Intermediate Composition

MET EN 201

Does not give concentration credit. Practice in writing narration, exposition, argument and persuasion, the critical essay, and the research paper. Related readings. Class discussion of papers. Individual conferences. Students enroll in specific seminars. Limited enrollment.

MET EN201 -- Section Descriptions for Fall 2016

Section A1 -- Pasto - " Science, Witchcraft, and Magic":
People throughout the world believe that they can harness invisible, "supernatural" powers to bring about desired -- harmful and beneficial -- effects. Science, however, says that these invisible forces do not exist and that the effects are either imaginary or psychosomatic. This course will explore beliefs in witchcraft and magic and how they measure up to science. The course will include study of events such as the Salem witchcraft outbreak, contemporary witchcraft beliefs in Europe, Asia, and Africa, popular beliefs in the evil eye, dreams, numerology, etc., and Wiccan beliefs and practices. Students will read shorter and longer works, watch films, and conduct research.

Section A2 -- Bennett - "Literature of the African Diaspora":
This course explores 20th- and 21st-century (mostly) anglophone black novelists hailing from Africa, Europe, and North America. It examines issues including, but not limited to, identity, place, gender, nationality, Pan-Africanism, race, and class and evaluates both positive and negative diasporic experiences. The novels (and novella) include Joseph Conrad's The Heart of Darkness, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Americanah, Toni Morrison's Beloved, and Junot Díaz's The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

Section C1 -- Grabianowski - "Technology, Ideology and Society":
Is it possible to create a sustainable and livable world where equality and human rights are respected? What roles do science and technology play in creating such a world? How can thinking about our experiences in the natural landscape help us to think about our experiences in the technological landscape? In this section of English 201, we will first consider how 19th and 20th century writers like Nathaniel Hawthorne, William Wordsworth, E.M. Forster, Aldo Leopold and David Bohm have addressed the practical and ethical issues that arise out of the intersection of technology, nature and society. We will then explore through topics like sustainable business models, ecological economics, agribusiness, big data, wild writing, hyperobjects, genetics and robotics how contemporary scientists, poets, technology industry leaders, and writers like Arnold Pacey, Timothy Morton, Neil Postman, Michael Pollan, Herman Daly and Sherry Turkle continue to grapple with the rapid transformation of our technological existence.

Section D1 -- Jackson - "The Sixties":
This course examines the 1960s, a tumultuous decade of political, social, and cultural change in the United States, through a range of readings that include poems, song lyrics, manifestos, autobiographies, speeches, essays, stories, and the "non- fiction novel." The major movements of the era (anti-war, civil rights, feminist, environmental, sexual liberation, and expanded consciousness) constituted a wide-ranging revolution. Literary critic Fredric Jameson characterizes the period with "the widely shared feeling that in the 60s, for a time, everything was possible: that this period, in other words, was a moment of a universal liberation, a global unbinding of energies." Some of the key players and events were in and around Boston (Martin Luther King, Jr. living in Myles Standish Hall, Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton meeting Robert Lowell at the other end of Bay State Road, Huston Smith expanding consciousness in Marsh Chapel, Malcolm X growing up in Roxbury). We will read these writers as well as others including Rosa Parks, Betty Friedan, Bob Dylan, and Rachel Carson. We will write about what these writers meant in their time and about the reverberations and reactions that continue to affect how we live today.

FALL 2016 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
A1 CAS 114A M 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or MET-approved
equivalent.

FALL 2016 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
A2 CAS 204B M 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or MET-approved
equivalent.

FALL 2016 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
C1 CAS 204B W 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or MET-approved
equivalent.

FALL 2016 Schedule

Section Instructor Location Schedule Notes
D1 CAS 114B R 6:00 pm-9:00 pm Prereq: EN104
or MET-approved
equivalent.

Note that this information may change at any time. Please visit the Student Link for the most up-to-date course information.