution for firms’ growth. By focussing on the problems faced by informal enterprises and the literature which addresses the options for accelerating the formalisation of informal enterprises, the paper will briefly summarise the weaknesses of these approaches”. This monograph can be accessed at here.

@ Michael Bratton (*) presented a paper titled: “Poor People and Democratic Citizenship in Africa” in the workshop on Poverty and Democracy held at Duke University, February 17-18, 2006. The paper has been published as an Afrobarometer Working Paper (no. 56), and can be accessed at here.

@ Michael Meeuwis (*) has authored an article on “The Lingála-Kiswahili border in north-eastern Congo: Its origins in Belgian colonial state formation of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries”, published in Africana Linguistica, Vol. XII (2006) 184 pp. Ed.: K. Bostoen, B. Janssens, J. Maniacky (Tervuren, Musée Royal de l’Afrique Centrale), ISBN 90-75894-88-0 ISSN 0065-4124. 18 euro.

# Laurent Fourchard (*) vient de publier un bon papier sur la délinquance juvénile à Lagos pendant l’époque coloniale: “Lagos and the invention of juvenile delinquency in Nigeria , 1920-1960” dans la revue Journal of African History, 47:1 (2006), pp.115-137.

@ Stephen Ellis (*) presented a paper titled: “The mutual assimilation of elites: the development of secret societies in 20th century Liberian politics” at the workshop held October 19-21, 2006 at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology on the theme: “The Powerful Presence of the Past: Historical Dimensions of Integration and Conflict in the Upper Guinea Coast”. In that same workshop, he also chaired one of the two sessions devoted to “Traditional Authorities versus New Social and Political Practices Within and Beyond the Nation State”.

@ Phyllis M. Martin (*) contributed an article titled: “Célébrer l’ordinaire: Eglise, Empire et Genre dans la vie de Mère Marie-Michelle Dédié (Sénégal, Congo, 1882-1931)” in Le Fait Missionnaire: Social sciences & missions, no.18 / July 2006.

@ Rémi Bazenguissa-Ganga (*) is scheduled to deliver a paper titled: “Le politique en colonie: violence, guerres électorales et construction de l’État au Moyen-Congo”/”Politics in the Colony: Violence, Electoral Wars and State-Building in Colonial Congo-Brazzaville” on the panel “Le retour du politique/Is Political History Back?” (chaired by Michael Schatzberg) for the conference “New Research in Equatorial Africa/État des lieux sur la recherche en Afrique Équatoriale” to be held on October 14, 2006 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

(*) Names listed in the GRAF Directory / Noms figurant à l’annuaire du GRAF

West Africa Review : Call for Papers

@ This is a call for papers for the forthcoming issue of the peer-reviewed electronic journal West Africa Review on Politics, Society and Culture in Bénin and Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) Issue 10, Spring 2007.

This issue will provide scholarly and critical examinations of current political, social and cultural issues in the post-independence history of the two Francophone countries which, in spite of their common French colonial past and present, have evolved in different directions.

Papers are expected to focus on critical approaches to democratization and globalization, geo-political importance in West Africa and on the continent, literary and cultural production —arts, music, literature, films, video production— new roles of information and communication technologies, religion and society/ politics, women and society, identity, social class, and ethnicity. However, articles are not limited to those topics. Comparative studies are welcome.

  • All papers should be original and previously unpublished in English (with French abstract) or French (with English abstract).
  • Please include a coversheet with your name, title, affiliation, keywords, the abstract, and an autobiographical paragraph.
  • All articles and book reviews should be sent electronically (MS Word, RTF, or PDF) to the guest editor: simon.akindes@uwp.edu by December 22, 2006
  • Publication decisions will be made by blind review – make sure your name does not appear on any page other than the coversheet.

Recommended Guide Style for Submission

  • It is the author’s responsibility to prepare his or her document for conversion by adhering to the following Word document style formatting.
  • Use heading level one (H1) for titles, abstract, endnotes, and references/works cited/bibliography.
  • Use heading level two (H2) for the first level of heading used in the text.
  • Use levels 3 through 6 for subsequent levels.
  • Use paragraph tabs for basic paragraph text.
  • Use indent tab for all quotes and indented text.

West Africa Review does not have a preferred form for citation and referencing. The style is left to the author. The only requirement is that the author be consistent throughout the text. You may visit West Africa Review at here.

West Africa Review : Appel à Communications

# Ceci est un invitation à soumettre des articles pour la publication de la revue électronique West Africa Review sur le thème suivant: Politique, Société et Culture au Bénin et en Côte d’Ivoire, Numéro 10, Printemps 2007.

Ce numéro livrera des approches intellectuelles et critiques sur de différents aspects politiques, sociaux et culturels de l’histoire récente du Bénin et de la Côte d’ivoire, deux pays qui, malgré leur passés coloniaux et présents francophones, évoluent dans des directions différentes.

Les auteurs sont invités à soumettre des papiers critiques portant sur l’un des thèmes suivants: démocratisation, globalisation/mondialisation, production culturelle —art, musique, littérature, films, vidéo— nouvelles technologies de l’information et de la communication, religion et société, femmes et société, identités, classes sociales, ethnisme. Cependant, les articles ne devraient pas se limiter à ces thèmes. Les études comparatives sont encouragées.

Modalités pratiques:

  • Toutes les contributions doivent être originales et n’avoir jamais été publiées dans une autre revue; elles doivent être écrites en anglais (avec résumé en français) ou en français (avec résumé en anglais)
  • Insérez une page/couverture qui porte votre nom, titre et institution, les mots-clés, le résumé (dans la langue non-utilisée pour le papier) et un paragraphe autobiographique.
  • Tous les articles doivent être soumis électroniquement sous une des versions suivantes: MS Word (.doc),.RTF, ou PDF au rédacteur invité: simon.akindes@uwp.edu le 22 décembre 2006, date limite de réception.
  • Les décisions de publication seront effectuées de manière anonyme par un comité scientifique: Assurez-vous que votre nom n’apparaît sur une page autre que la page de couverture.

Style recommandé:
Il appartient à l’auteur d’observer les principes de formatage Word afin que son document puisse être aisément converti:

  • Utilisez le titre niveau 1 (H1) for les titres, le résumé, les notes en fin de document, les citations/sources utilisées et les références bibliographiques;
  • Utilisez le titre niveau 2 (H2) pour le premier niveau de titre utilisé dans le texte;
  • Utilisez les niveaux 3 à 6 pour les niveaux suivants;
  • Utilisez la touche de tabulation pour un paragraphe normal;
  • Utilisez le retrait/espacement avant texte pour toutes les citations et les autres alinéas;

West Africa Review n’utilise pas de style préféré pour les citations et références bibliographiques. L’appréciation en est laissée à l’auteur. Le style choisi doit être le même dans tout le document. Vous pouvez visiter West Africa Review à http://www.africaresource.com/war.

CALL FOR PAPERS: African Trajectories of Slavery
Perceptions, Practices, Experiences (25-26 May 2007)

Centre of African Studies, University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies

Twenty-five years since Igor Kopytoff asked, in a review of anthropological contributions to the study of slavery, why modern anthropology had ‘consistently ignored so widespread a phenomenon,’ the Anthropology of Slavery has remained a relatively narrow field. Although there have been important contributions that constitute, today, ‘classical’ ethnographies of slavery, most of the data we dispose of are historical and focused primarily on the Americas and the Atlantic Slave Trade. The Atlantic trade constituted a massive African diaspora. The descendents of African slaves have formed communities in the Americas, where the study of slavery has become intertwined with a number of other themes, including race, politics, and religion. Historical studies focusing on Africa have tended to end their analytical itinerary three or four decades into the twentieth century. The 1930s/1940s witnessed the ‘sedimentation’ of prolonged ideological and political negotiations over the question of slavery in the colonies, reflected in a series of administrative measures that changed the configuration of opportunities available to people of slave status. They also led to the establishment of new governmentalities, economic arrangements, trade dynamics, and forms of labour. However, most students of slavery agree that they did not mark the end of slavery. African slavery is a complex phenomenon that cuts across multiple social domains and articulates, at different times and in different contexts, changing ways of thinking about hierarchy and sociality. Such complexity inevitably calls into question the appropriateness of any single term to define the polymorphism of African slavery, and of any single date to mark its extinction. Thus, in their study of the decline of slavery in Northern Nigeria from 1987 to 1936, Lovejoy and Hogendorn note that ‘[t]oday people can still be found who are considered slaves, although the actual number of people still technically so has declined to relative insignificance. The death of slavery, pronounced by so many observers, has been a protracted one and is still not over’ (1993:30).

The disappearance of slavery from official representations of African society and its actual resilience in the lived experience of people constitutes a critical sociological tension within many contemporary African countries. Certain people are characterised as being of slave origin, or as members of ethnically or geographically defined areas that imply slave status. Common parlance is replete with stereotypes that identify people of slave status on the basis of their physical and/or psychological traits, their habits and lifestyle, their ways of talking, moving, and thinking. ‘Slavery’ is either conceived of as something that can be ‘read’ on the body and behaviour of its bearers; or it constitutes secret knowledge accessible only in particular circumstances. People of slave descent often struggle to conceal their origins but not everyone is equally successful at ‘passing as non-slave.’ In some cases, descendents of slaves have been able to negotiate a new social status for themselves and their children through migration, the adoption of new identities, and various strategies of upward mobility. But for the weaker and poorer amongst them, a rupture with the past may be more costly or risky than keeping alive ties of dependence from benign old masters. In times of hardship we witness relapses in institutionalised forms of dependence that decrease the risk of livelihood failure. The evolution of new hierarchies and new dynamics of mise en dépendance calls for a critical reassessment of analytical frameworks, terminologies, and theoretical paradigms to understand African slavery in its contemporary manifestations and regional diversity.

For a variety of reasons, including issues related to the history of anthropological thought, the difficulties inherent in obtaining information about a condition that carries considerable social stigma, and the reluctance of African governments and national research institutions to support research on this theme, slavery is rarely addressed directly in contemporary anthropological debate. Despite these objective difficulties, African slavery today raises questions of sociological and ethical import. Does the term ‘slavery’ provide an accurate definition for the multiple forms of labour and dependence that are often labelled so? How does slavery as an inherited status relate to new forms of dependent labour and the structural exploitation of certain categories of people? What are the axes of continuity and change with past forms of slavery, and in the historical experience of ‘slaves’? How far does slave status affect the economic and social opportunities of its bearers? How does it influence their strategies and aspirations?

The Seminar’s focus on ‘trajectories of slavery’ emphasises agency and process. It aims at advancing our understanding of how socially and historically constituted knowledge about ‘slavery’ is embodied in a whole set of institutions and in the everyday practices of people in contemporary African societies. Provisionally structured around the following themes, the Seminar welcomes proposals for papers from any African region and theoretical perspective:

  1. Definitions and dimensions of slavery: perceptions and interpretations of ‘slavery’ across groups and institutions; epistemological negotiations over the meanings and implications of ‘slavery’; relations with notions of class, caste, and hierarchy; conflicting discourses of ‘slavery’ across social groups and contexts; political, religious, mythical, and economic dimensions of ‘slavery’ and related phenomena.
  2. Practices of slavery: practices related to ‘slavery’, enslaving, and emancipation; how slavery, servility and dependence relate to particular livelihood strategies and coping mechanisms; functional aspects of status and rank; the sensitivity of slavery, as an institution, to changing economic and political circumstances.
  3. Experiences of slavery: life histories and actor oriented accounts of slavery and related institutions in today’s African societies; forms of religious and artistic expression related to slavery; slavery experienced through the body; physical, imaginative, and ritual environments in which ‘slavery’ is experienced and/or enacted.

Benedetta Rossi & Richard Fardon School of Oriental and African Studies, Department of Sociology & Anthropology

Practical Information:

Language: the working language of the seminar is English, but papers / presentations in French are accepted. Abstracts, in French or English, should be between 300-500 words.

Fees and costs: The Seminar has a participation fee of UK £10 per person. Limited funding may be available for participants from Africa who do not have access to other funding opportunities.

Final date for submission of abstracts: 07 December 2006 – Notification of accepted papers: 15 January 2007

Contacts and correspondence: Dr. Benedetta Rossi, br4@soas.ac.uk Ms. Angelica Baschiera, ab17@soas.ac.uk

@ The 2006 Gender Symposium organized by CODESRIA on the theme: “Gender in the Construction of the Democratic Developmental State” will be held 12 – 14 November, 2006 in Cairo, Egypt. More information can be obtained from: The 2006 CODESRIA Gender Symposium, CODESRIA, BP 3304, CP 18524 – Dakar, Senegal. [Tel: +221 8259822/23 Fax: +221 824 12 89] E-mail: Gender.Symposium@codesria.sn Website: http://www.codesria.org/

African Geographical Review – Call for Submissions

As new editors of the African Geographical Review (formerly the East African Geographical Review), we write to solicit quality research manuscript submissions. The African Geographical Review is a peer reviewed journal published annually by the Africa Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers. It provides a medium for publication of geographical material relating to Africa and seeks to enhance the standing of regional geography by promoting a better representation of geographic scholarship on Africa. We welcome submissions from any sub-field of geography as well as contributions that are theoretical, empirical or applied in nature.

Five kinds of submissions are requested: research articles, methodological or field notes, featured reflections, commentaries and book reviews. Research articles should consist of original research material and not exceed 7000 words in length. Methodological or field notes explore methodological or field issues and should not exceed 4000 words. Research articles and methodological or field notes are peer reviewed. They should be accompanied by a 150-word abstract and three to four keywords. Featured reflections on an aspect of African geographical scholarship should be no more than 2500 words. Commentaries are short punchy articles (up to 1000 words) that address a contemporary African issue. Featured reflections and commentaries are reviewed in-house by the editors and the editorial board. Book reviews should be no more than 750 words and the editor should be contacted about a potential book review before it is undertaken.

Articles should be submitted to Ian Yeboah at Miami University of Ohio via e-mail. Inquiries can be made via e-mail or phone. More information on the journal may be found at: http://www.macalester.edu/geography/agr/

Ian Yeboah, Editor
yeboahie@muohio.edu
513-529-5013

William Moseley, Associate Editor
moseley@macalester.edu
651-696-6126 (Fax: 651-696-6116)

BLACK PARIS – PARIS BLACK

Art et Histoire de la communauté africaine à Paris

Paris, la capitale de l’ancien empire colonial français, est aujourd’hui la plus grande enclave africaine d’Europe. Environ un cinquième des 12 millions de personnes que compte Paris et sa banlieue a une origine africaine, antillaise ou afro-américaine. A Paris, tous les processus de métissage, d’interactions culturelles et artistiques qui caractérisent les relations entre le Nord et le Sud peuvent s’observer, concentrés dans l’espace et dans le temps.

L’exposition Black Paris s’ouvre sur une rétrospective de l’époque coloniale et la découverte de «l’art nègre» et s’achève sur les initiatives de la Diaspora, les magasins, les maisons d’édition, les projets artistiques grâce auxquels Paris est devenu au début du 21e siècle le centre mondial de la mode, de la musique, de l’art et de la littérature africaine.

L’exposition Black Paris aborde et présente l’évolution de cette diaspora à partir d’une double perspective englobant aussi bien l’histoire, à travers des documents d’archives, que l’histoire de l’art. Au centre de cette exposition se trouveront les travaux de plasticiens, d’écrivains, de créateurs, de politiciens et théoriciens.

La structure de l’exposition est chronologique et comprend cinq sections thématiques :

  1. Rétrospective : iconographie coloniale, art nègre et recrutement de soldats noirs pendant la Première Guerre mondiale.
  2. La « négrophilie » de l’entre-deux-guerre (Harlem Renaissance, Jazz et Surréalisme).
  3. La Négritude : initiée par Aimé Césaire et Léopold Sédar Senghor : Ecrivains et artistes esquissent à Paris le programme d’une modernité africaine.
  4. Les années 1960 et 1970 : Images de la ville et des quartiers en mutation: vers une topographie du Paris noir.
  5. Migration et métissage: La scène de l’art contemporain au début du XXIe siècle.

Un catalogue bilingue (allemand/français) de 280 pages avec des images et des textes édité par Peter Hammer Verlag à Wuppertal paraîtra en octobre 2006.

Itinéraire de l’exposition: Bayreuth, Iwalewa-Haus, 26 octobre 2006 – 10 février 2007 ¤ Francfort, Musée des Cultures du Monde, 3 mars – fin septembre 2007 ¤ Paris, à partir d’octobre 2007.