Marketing

  • GSM MK 723: Marketing Management
    Graduate Prerequisites: MG700, PL727, QM716, AC710
    This course provides a practical understanding of how business strategies and tactics are driven by marketing's dual focus on customers and competition. Students will learn how to leverage marketing tools and emerging technologies in the creation (e.g., customer insight, product and service design, branding), delivery (e.g., communication and distribution), and capture (e.g., pricing, customer life time value) of marketplace value. Across business contexts including B2C, B2B, products versus services, global versus domestic markets, small/medium/large organizations, for-profit versus social enterprises, the course builds the fundamental skills involved in analyzing market challenges and opportunities and making decisions for the formulation and implementation of successful and sustainable marketing programs.
  • GSM MK 724: Marketing Management
    Graduate Prerequisites: AC710/711 taken before or concurrently
    This course provides a practical understanding of how business strategies and tactics are driven by marketing's dual focus on customers and competition. Students will learn how to leverage marketing tools and emerging technologies in the creation (e.g., customer insight, product and service design, branding), delivery (e.g., communication and distribution), and capture (e.g., pricing, customer life time value) of marketplace value. Across business contexts including B2C, B2B, products versus services, global versus domestic markets, small/medium/large organizations, for-profit versus social enterprises, the course builds the fundamental skills involved in analyzing market challenges and opportunities and making decisions for the formulation and implementation of successful and sustainable marketing programs.
  • GSM MK 845: Social Media Marketing
    Graduate Prerequisites: MK723/724
    Social media technologies are continuously transforming the ways consumers interact with each other and firms. These changes constitute a fundamental shift in the marketplace--consumers have greater opportunities to voice their opinions and connect with other consumers as well as increased influence over marketers and brands. In this course, we examine how organizations capitalize on social media and these consumer-to-consumer interactions to support their marketing efforts. Specifically, we'll examine (a) how social media can be used to listen to consumers and monitor their behavior; (b) developing and delivering content that engages consumers; and (c) how to track the effectiveness of these efforts. Finally, we'll explore how to manage both the internal and external dimensions of social media engagement. We view these issues from a strategic and a practical perspective, rather than a technical or platform perspective. We examine these topics using a hands-on approach, including live cases, personal engagement in social media, and a team project.
  • GSM MK 852: Marketing Analytics
    Graduate Prerequisites: MK723/724, QM716/717
    This course will focus on developing marketing strategies driven by marketing analytics. Topics covered include market segmentation, targeting, and positioning, new product test marketing, market response models, customer profitability, social media, and marketing resource allocation. The course will draw on and extend students' understanding of issues related to quantitative analysis and principles of marketing. The course will use a combination of cases, lectures, simulations, and a hands-on project to develop these skills.
  • GSM MK 853: Global Strategic Marketing
    Graduate Prerequisites: MK723/724
    This course focuses on the key strategic marketing decisions managers must make: deciding whether to market globally; selecting countries in which to market; choosing marketing strategies and tactics for entry and growth; and organizing for and managing the implementation of global marketing strategies.
  • GSM MK 854: Branding
    Graduate Prerequisites: MK723/724
    This is a course about branding, and the ways that brands acquire and sustain value in the marketplace. Cases, readings, in-class discussions, and team/individual assignments are designed to provide: An appreciation of the strategic discipline of branding and its role in creating shareholder value; an understanding of brands as co-creations of consumers, marketers, and cultures, and brand management as a collaborative process of meaning management; a sound foundation in consumer-brand behavior to inform brand decisions; and a capacity to think creatively and precisely about the strategies and tactics involved in building, leveraging, defending, and sustaining strong brands. Select topics may include brand equity, brand (re)positioning, brand relationships, brand loyalty, brand community, open source branding, branded entertainment and other cultural branding strategies, internal branding, brand architecture design and portfolio strategy, brand leverage and extensions, brand metrics, crisis management, and brand stewardship. A team-based brand planning project or series of data-driven applications weaves content throughout the course and, when possible, involves a live client problem. Guest speakers from branding services, consulting, and practice provide insights throughout the course. While this course has obvious relevance for those contemplating brand management careers in product or service markets, it is appropriate for a range of future professionals within for-profit and not-for-profit C2C and B2B worlds, and others who share a simple passion for branding.
  • GSM MK 856: Consumer Behavior
    Graduate Prerequisites: MK723/724
    Marketing, in particular, begins and ends with the consumer -- from determining consumer needs to ensuring customer satisfaction. In this course, we will explore the most recent scientific research in marketing, psychology, and behavioral economics related to consumer behavior. We will develop your ability to understand and influence what people want, how people decide what and when to buy, and whether people will be satisfied or dissatisfied with their decisions. These psychological insights are particularly useful for marketing strategy, brand positioning, and marketing communication decisions, but also yield insight into common biases in judgment and decision making, beyond marketing, to which you would otherwise fall prey. Why people are willing to drive across town to save $5 on a tank of gasoline, for example, when they would not drive a minute to save $5 on a refrigerator. We will discuss some of these applications in class. In addition, we will examine the methodology of market research (specific to consumer behavior) to build the tools you will need to interpret and base decisions on it. Readings will include primary empirical research articles (e.g., Journal of Consumer Research articles), business journal articles, and research reviews (e.g., Harvard Business Review articles). The course includes lecture, discussion, an exam, and a team term project.
  • GSM MK 857: Services Marketing and Management
    Graduate Prerequisites: MK723/724
    This course concentrates on the role of marketing in managing services. Services have the fastest job growth of any sector in the U.S. with similar growth rates in other developed countries. The strategic application of marketing requires cross-functional integration; this is particularly true when one speaks about the marketing of services. You should expect to be addressing human resource, information management, operational, and financial overlaps with marketing throughout the course. The strategic focus includes leadership and culture, management of supplementary vs. core services, service communities, positioning and contrary positioning (breaking industry traditions), service failures (customer defection, employee cycle of failure, and customer apartheid. The primary course assignment is an end-of-semester service analysis and recommendation paper; students are encouraged to analyze a company or SBU where they would like to work in the future. This paper has served as an entryway to a desired job for students in the past.
  • GSM MK 859: Business Marketing
    Graduate Prerequisites: MK723/724
    This course provides an in-depth understanding of the unique aspects of marketing in a business-to-business environment. Students apply current marketing theory and techniques to industrial market settings. In addition, they develop managerial skills in the marketing planning and execution process, as well as critical analysis and problem-solving abilities with respect to marketing working relationships. The course allows participants to experiment with and apply strategic marketing concepts in a complex industrial marketing environment. Topics covered include the dynamics of relationships between suppliers and customers, the increasing reliance on the marketing-/R&D interface, the structuring of alliances between so-called competitors, and the process of negotiations - to better understand how organizations endeavor to become and stay market-oriented. The course has some guest speakers and an interactive marketing simulation.
  • GSM MK 862: Marketing High-Tech Products
    Graduate Prerequisites: MK723/724
    This course provides you with a good understanding of how marketing works in a high-tech context. When it comes to marketing, there are five important characteristics that make high-tech offerings (products and services) special: technological uncertainty, customer uncertainty, competitor volatility, high- tech offerings are often used not singly but in larger overall systems, and high-tech offerings often exhibit network externalities. These five characteristics have a big impact on the type of challenges, analysis, and marketing decisions made in high-tech industries. The overall purpose of this course is to impart concepts, tools, and frameworks that you can apply as you pursue careers as marketers of high-tech offerings, consultants, investment bankers, and service professionals. The key objectives of the course are to: Understand the special challenges involved in marketing high-tech products Learn how to analyze high-tech marketing problems which involve significant customer, market, and technological uncertainties; Examine approaches to improve the market orientation of, and the marketing-R&D interface in, high-tech companies; Understand the impact of diffusion of technology and adoption of innovation on targeting and segmentation decisions; Explore the effect of complementary products, databases, and systems on product and pricing decisions; Identify the challenges and drivers of success at different stages in a technology's life- cycle; and, Understand the concept of value networks and the role of complementors, partners, and competitors in high-tech industries.
  • GSM MK 864: Pricing Strategy and Tactics
    Graduate Prerequisites: MK723/724, PL727/FE730, QM716/717
    This course focuses on the practical needs of the marketing manager making pricing decisions. Students learn the techniques of strategic analysis necessary to price more profitably by evaluating the price sensitivity of buyers, determining relevant costs, anticipating and influencing competitors' pricing and formulating an appropriate pricing strategy.
  • GSM MK 867: Marketing Social Change
    Graduate Prerequisites: MK723/724
    Globalization, increasing transparency in business operations and the prevalence of social media have forever changed the way stakeholders view and interact with organizations. Societal and business imperatives are not only often considered compatible; they can be increasingly viewed as one and the same. People today often communicate, organize and engage based on mutual interests, and, generally, place greater trust in organizations and individuals that work for a better world. Marketing has often been referred to as the "science of sales." Whether you are selling a product, an intervention or an idea, it can be a powerful tool for advancing social change in today's dynamic environment. The strategic integration of a relevant social purpose into a product, business or nonprofit organization through brand-building citizenship activities can drive consumer and donor recall, consideration, acquisition, retention and propensity to recommend. However, these efforts do not usually constitute a "silver bullet" and may not be the best solution to a business problem or societal need at all. In the worst cases, ill-conceived citizenship marketing strategies can result in damaging consequences. Practitioners must be pragmatic when engaging in marketing social change. Understanding how to apply best practice, identify opportunities, address challenges, engage stakeholders and innovate strategically are essential skills in this rapidly evolving sector. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an in-depth understanding of how marketing principles can be applied to create both short-term and lasting social change. Students will explore dimensions of the modern landscapes of brand, corporate and nonprofit "citizenship" and how they relate to marketing. Areas of study include: cause-related marketing and cause branding; nonprofit branding and social movements, as well as corporate social responsibility and shared value creation.
  • GSM MK 898: Ds: Marketing
  • GSM MK 914: Seminar in Consumer Behavior
    This course is designed to familiarize students with the current major theoretical streams of research in consumer behavior. It is meant to instill in the student not only a knowledge of the current "state of the art" in consumer behavior research, but also an ability to apply behavioral science theory to consumer behavior research issues. It is expected that students will develop and refine the ability both to critically evaluate the theoretical contribution of articles in consumer behavior and to formulate theory-based hypotheses capable of advancing the discipline's understanding of consumer behavior.
  • GSM MK 998: Ds: Marketing
  • GSM MK 999: Ds: Marketing
  • SMG MK 323: Marketing Management
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SMG FE 101 or SMG SM121/122 or SMG SM299; SMG AC222; SMG OB221; SMG SM151; SMG SM222
    Component of SMG SM 323, The Cross Functional Core. Introduces students to the field of marketing management: analysis, planning and implementation of marketing strategies as the means for achieving an organization's objectives. Students analyze cases and participate in workshops that focus on key marketing management tasks: marketing research, consumer behavior, segmentation and targeting, sales forecasting, product and brand management, distribution channels, pricing, and promotion and advertising strategies. A semester-long business plan project explores the interactions and the cross functional integrations between marketing, operations, information systems, and finance. 4 cr.
  • SMG MK 435: Introduction to the Music Business and Music Marketing
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SMG MK 323.
    Survey of the music industry with a focus on understanding of its structure and the intersection of business and music. Discusses key areas of music marketing, including opportunities for musicians, including publicity, advertising, promotion (online and traditional), digital distribution, touring, licensing/synch, and radio.
  • SMG MK 445: Consumer Behavior
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SMG MK 323.
    Provides insight into the motivations, influences, and processes underlying consumption behavior. Considers relevant behavioral science theories/frameworks and their usefulness in formulating and evaluating marketing strategies (i.e., segmentation, positioning, product development, pricing, communications).
  • SMG MK 447: Marketing Research
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: SMG MK 323.
    Required for Marketing concentrators. Introduces tools and techniques of marketing research as an aid to marketing decision making. Definition of research problems, selection of research methodologies, design of research projects, interpretation of research results, and translation of research results into action.