Courses

  • SAR OT 911: Practicum in Social Policy and Disability
    Graduate Prerequisites: OTD degree students only.
    This on-line graduate course engages students in the critical analysis of policy and disability theory in their major area of practice (e.g., ergonomics, medical rehabilitation, early intervention, mental health services). They must complete critical reviews of additional reading related to their specific field of application as well as a sequence of analyses of the impact of relevant policies on resource allocations, service delivery methods, and reimbursement.
  • SAR OT 915: Evaluating Clinical Theory and Research
    This course is designed to help students think critically about the ways in which theories and models are used to guide clinical practice. In particular, we will examine the distinction between models of function and disablement and theories of how change occurs as a result of intervention, as well as how these models may or may not be related. We will examine how theories and models describe or explain a phenomenon at different levels of analysis and the types of scientific evidence required to support or refute the propositions reflected in clinical models and theories. The course is limited to students in the OTD program and is offered exclusively on-line.
  • SAR OT 916: Practicum in Theory Analysis
    This course builds on OT 915: Evaluating Clinical Theory and Research. Students examine the contrasting views of mechanistic, organismic, and contextual models, and contemporary expressions of these approaches in the clinical theories. The course investigates explanatory models of change through a critical examination of the theoretical bases of intervention approaches in occupational therapy. Students examine in depth a theory relevant to their doctoral project. The course is limited to students in the OTD program who have completed OT 915. It is offered exclusively on-line.
  • SAR OT 920: Outcomes Measurement and Monitoring I: Program Evaluation
    Graduate Prerequisites: OTD degree students only.
    This on-line graduate course examines quantitative and qualitative methods developed for systematic program evaluation, providing the foundation knowledge and skills needed to complete an evaluation plan for the Doctoral Project. Examples of program evaluations from the clinical literature are examined and their applicability to programs in the student's area of clinical practice evaluated.
  • SAR OT 921: Outcomes Measurement and Monitoring II: Individual Client Monitoring
    Graduate Prerequisites: OTD degree students only.
    This on-line graduate course builds on methods introduced during the foundation courses on evidence-based practice to develop skill in the application of quantitative methods of outcome evaluation for individual clients. These methods include client surveys, performance assessments, continuous performance monitoring, and single-subject designs. The course prepares the student to identify and/or create appropriate methods to evaluate individual results for the evaluation plan for his or her Doctoral Project.
  • SAR OT 925: Capstone
    Graduate Prerequisites: OTD degree students only.
    This on-line graduate Capstone course is the final course in the post-professional OTD program. This course also includes a two-day, on-campus stay at Boston University. Students will prepare for and deliver a 45-minute presentation on their doctoral project to an invited audience from the greater Boston community. After receiving written faculty feedback from this presentation, students will formulate a written response with modifications, and/or counter-argument; and prepare a final version of the proposal that is suitable for professional dissemination.
  • SAR OT 930: Doctoral Project
    Graduate Prerequisites: OTD degree students only.
    This is an on-line graduate course in the post-professional OTD program. Concurrent with each full semester (fall, spring, summer) in the OTD program, students register for one credit of the Doctoral Project. In the fourth semester of the program, students register for 3 credits of the Doctoral Project course. The Doctoral Project is organized around the student's proposed innovation in practice. It is in the form of a series of qualifying tasks, each of which represents a critical phase of the proposal. Guidance in the doctoral project will be through a combination of three elements: Faculty advising and mentorship, peer mentorship and a.Circle of Advisors composed of a minimum of two professionals with content expertise in the doctoral project. The project outcomes include: Description of a short-coming, gap or specific need in the student's area of practice; compilation of a theoretical and evidence base to support the proposed project; description of the proposed program; evaluation plan; funding plan; dissemination plan; executive summary and Fact Sheet. (1 credit each full semester until completed, 3 credits in the final semester - a minimum of 6 credits)
  • SAR OT 940: Social, Economic & Political Factors that Influence OT Practice
    This on-line graduate case-based course examines current models of and perspectives on disability and their influence on social policy. The history of disability policy is examined as well as the ways in which social, medical, and universal models are manifest in current health and social service delivery systems in the US and other developed countries. The course also examines cultural assumptions about the nature of health, disability, and quality of life and the implications of cultural differences for practice models and methods. Students conduct a critical analysis of policy and disability theory related to OT practice (e.g., ergonomics, medical rehabilitation, early intervention, mental health services). Students complete critical reviews of additional reading related to OT practice as well as a sequence of analyses of the impact of relevant policies on resource allocations, service delivery methods, and reimbursements.
  • SAR OT 942: Health & Wellness Promotion
    This on-line graduate course focuses on occupational therapy's role in developing theory-driven and evidence-based health promotion programs. Students learn theoretical perspectives and intervention models guiding health promotion programs for an individual or groups of people, with and without disabilities, and in a variety of settings. Students will examine effective teaching strategies for learners across the life course with a range of health literacy needs, and apply effective teaching strategies to communicate health and wellness initiatives.
  • SAR OT 943: Professional Development Seminar
    This course will prepare students to develop a professional developmental plan to achieve career aspirations and a proposal for the OTD Doctoral Project. Through a series of guided self-analysis assignments students will identify academic, personal and professional strengths and create career goals. Students will review gaps or shortcomings in current occupational therapy practice and knowledge and skills to achieve their goals and develop an initial plan for the OTD Doctoral Experiential Component. The purpose of the Doctoral Experiential Component is to learn the process for creating an evidence and theory based innovative program. The Doctoral Experiential Component is organized around the student's proposed innovation in practice. The Doctoral Experiential Component includes a series of competency tasks, each of which represents a critical phase of the Doctoral Experiential Component. Guidance in the Doctoral Experiential Component is provided through a combination of three mentors: faculty advising (academic mentor), guidance by external expert (Mentor in the situation of practice), and peer mentoring (peer mentors). Students will develop peer mentoring relationships focused on their Doctoral Experiential Component in the context of this course.
  • SAR OT 990: OTD Independent Study
    Graduate Prerequisites: OTD degree students only.
    Continuation of the on-line doctoral project for OTD students who need additional semesters beyond the 6 credits of OT 930 to complete their doctoral project.
  • SAR PT 341: Preclinical Experience
    The observation experience helps students to confirm their choice of Physical Therapy as a major, better understand the profession, and gain insight into the communication, knowledge base, and technical skills that successful physical therapist clinicians demonstrate. Sign up for this no credit, P/F required course, the semester that you intend to complete the 30 hours of observation in a health care setting that provides physical therapy. Completion of the observation hours, a reflection paper and a group discussion are required to complete the experience.
  • SAR PT 490: Ind Study Pt
  • SAR PT 511: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary System I
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SARHS369 or SARHS581, & SARPT515 & SARPT520. PT students only.
    This course reviews the anatomy and physiology of the cardiopulmonary system. This course will highlight the adult and pediatric dysfunctions of the cardiopulmonary system, medical and surgical care of this patient population, and the appropriate physical therapy interventions. Emphasis is placed on patient evaluation, medical assessment, treatment planning, and the performance of the appropriate procedures. In addition, patient compliance issues, ethical and legal aspects of physical therapy care, and the health care professional's own cardiopulmonary function will be addressed. Current research will be introduced throughout the course as appropriate.
  • SAR PT 512: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary System II
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SAR PT 511.
    This course is designed to expand the student's knowledge of cardiovascular and pulmonary systems as well as cardiovascular and pulmonary physical therapy. The student will gain an in-depth understanding of physical therapy examination, intervention, and management of peripheral vascular disease, wound care, prosthetic management for amputations, and cardiopulmonary disease. Laboratory sessions will facilitate the students understanding of lecture material and provide them with hands on physical therapy skills needed to care for patients with the above disorders. Current literature will be the basis for all lecture and lab sessions.
  • SAR PT 515: Physical Therapy Examination
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SAR HS 369 or SAR HS 581.
    This course is designed to teach the process of physical therapy examination. The Nagi and ICF models of disablement will be utilized to develop a general framework for physical therapy examination across systems. The patient management model as outlined in the "Guide to PT Practice" will be introduced to provide a process for gathering information. Students will learn to identify disability level problems as well as functional limitations through patient history. Historical information will direct the examination. Analysis of functional tasks will be performed and used to develop hypotheses and direct impairment level testing. Students will learn to perform impairment level tests across systems. The process of establishing relationships between participation restrictions, activity limitations,and impairments will be introduced. The interaction of the individual, the task, and the environment will be emphasized. Students will be introduced to interventions that target task and environmental constraints. Medical terminology and methods of documentation will be incorporated.
  • SAR PT 520: Functional Anatomy
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SAR HS 369 or SAR HS 581.
    This course builds on a previous knowledge of human musculoskeletal anatomy to examine human movement. Principles of biomechanics, connective tissue behavior and muscle physiology will be integrated with joint structure and function to form the basis of understanding normal and pathological movement.
  • SAR PT 521: Musculoskeletal System I
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SAR PT 515 and SAR PT 520; PT Students only.
    This course is the first in a series of three for the musculoskeletal system. It is designed to provide the student with the necessary skills for prevention, examination, evaluation, and intervention of musculoskeletal impairments of posture and the upper extremity joints. The student will learn a systems approach to patient care. Specifically, this course will teach the student how to determine which impairments are related to specific activity limitations and participation restrictions of the individual with upper extremity disorders. It will consider upper extremity impairments throughout the life span, as well as throughout the natural history (acute through chronic) of the problem. An eclectic approach to interventions will be stressed.
  • SAR PT 522: Musculoskeletal System II
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SAR PT 521.
    This course is the second in a series of three for the musculoskeletal systems. It is designed to provide the student with the necessary skills for prevention, examination, evaluation, and intervention of musculoskeletal disorders of the lower extremities. The student will build upon the systems approach to patient care. Specifically, this course will teach the student how to determine which impairments of body function and structure are related to specific activity limitations and participation restrictions of the individual with lower extremity disorders. It will consider lower extremity disorders throughout the life span, as well as throughout the natural history (acute through chronic) of the problem. An eclectic approach to interventions will be stressed. Laboratory sessions will develop the student's skills in examination and intervention techniques to address lower extremity musculoskeletal disorders.
  • SAR PT 550: Scientific Basis of Human Movement
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SAR PT 520.
    This is a lecture course designed to present students with a comprehensive theoretical framework for evaluation and treatment that can be used regardless of the type of disease, impairment, activity limitation or participation restriction. The course is guided by the concept that in order to treat dysfunction, it is necessary to understand motor control and coordination processes. The relation between these processes and the individual's functional anatomy, biomechanics, and surrounding environment will be described. The basic systems requirements proposed by Bernstein for an adequate motor control theory will be used as a way to critique theories currently used as a basis for physical therapy, and to introduce the concepts of system constraints and of dynamical systems theory. The ways in which the constraints/dynamics approach can be incorporated into the ICF and Nagi disablement models will also be identified, and normal age-specific and disease-specific processes will be described. The manner in which this approach can provide tools for developing hypotheses on relations between impairments and function and for guiding therapeutic intervention will be identified. The results will allow the student to gain insight into how to conceptualize a holistic model of the factors that influence the patient's behavior, identify causes of problems, and learn a thought process for evaluation and treatment.