Intermediate Composition

MET EN 201

Does not give concentration credit. Practice in writing narration, exposition, argument and persuasion, the critical essay, and the research paper. Related readings. Class discussion of papers. Individual conferences. Students enroll in specific seminars. Limited enrollment.

MET EN201 -- Section Descriptions for Fall 2015

Section A1 -- Bennett - "Multiethnic American Literature":
This course examines the psychological, political, sociological, and religious concerns of "ethnic" individuals in the United States in the twenty- and twenty-first centuries and what it means to be an "American." We will carefully define "ethnicity" in various literary texts including a novel, "graphic" books of cartoons, short stories, and poems. We will explore works by Native Americans, African Americans, Latin Americans, Jewish Americans, and Asian Americans. We will read Art Spiegelman's 'Maus' (Volumes 1 and 2), John Okada's 'No-No Boy', Junot Díaz's 'Drown', Sherman Alexie's 'The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven', African American stories, and Arab American poetry. We will discuss the relationship between the humor in these texts and the pain described by many of their authors.

Section C1 -- Grabianowski - "Technology, Ideology, and Society":
Is it possible to create a sustainable and livable world where equality and human rights are respected? What, if any, role do science and technology play in creating such a world? In this section of English 201, we will first consider how 19th and 20th century writers like Nathaniel Hawthorne, Walt Whitman, and Aldo Leopold have addressed the practical and ethical issues that arise out of the intersection of technology, nature, and society. We will then explore through topics like sustainable business models, ecological economics, big data, agribusiness, and genetics how contemporary scientists, technology industry leaders, and writers like Jacob Bronowski, Bill Joy, Michael Pollan, and Herman Daly continue to grapple with the rapid transformation of our technological existence. EN 201, Sec. D1 -- Jackson The Sixties This course examines the 1960s, a tumultuous decade of political, social, and cultural change in the United States, through a range of readings that include poems, song lyrics, manifestos, autobiographies, speeches, essays, stories, and the "non-fiction novel." The major movements of the era (anti-war, civil rights, feminist, environmental, sexual liberation, and expanded consciousness) constituted a wide- ranging revolution. Literary critic Fredric Jameson characterizes the period with "the widely shared feeling that in the 60s, for a time, everything was possible: that this period, in other words, was a moment of a universal liberation, a global unbinding of energies." Some of the key players and events were in and around Boston (Martin Luther King, Jr. living in Myles Standish Hall, Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton meeting Robert Lowell at the other end of Bay State Road, Huston Smith expanding consciousness in Marsh Chapel, Malcolm X learning of the Black Muslims in Charlestown, Concord, and Norfolk prisons). We will read these writers as well as others including James Baldwin, Adrienne Rich, Bob Dylan, and Rachel Carson. We will write about what these writers meant in their time and about the reverberations and reactions that continue to affect how we live today.

FALL 2015 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
A1 Bennett CAS B25A M 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or MET-approved
equivalent.

FALL 2015 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
C1 Grabianowski CAS 204B W 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or MET-approved
equivalent.

FALL 2015 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
D1 Jackson CAS 114B R 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or MET-approved
equivalent.

Note that this information may change at any time. Please visit the Student Link for the most up-to-date course information.