Courses

  • GMS BT 520: Biology of Cancer
    Prereq: BT 405 (Biochem) and BT 413 (Mol Bio) or consent of program director. This course focuses on the cellular and molecular changes that underlie the development and progression of human cancer. Students examine the pathways and processes that involve oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes to understand how they can contribute to cancer. Complex interactions including angiogenesis, tumor immunology, invasion and metastasis are studied as well. In addition,the course covers targeted approaches to cancer therapy and the latest scientific research including cancer epigenetics, microRNAs and cancer stem cells.
  • GMS BT 530: Introductory Pharmacology
    Prereq: one semester, biology and 2 semesters of chemistry, BT405 recommended. This course introduces the basic principles of pharmacology and several major classes of therapeutic agents, with attention to their mechanisms of action. Issues of current and future directions in pharmacology are addressed including the source of information about pharmacologic agents, the ethics of human experimentation, the drug development process, and new biotechnological approaches to drug design. 
  • GMS BT 532: Histopathology
    Prereq: BT 104 (Med Term) and BT 342 (Cell Bio), or consent of program director. The goal of the course is to give students a fundamental knowledge and practical experience of human histology, pathology and the techniques used to study cells and tissues in the normal and diseased state. This course familiarizes students with biospecimen processing and management at the organ, tissue, cellular and molecular levels. By studying different organs and organ systems, including: gastrointestinal, breast, respiratory, neuro-muscular, skin, brain, kidney and liver, students develop an understanding of the normal and diseased state at the macro and microscopic levels. Furthermore, the course provides hands-on experience, including: dissection, preservation, processing, microtomy, photomicroscopy, macro-photography, electron microscopy, and archiving. Students apply their understanding of medical terminology and cell biology. This course can help prepare a student for graduate work in pathology, for a Pathologists' Assistant program or for a career as a histotechnologists in a diagnostic or research laboratory.  Laboratory course.
  • GMS BT 540: Regulatory and Compliance Issues
    This course explains the regulatory requirements for health care products: drugs, biologics, diagnostics, and devices. The focus is on U.S. FDA regulations and their impact on product development and marketing with international requirements. Recommended for students in clinical research concentration. 
  • GMS BT 550: Clinical Data Management
    Introduces students to the technology, process, and responsibilities of clinical data management. Students examine study setup, case report form (CRF) design, and the data life cycle, including data collection, data validation, coding of adverse events using standard dictionaries (such as ICD-9 or MedDRA), data review, and database lock. Data Management SOP's are discussed within this context. An industry-leading clinical data management system (CDMS) is utilized. Students also explore how new technologies, such as electronic data capture (EDC), affect these processes.
  • GMS BT 560: Good Clinical Practices (GCP) in Clinical Research
    This course introduces the regulatory responsibilities of sponsors, monitors, and investigators conducting clinical trials. Practical information and exercises are designed for the clinical trial professional on procedures for ensuring GCP compliance from an industry perspective. Topics include identifying and selecting qualified investigators, obtaining ethical approval to enroll patients, and initiating sites successfully. The course also covers issues related to collecting required regulatory documentation, verifying high quality data, maintaining study materials accountability, and reporting serious adverse events. Group discussions and guest speakers help students learn the practical skills used in the field.
  • GMS BT 575: Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials
    Prereq: knowledge of biostatistics. This course covers basic principles and current methodologies used in the design and responsible conduct of clinical trials. Topics include statistical design of clinical trials, sample selection, data collection and management, patient recruitment strategies, adverse event reporting, and compliance monitoring. Practical exercises include writing clinical research protocols and informed consent forms, and designing case report forms.
  • GMS BT 580: Legal and Ethical Issues in Clinical Research
    This course examines the development and implementation of regulatory as well as ethical issues involved with conducting clinical trials. Topics include: use of human subjects, privacy and confidentiality, conflicts of interest, use of stem cells in research, federal laws affecting laboratories, and genetic testing of gene and therapy trials. Students also participate in discussions on landmark legal cases affecting laboratory scientists.
  • GMS BT 591: Biomedical Externship
    for Fall and Summer 1 semesters. Directed study for degree candidates only. Prereq: Consent of program director. The externship is the capstone project of the Bachelor of Science degree in the BLCS program. The externship objectives are for students to apply knowledge gained from coursework, learn new and challenging biomedical skills and procedures, and understand the purpose for performing these. In addition, students are expected to articulate the goals of their project and how their project fits within the overall mission of the host institution or department. Students also need to demonstrate initiative and curiosity, and be proactive in researching and learning the science behind their project.
  • GMS BT 592: Biomedical Externship
    for Spring and Summer 2 semesters. Directed study for degree candidates only. Prereq: Consent of program director. The externship is the capstone project of the Bachelor of Science degree in the BLCS program. The externship objectives are for students to apply knowledge gained from coursework, learn new and challenging biomedical skills and procedures, and understand the purpose for performing these. In addition, students are expected to articulate the goals of their project and how their project fits within the overall mission of the host institution or department. Students also need to demonstrate initiative and curiosity, and be proactive in researching and learning the science behind their project.
  • GMS BT 594: Clinical Research Practicum
    for Fall and Summer 1 semesters. Prereq: 16 credits in clinical research and permission of program director. Directed study offering direct experience with the conduct of a clinical trial. Student will work on a supervised project within an approved clinical research site.
  • GMS BT 595: Clinical Research Practicum
    for Spring and Summer 2 semesters. Prereq: 16 credits in clinical research and permission of program director. Directed study offering direct experience with the conduct of a clinical trial. Student will work on a supervised project within an approved clinical research site.
  • MET AD 501: Business Communication for International Students
    Techniques for effective written and verbal communications. This course is a special offering for students for whom English is a second language. Departmental approval required for non-MSAS students. Prerequisite course: credits can not be used toward the MSAS degree.
  • MET AD 510: Mathematics for Management
    Provides and overview of fundamental mathematical concepts, with emphasis on the solution of word problems. Topics covered include quadratic equations, signed numbers, polynomials, graphs, roots and radicals, and basic concepts of differential and integral calculus. Prerequisite course which may not be used for credit toward the MSAS degree.
  • MET AD 555: International Commerce Regional Field Experience
    Enhances the theoretical regional business course (750 series) for a specific commerce area of the world. Course offers on-site experience exposing students to the region's geopolitical and cultural environment. Also examines business activities through lectures and tours of company and government locations as well as cultural activities.
  • MET AD 600: Economic Development and Tourism Management
    Provides a market oriented, strategic planning framework to address a broad range of tourism and regional economic and development issues that relate to tourism industry development and growth. The interplay of private, public and government organizations is discuss as they relate to the development of a comprehensive tourism plan. The combination of theory and practice will prepare students to analyze tourism markets, assess area, regional and national weakness and strengths as well as the security, infrastructure/logistics, marketing and costs associated tourism. Topics include: importance of tourism to the economy, developing the tourism strategy, ecotourism, research and analysis, positioning and marketing, funding tourism and developing new attractions.
  • MET AD 603: Evaluating and Developing Markets for Cultural Tourism
    Cultural tourism in the 21st century is more than the traditional passive activities of visiting a museum, hearing a concert or strolling down an historic street. It has become an active, dynamic branch of tourism in which half of all tourists have stated that they want some cultural activities during their vacation. In this course we will introduce various themes of cultural tourism including the relationship between the Tourist Industry and the Cultural Heritage Manager, conservation and preservation vs. utilization of a cultural asset, authenticity vs. commoditization, stakeholders and what should be their rights and obligations, tangible and intangible tourist assets, the role of government, private industry and the non-profit sectors in tourism planning and sustainable economic development. We will examine these themes in different areas of cultural tourism including the art industry, historical sites, cultural landmarks, special events and festivals, theme parks and gastronomy.
  • MET AD 610: Enterprise Risk Management
    This overview course examines the management issues involved with assessing the security and risk environments in both the private and public sectors in order to assure continuous system-wide operations. The course studies the elements of risk assessment and operational continuity using the project management framework of planning, organizing, and control. Students are exposed to the role of the firm in crisis response and management as well as the terms, systems, and interactions necessary to assure continuous operations. Topics include: the role and need for comprehensive assurance strategy and planning; the security aspects of the firm; an overview of the system-wide structure?as well as the organizations within that structure?designed to plan for and respond to local or national crisis; the social and emotional impact on the workforce as well as its effect on productivity; and the organizational infrastructure relating to national, regional, and international compliance. 4 cr
  • MET AD 611: The Social and Psychological Elements of Workplace Disruption
    This course focuses on the human-factor aspects of crisis management as they relate to maintaining reasonable business activity while facing continuity disruption, and the important areas of proactive versus reactive leadership during crises. In addition, the course will discuss the leadership qualities that are essential during crisis periods. The course will assist the student in understanding that, at times, the human resource elements of the workforce recovery may be even more complicated than the logistical ones. In fact, the ?best practices? for mitigating the impact of crises/disasters on personnel are often not well understood or sufficiently prioritized. Students will learn to appreciate that the reactions and needs of employees may vary and change over time. 4cr.
  • MET AD 612: COO-Public Emergency Management
    This course examines emergency management from national, state, local, and family perspectives of prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery. The course encompasses knowledge of the specific agencies, organizations, and individual behaviors in emergency management as well as the interlinking partnerships between/among these groups. Areas of discussion include: responsibilities at federal, state, community and individual levels; guidelines and procedures for operations and compliance such as the National response Plan; Incident Command Systems (ICS); exercises; plan development, command, and control; communication; partnership development and maintenance; leadership; and numerous other elements related to effective emergency management. The unique and critical roles of private and public partnerships are reviewed and particular attention is paid to the interplay and interdependency among national, state, community, business (public and private), and the individual. 4cr.