City Planning

  • MET UA 759: Financing Historic Preservation
    This course will focus on how to determine the value and potential income of a property, produce a feasibility analysis, and secure financing for preservation projects.
  • MET UA 761: Planning Thesis
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: approval of program director.
    Graduate Prerequisites: approval of program director.
    Topic must be approved by designated instructor or advisor. For M.C.P. students only. Application of program coursework and independent research to a selected topic individually arranged.
  • MET UA 801: Graduate Directed Study in Urban Affairs and Planning
    Limited to a maximum of 8 credits toward the degree requirements. Approval by program director required prior to registration. Study of urban and public affairs and planning individually arranged between student and instructor to provide training opportunities not available elsewhere.
  • MET UA 802: Graduate Directed Study in Urban Affairs and Planning
    Limited to a maximum of 8 credits toward the degree requirements. Approval by program director required prior to registration. Study of urban and public affairs and planning individually arranged between student and instructor to provide training opportunities not available elsewhere.
  • MET UA 804: Supervised Fieldwork
    Limited to a maximum of four credits toward the degree requirements. Approval by program director required prior to registration. Students spend a minimum of 12 hours working with public agencies, community groups, or private organizations. Seminar participation.
  • MET UA 805: The Boston Urban Symposium
    The Boston based Urban Symposium will be a thematic Spring symposium, required for students in the Urban Affairs and City Planning programs. The class meetings will weave together the interdisciplinary nature of the urban planning and city planning professions. While the symposium topics will change each spring, professionals and industry leaders will be invited to lecture on their experiences, contemporary challenges to the professions, and major problems confronting the public and private sectors. Recognizing the unique and diverse characteristics of the Boston urban environment, the symposium themes will be drawn from topical issues that involve the greater Boston metropolitan area. The course features a combination of guest speakers and academic case studies that emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of urban planning.