Trustee Scholarship

The deadline for application to the 2019 Trustee Scholarship has passed. Please check back here to learn about next year’s deadline as more information becomes available.

Every year, BU welcomes approximately 20 outstanding students to the Trustee Scholars Program. Many of our current Scholars had perfect 4.0 grade point averages in high school and ranked in the top of their class.

In addition to exceptional academic credentials, Trustee Scholars are intellectually and creatively adventurous and demonstrate viewpoints, experiences, or achievements beyond the usual. They are, in other words, not just top students, but extraordinarily well-rounded individuals. At BU, Trustee Scholars become part of a unique campus community that offers many intellectual, cultural, and social opportunities.

A Trustee Scholarship covers full undergraduate tuition plus mandatory undergraduate student fees, and is renewable for four years if certain criteria are met.

HOW TO APPLY

To be considered for a Trustee Scholarship:

  • Submit the Common Application and all required materials for admission to one of the undergraduate degree programs at BU by December 1.
  • Complete the Trustee Scholarship essays on the Common Application as part of your application to BU.

The Trustee Scholarship Essay:

BU Trustee Scholars are encouraged to develop well-informed and well-reasoned views of important political, social, and artistic issues. We select students who have a sense of how to present persuasive arguments in support of their views. Below are the questions you may choose from to write your essay, in 600 words or less, and submit through the Common Application.

  1. The list of works banned throughout history is long and sometimes surprising. Examples include the Bible, King Lear, The Origin of Species, Mein Kampf, Lolita, The Diary of Anne Frank, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Isaac Asimov wrote: “Any book worth banning is a book worth reading.” Do you agree? Is such censorship ever justified? If so, who or what should determine which books are read and which are forbidden?
  2. Economists describe a “moral hazard” as individuals’ tendency to take greater risks when they believe that they will not bear the full cost of their actions. Some may be less careful driving, for instance, if they know that their insurance provider will cover potential accidents, while the uninsured will drive with more caution. A recent study similarly suggests a correlation between greater access to Narcan, the drug used to reverse potentially fatal opioid overdoses, and a rise in the use of opioids. In your opinion, should the concept of moral hazard affect public policy? If so, what are the relevant factors policymakers should consider in assessing questions of public safety and individual responsibility?
  3. “The perfect search engine,” Google’s co-founder Sergey Brin has said, “would be like the mind of God.” In your opinion, will science and technology eventually allow us to know all things knowable? Are there limits to what the perfect search engine will reveal, or might it indeed become like the mind of God?
In addition, please submit a short essay of no more than 300 words, to the statement below:

“Something that’s not on the resume.” Give us a glimpse of a passion, dream, or mental pursuit that absorbs and delights you.

For more information, please contact us at 617-353-2320.

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