Courses

  • SSW CP 901: Directed Study
    Directed Study. Approval of instructor needed.
  • SSW ET 753: Ethics and the Social Work Profession
    This required seminar is intended to inspire the moral imagination of social work students, and prepare them for competent and compassionate ethical practice as professionals. Ethics and the Social Work Profession (ET 753), examines the issues of social work professionalism, the process of becoming a social work professional, the tensions inherent in the goals of social work, and the ways these interrelate to produce conflicts of values and ethics in social work practice. The course focuses on acquiring and practicing the skills of ethical decision-making, including values clarification, application of ethical theory, utilization of codes of ethics, and models of ethical analysis. Both clinical and macro aspects of social work are explored, with an emphasis on the contemporary challenges of practice in multicultural and urban settings. Issues of self-care, impairment, licensure, malpractice, whistle-blowing and other professional challenges are explored. The course is set in the advanced curriculum as an integrative capstone, designed to be concurrent with the student's final semester in the MSW program.
  • SSW FE 800: Integrative Field Seminar
    Graduate Prerequisites: Required of Charles River students in their first placement. OCP students should consult their program director.
    The focus of this seminar is professional development and the role of the social work intern in the agency. The seminar meets several times each semester. Instructor sets schedule. Attendance is required.
  • SSW FE 801: Field Education I
    Required of all students in their first semester of the first (foundation) field placement. Also required to be registered for a methods course.
  • SSW FE 802: Field Education II
    Required of all students in their second semester of the first (foundation) field placement. Also required to be registered for a methods course.
  • SSW FE 803: Field Education III
    Required of all students in their first semester of the standard second (advanced) field placement. Also required to be registered for a methods course.
  • SSW FE 804: Field Education IV
    Required of all students in their second semester of the standard second (advanced field placement). Also required to be registered for a methods course.
  • SSW FE 805: Advanced Field Placement: Non-Standard 1
    First semester of non-standard advanced placement (i.e. 12 month or modified block)
  • SSW FE 806: Advanced Field Placement: Non-Standard 2
    Second semester of non-standard advanced placement (i.e. 12 month or modified block)
  • SSW FE 807: Advanced Field Placement: Non-Standard 3
    Third semester of non-standard advanced placement (i.e. 12 month or modified block)
  • SSW FE 818: Field Ed 818
  • SSW FE 819: Field Ed 819
  • SSW FE 820: Field Ed 820
  • SSW FE 821: Field Ed 821
  • SSW FE 822: Field Ed 822
  • SSW FE 823: Field 4/2 Jan-Jan
  • SSW FE 824: Field Ed 824
  • SSW FE 825: Field Ed 825
  • SSW HB 720: Human Behavior in the Social Environment
    Graduate Prerequisites: Required of all students. Permission of SSW registrar for non-SSW students.
    This course constitutes the foundation course in the Human Behavior Department and is a prerequsite for all other courses in the HBSE sequence. The goal of the course is to enable students to develop a framework for analyzing human behavior in order to create empathic, empowering relationships with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. A select set of theories is presented to enable students to examine how individuals and communities develop and interact. We also consider how oppression, power and privilege, and culture and cultural contexts can shape individual values, beliefs, worldviews, and identities, all of which play a role in the helping process. Finally, we examine human development throughout the lifespan, considering the developmental scientific knowledge base regarding opportunities and vulnerabilities present during the different stages of the lifecycle, and the biopsychosocial and cultural factors that can influence individual development. The ability to analyze human behavior in the social environment, drawing from theoretically and empirically grounded evidence bases is essential for all forms of social work practice.
  • SSW HB 723: Adult Psychopathology
    Graduate Prerequisites: SSW HB 720 or permission of department chair.
    The goal of this course is to provide students with a framework for understanding human behavior when challenges to healthy adult functioning overwhelm coping mechanisms and resources. A biopsychosocial model of psychopathology is emphasized as we study some of the disorders classified in the DSM-5, including anxiety disorders, mood disorders, psychotic disorders, PTSD, dissociative disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, and substance abuse/addictions. Complex factors in the etiology of various disorders are considered, including genetic, neurochemical, biological, developmental, familial, sociocultural, and political variables that affect the occurrence, presentation, course, and treatment of a problem. While learning the perspective and language of the phenomenological approach outlined in the DSM-5, we also highlight weaknesses and blind spots in the traditional approach to diagnoses. In particular, we explore the impact of oppression and bias on the naming and treatment of mental disorders, including the influences of race, gender, sexual orientation, class, disability, religion, and ethnicity on the diagnostic process. Students learn to consider the DSM-5 classification system as a social construction that reveals as much about the society and its views of human behavior as it does about the clients with whom social workers have contact. While this course is not designed to focus on treatment, students have the opportunity to consider how diagnoses inform treatment and review current research on both biological and psychosocial treatments for different disorders. Finally, we seek to enhance empathic understanding of our clients experiences and the experiences of their families and loved ones, remembering that people are not their diagnoses, that what is labeled individual pathology may be an adaptive response to oppressive external circumstances, and that people who experience a breakdown in functioning demonstrate not only difficulties but also compelling strengths. This course employs lecture, large and small group discussion, case presentations, and videotapes. Clinical vignettes from instructors and class are used to illustrate mental disorders and theoretical perspectives, and make material relevant to clinical practice, particularly with urban populations