Courses

  • MET PS 371: Abnormal Psychology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET PS 251.
    Explores the complex causes, manifestations, and treatment of common behavior disorders. Introduces abnormal behavior in the context of psychological well being to show these behaviors along a continuum from functional to dysfunctional. Interviews with patients and analysis by therapists and other mental health professionals provide students with invaluable perspectives on the suffering of behavioral disorders as well as the multiple approaches to treatment.
  • MET PS 401: Psychological Perspectives on Self and Identity
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET PS 101.
    This course explores the manifold ways in which the sense of "who one is" as a person is approached and understood within the field of psychology. The psychological construct of identity will be utilized to survey the varying ways in which the experience and nature of "one's own sense of self" is examined and elucidated across the major sub-fields of psychology, including: developmental psychology; personality psychology, abnormal psychology, humanistic, existential and transpersonal psychology; and the psychology of religion. Particular consideration will be given to the significance of such cultural and contextual factors as race, ethnicity and gender.
  • MET PS 404: Senior Seminar in Psychology and Culture
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: three courses in psychology.
    This class addresses the key role culture plays in shaping the human experience. Emphasis will be put on key social, affective, and cognitive aspects of group identity and self-identity development. The historical role psychology has played in understanding these phenomena will be reviewed. Topics that will be covered include: cross cultural communication and the constant evolution of prejudice and racism in today's world. The course is taught in seminar format and requires intensive student motivation and participation.
  • MET PS 472: Psychology of Women
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: three psychology courses or consent of instructor.
    This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the myriad factors influencing the development of girls and women in a variety of cultures and societies. Topics that will be covered include feminist scholarship and research; gender socialization, women's biology, and health; sexuality, relationships and family; and work, career, and power issues.
  • MET PS 497: Health Psychology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Three courses in Psychology
    Health Psychology is the branch of psychological science that deals with identifying and understanding factors that help enhance human health and prevent disease. Through education, research, and treatment, health psychologists intervene in a wide variety of clinical conditions, including addictions, chronic illnesses, cardiovascular diseases, pain management and many others.
  • MET PS 515: Introduction to Forensic Psychology: Methods, Practice, and Theory
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET PS 371.
    The field of forensic psychology lies at the crossroads of psychology, the law, and the criminal justice system. This course presents upper-level undergraduates and master's level graduate students with the scope of forensic psychology practice and research. First, the course focuses on the scope of the field: what forensic psychologists do, the ethical conflicts they encounter, and the field's special methodology (e.g., assessment of malingering and deception). The use and function of expert witness testimony is reviewed and critically evaluated. A range of civil and criminal psychological issues is addressed including eyewitness memory, sexual offenders and battered women.
  • MET PS 592: Positive Psychology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET PS 101.
    Positive Psychology is the scientific study of what makes it possible for human beings to lead happy, meaningful and productive lives--sometimes despite formidable odds. This course offers an introduction to the discipline's methods, empirical findings and theory.
  • MET PY 105: Elementary Physics (N)
    Assumes a knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. Satisfies premedical requirements. Principles of classical and modern physics: mechanics, heat, light, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics. Fundamental concepts of energy; conservation laws, energy sources, and transformations. Lectures, discussions, and laboratory.
  • MET PY 106: Elementary Physics (N)
    Assumes a knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. Satisfies premedical requirements. Principles of classical and modern physics: mechanics, heat, light, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics. Fundamental concepts of energy; conservation laws, energy sources, and transformations. Lectures, discussions, and laboratory.
  • MET PY 211: General Physics (N)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET MA 124 or MET MA 123; MET MA 124, or MA 123 with consent of instructor. For premedical students desiring a more analytical course than MET PY 105, PY 106, and for science concentrators who require a one-year physics course.
    For premedical students desiring a more analytical course than MET PY 105, PY 106, and for science concentrators who require a one-year physics course. Basic principles of physics, emphasizing topics from mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Lectures, discussions, and laboratory.
  • MET PY 212: General Physics (N)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET MA 124 or MET MA 123; MET MA 124, or MA 123 with consent of instructor. For premedical students desiring a more analytical course than MET PY 105, PY 106, and for science concentrators who require a one-year physics course.
    For premedical students desiring a more analytical course than MET PY 105, PY 106, and for science concentrators who require a one-year physics course. Basic principles of physics, emphasizing topics from mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Lectures, discussions, and laboratory.
  • MET RN 100: Introduction to Religion
    Religion matters. It makes meaning and provides structure to life, addressing fundamental questions about body, spirit, community, and time. But what is it? How does it work in our world? This course explores religion in ritual, philosophical, experiential, and ethical dimensions. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • MET RN 103: Religions of the World: Eastern
    Study of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. Focus on the world view of each tradition and the historical development of that world view.
  • MET RN 104: World Religion West
    Study of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Introduction to development, thought, practices and leaders of these religions.
  • MET RN 211: Chinese Religion
    A historical survey of Chinese religion that explores the diversity and unity of Chinese traditions. Covers ancient mythology, cosmology, shamanism; Confucianism and the traditional state cult, Taoist mysticism, and immortality; Buddhism and Chinese religious transformation.
  • MET RN 212: Christianity
    This course critically explores Christianity in its multifaceted fronts. Aiming to bring fresh perspectives and advance a deeper understanding of Christianity, the course will delve into the important questions on God, humanity and the world in Christian traditions. Explore the problem of God, evil, and suffering; visualize God and spatialize sacred space in Christianity; explore images of women in Christianity and encounter women in Christianity beyond Maria and Eve; learn Christianities beyond the West and how Christianity is transformed when it meets indigenous cultures; explore interreligious dialogue and Christianity?s self understanding in relation to other religions. In addition to the classical and contemporary texts by Christian thinkers, students will be encouraged to explore films or other forms of culture to enhance their understanding of Christianity. This course does not assume any personal or theoretical knowledge of Christianity.
  • MET RN 220: The Holy City: Jerusalem in Time, Space and Imagination
    Historical development of Jerusalem and its symbolic meanings in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions, from the Bronze Age to the 21st century.
  • MET SO 100: Principles of Sociology
    This course introduces students to the basic theories and concepts associated with the study of society. Within this framework students will explore the following questions: Why are people poor? What are the dynamics of group behavior? Has modern society lost its traditional values? Do men and women think differently? What is environmental racism? What explains the achievement gap in American education? These questions and more will be discussed and analyzed through a sociological lens.
  • MET SO 201: Sociological Methods
    Scientific method, measurement, experimentation, survey research, observational methods, projective techniques, and content analysis used in social science research.
  • MET SO 203: Sociological Theories
    An introduction to the major theoretical perspectives used in sociological inquiry and how they apply to contemporary social life. Special emphasis on nineteenth-century European theorists such as Marx, Weber, and Durkheim.