Courses

  • SAR HS 704: Issues in Delivery of Dietetic Services
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Limited to students enrolled in the graduate nutrition program.
    This series of lectures are designed to provide students with information relevant to the practice of dietetics. ADA Standards of Practice/Standards of Professional Performance, the ADA Code of Ethics, the registration exam, third-party payment, and other issues salient to the dietetics practitioner are presented and discussed. 2 credits, 1st semester
  • SAR HS 710: Graduate Field Experience: Applied Anatomy and Physiology
    Graduate Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor Required
    Practical experience in a research laboratory, clinic, community or individual setting as appropriate.
  • SAR HS 742: Nutrition and Disease Prevention: a life course approach
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SAR HS 561.
    Focuses on the etiology of major nutrition problems in the U.S. population and the role of the diet in disease prevention and treatment. Included are nutrition issues facing at-risk populations within our society, including pregnant and lactating women, infants and children, and the elderly. The role of diet in the development/prevention of cardiac disease, cancer, osteoporosis, and other chronic diseases is discussed. Students are expected to integrate a knowledge of normal physiologic changes, biochemistry, pathophysiology, metabolism, and nutrient requirements throughout the life cycle with recent advances in the field of nutrition.
  • SAR HS 750: Analysis of the Physiological Literature
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Course in biology, cell biology or physiology, and consent of instructor. Master and doctoral students only.
    In this course, peer reviewed publications in the area of physiology will be critically evaluated. Scientific ethics and the process of review and publication of physiological manuscripts will be discussed. The classes will be a mix of didactic information and group discussion. Methodological issues covered will include study design, techniques used and interpretation of research findings. Students completing this course will understand the principles underlying preparation and publication of scientific manuscripts and will be able to apply these principles as they read the scientific literature and participate in research projects related to thesis work.
  • SAR HS 775: Advanced Clinical Nutrition
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SAR HS 584.
    The role of nutrition in the treatment of acute and chronic disease will be the focus of the course. The course will begin with an introduction to understanding nutritional assessment, body composition and energy expenditure methodology and the use of these methods in clinical practice. Current research pertinent to the nutritional interventions in the treatment of disease will be discussed. The student is expected to integrate basic knowledge of physiology, biochemistry, and metabolism in the application of nutritional therapy and review of the current literature. 4 credits, 2nd semester
  • SAR HS 776: Nutritional Epidemiology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SPH BS 703 and SAR HS 551; Limited to students in the graduate nutrition program or consent of instructor.
    This course examines epidemiologic methods for investigating the role of diet in long-term health. Students learn to critically review the epidemiologic evidence relating diet, anthropometry, and physical activity to heart disease, cancer, and other chronic health conditions including obesity and diabetes. The methodological issues covered include epidemiologic study design; dietary and nutritional status assessment; issues of bias, confounding, effect modification and measurement error; and interpretation of research findings including an understanding of statistical modeling. Students participate weekly in critical reviews of published research. Students completing this course will understand the principles of epidemiology and will be able to apply them as they read the scientific literature and participate in nutrition-related research.
  • SAR HS 783: Metabolic Regulation in Clinical Nutrition
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: College-level course in biochemistry.
    Graduate Prerequisites: college-level course in biochemistry or consent of instructor.
    A review of metabolism as the basis for understanding human nutritional requirements. Metabolism of carbohydrate, protein, and fat, as well as the regulation of these processes during various physiologic states are examined. Application of these principles to current topics in both normal and therapeutic nutrition is discussed.
  • SAR HS 785: Research in Clinical Nutrition
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SPH BS 703; Limited to students enrolled in the graduate nutrition program.
    This course teaches students to prepare a mock National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grant proposal that would be used to compete for research funding. Students are challenged to define a new area of research based on a critical review of existing literature on a specific nutrition-related health topic of personal interest. Course competencies include formulation of a testable research hypothesis and selection of an appropriate research design, study population, methodology, and analysis plan. This course helps students to refine their scientific writing skills, and introduces them to budget planning and ethical issues related to research involving human subjects.
  • SAR HS 789: Theory and Practice of Clinical Counseling
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: For students enrolled in the graduate nutrition program.
    Lectures and supervised individual and group counseling experience. Focus is on appropriate skills for interviewing, stimulating behavior change, and conveying information. For students enrolled in the graduate nutrition program. 2 credits, 1st semester
  • SAR HS 791: Directed Study and Research
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Limited to students enrolled in MS in human physiology program.
    For MS students conducting research projects, including thesis work, under faculty guidance.
  • SAR HS 793: Scholarly Paper
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Limited to students enrolled in MS in human physiology program.
    For MS students writing a scholarly paper under faculty guidance.
  • SAR HS 811: Practicum: Nutrition
    Structured clinical learning experience for graduate nutrition students. Placement sites include in- and outpatient facilities, adult and pediatric hospitals, public health agencies, private agencies, newsletter agencies, and long-term care facilities. Variable credit, either semester
  • SAR HS 901: Directed Study and Research
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Limited to students enrolled in PhD in human physiology program.
    For doctoral students conducting dissertation work under the guidance of a faculty member.
  • SAR HS 905: Dissertation Research
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Limited to students enrolled in PhD in human physiology program.
    For doctoral students conducting dissertation work under guidance of faculty member.
  • SAR OT 317: Professional Preparation Seminar for Occupational Therapy
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Junior students in the BS/MSOT program only.
    Preparation for the OT graduate professional program through participation in a volunteer experience and critical discussion. Emphasis on developing independent and reflective learning, critical reasoning skills, and professional behaviors necessary for effective participation in the graduate-level curriculum. Students will examine key issues in health and disability, culture, and values as they influence occupational therapy practice. Includes both a seminar class and outside volunteer experience.
  • SAR OT 497: Independent Study
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Consent of supervising instructor
    Individually supervised study for advanced student wishing to pursue a specialized area of interest in occupational therapy. Undergraduate level.
  • SAR OT 500: Integrative Seminar I and LIFW
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MSOT students only
    This graduate course in occupational therapy is the first integrative seminar in a 4-seminar sequence designed to enhance clinical reasoning processes by integrating knowledge from previous educational and work experiences with current courses and weekly fieldwork experiences. Using problem-based case scenarios, class discussion, classroom activities, fieldwork experiences and reflective journaling this seminar focuses on learning the foundations for professional socialization, group processes, therapeutic relationships, ethical practice and other professional issues for working with persons and populations of all ages with a variety of needs for occupational therapy services. Self-directed, collaborative learning and class participation are essential aspects of this seminar.
  • SAR OT 501: Integrative Seminar II and LIFW
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: OT500, OT513, OT520, OT526, OT529, OT589; MSOT students only.
    This course is the second in a four-seminar sequence designed to develop and enhance professional reasoning processes by integrating knowledge and skills from previous educational and work experiences and from concurrent OT courses with weekly fieldwork experiences. This seminar focuses on reasoning related to theories of learning and behavior change; the assessment, intervention, and documentation process; use of theory and research evidence in practice; therapeutic rapport and communication; and other professional topics and issues as they relate to working with persons and populations of all ages in a variety of OT practice contexts. Self-directed and collaborative learning, class participation, reflective writing for application and analysis of learning, case-based learning, and ongoing development of a professional portfolio are essential aspects of this seminar.
  • SAR OT 502: Integrative Seminar III and LIFW
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: OT501, 0T524, 0T556, OT562, OT620; MSOT students only.
    This is the third course in a sequence designed to develop clinical reasoning by integrating course-related knowledge with weekly fieldwork experiences. The course uses problem-based case scenarios and fieldwork experiences to practice reasoning about evaluation and intervention for person of all ages with a variety of disabling conditions. Students apply client-centered, occupation and evidence-based practice concepts to their evaluation and intervention plans.
  • SAR OT 513: Analysis and Adaptation of Occupation
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MSOT students only
    This course introduces students to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain & Process (OTPF) 2nd edition (AOTA, 2008), an official document for the profession. Through lecture and participatory activities, students investigate the domain of and "the dynamic occupation and client-centered process used in the delivery of occupational therapy "(AOTA, pg. 626). Employing logical thinking, critical analysis, problem solving, and creativity students learn how to analyze and adapt occupations and activities. Students will be able to explain the meaning and dynamics of occupation and activity, including the interaction of areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, context(s), and client factors. Through community service projects, such as National School Backpack Awareness Day, students will articulate to consumers and the general public the value of occupation to support participation. Using small group presentations, students will gain an understanding of the importance of the history and philosophical base of occupational therapy.