Intermediate Composition

MET EN 201

Does not give concentration credit. Practice in writing narration, exposition, argument and persuasion, the critical essay, and the research paper. Related readings. Class discussion of papers. Individual conferences. Students enroll in specific seminars. Limited enrollment.

MET EN201 -- Section Descriptions for Fall 2014

MET EN201 A1 -- "Multiethnic American Literature" (Bennett):
This course examines the psychological, political, sociological, and religious concerns of "ethnic" individuals in the United States in the twenty- and twenty-first centuries and what it means to be an "American." We will carefully define "ethnicity" in various literary texts including a novel, "graphic" books of cartoons, short stories, and poems. We will explore works by Native Americans, African Americans, Latin Americans, Jewish Americans, and Asian Americans. We will read Art Spiegelman's 'Maus' (Volumes 1 and 2), John Okada's 'No-No Boy', Junot Díaz's 'Drown', Sherman Alexie's 'The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven', African American stories, and Arab American poetry. The humor in a number of these texts counters the pain described by many of the writers.

MET EN201 C1 -- "Technology, Ideology and Society" (Grabianowski):
Is it possible to create a sustainable and livable world where equality and human rights are respected? What, if any, roles do science and technology play in creating such a world? In this section of English 201, we will first consider how 19th and 20th century writers like Nathaniel Hawthorne, Walt Whitman and Aldo Leopold have addressed the practical and ethical issues that arise out of the intersection of technology, nature and society. We will then explore through topics like sustainable business models, ecological economics, big data, agribusiness and genetics how contemporary scientists, technology industry leaders, and writers like Jacob Bronowski, Bill Joy, Michael Pollan and Herman Daly continue to grapple with the rapid transformation of our technological existence.

MET EN201 D1 -- "The Lost Generation" (Jackson):
This class explores the writers of the Lost Generation, American expatriates in Europe in the 1920's and 1930's. These include some of the most important and most popular of all American writers. The readings include Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, and F. Scott Fitzgerald's Tender Is the Night. Our research will examine these works in the contexts of World War I, growing social and political revolutions, changes in the roles of men and women, the psychologies of both Freud and "shell-shock," contrasts between Europe and America, the economics of a stock market boom and the Great Depression, and the challenges of Modernism in art.

FALL 2014 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
A1 Barents CAS B27 M 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or approved
equivalent. See
section
descriptions.
Class Full

FALL 2014 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
C1 Grabianowski CAS 204B W 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or approved
equivalent. See
section
descriptions.

FALL 2014 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
D1 Jackson CAS 114A R 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or approved
equivalent. See
section
descriptions.

SPRG 2015 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
A1 Barents CAS 114A M 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or equivalent.
Class Full

SPRG 2015 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
C1 Grabianowski CAS 114A W 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or equivalent
Class Full

SPRG 2015 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
D1 Jackson CAS 320 R 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or equivalent.
Class Full

Note that this information may change at any time. Please visit the Student Link for the most up-to-date course information.