• MET CJ 305: Violence in the Family
    This course will look at American family violence across the life span including child abuse, teen dating violence, wife battering and elder abuse. Physical, emotional and sexual abuse will be examined. We will consider how family violence differs by class and ethnic group and its differential impact on women. Institutional responses to family violence in the legal, medical and social service systems will be included as well as the role played by the women's shelter movement. Ideological supports for family violence in gender expectations, religious teaching and the media will also be studied.
  • MET CJ 344: Drugs and Society
    Introduction to the sociology of a wide range of legal and illicit drugs. Examines social definitions of drugs and conditions of their use. Considers deviant drug use and effects of social control on definitions and use.
  • MET CJ 351: Criminal Law
    Theory and practice of criminal law, including sanctions, individual liability, limitations on state action, criminal and victim rights, evidence, defense, deterrence, mandatory sentencing, decriminalization, intent, entrapment, vagueness, and capital punishment. Case studies of recent court decisions.
  • MET CJ 352: Courts, Society, and Criminal Procedure
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET CJ 351; or consent of instructor.
    Federal, state, and local criminal courts and their relationship to contemporary social and political issues. Historical background of the current criminal court system. Institutional functions of the courts. Role of the courts in reducing crime. Judicial process and criminal procedure, case studies and court decisions.
  • MET CJ 420: Directed Study
    Independent study in criminal justice under faculty guidance. Prior approval by program director required.
  • MET CJ 510: Special Topics in Criminal Justice
    CJ510 is the designation for "Special Topics in Criminal Justice". The subject matter for CJ510 courses changes from semester to semester, and more than one CJ510 can be offered in a given semester. For course descriptions, please contact the Department or the Graduate Student Advisor, Professor Cronin, at

    Summer 1 2015 --Special Topic: Race, Crime, and Justice
    Examining the intersections of race, crime, and justice is crucial for anyone seeking to understand the complexities of criminal justice in American society. The events involving the response to the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO, among other high-profile incidents in recent years, serve as stark examples of the larger historical, social, and political forces that shape the distribution of justice in society and the ongoing debates about fairness in justice administration. Disparities based on race, ethnicity, national origin, and other personal characteristics persist across many domains of the justice system (police courts and corrections) and other institutional responses to crime and delinquency (e.g. neighborhoods, schools). Drawing on rigorous social science from a variety of perspectives, this course examines the role of race in criminal justice policymaking and administration processes. Students analyze race as a determinant for public support for justice policies, police decision-making (around "stop and frisk" and use of force) through prosecution, sentencing, and correctional outcomes. The course provides a forum for open dialogue about the nature and causes of justice in American society as well as avenues for reform.

    Summer 2 2015 -- Special Topic: Special Populations in Corrections
    There are several million prisoners in the United States, and within this population there are many who present significant and complex challenges to correctional administrators -- so called "special populations." Due to correctional agencies playing a primary role in mental health services in America today, the largest and most important group is people possessing various mental illnesses. Other groups include sex offenders, people with chronic health illnesses, and gang members. This course examines the history of managing special populations, with a primary focus on the mentally ill. Through interactive lectures, discussions, facility tours, and presentations from current practitioners, students explore the impact of social trends, philosophy, and resultant laws and policies on the marginalization of some of the most challenging yet vulnerable offenders. Students consider what types of policies and practices might lead to more effectively managing and treating these populations and decreasing the burden on the correctional system and society.
  • MET CJ 511: Rehabilitation and Re-Integration
    Community re-integration following imprisonment has long been recognized as a significant problem. Longer sentences and rapid changes have created new problems for both returning inmates and those who provide services both inside and outside the criminal justice system. This course will examine rehabilitation philosophy in theory and practice. Lectures and seminars will address such issues as: the special problems in providing rehabilitation and education in the correctional system, the effect of inmate subculture on rehabilitation, and balancing demands for custody and rehabilitation.
  • MET CJ 520: Violence and Trauma
    Violence and Trauma examines the psychological impact of crime, terror and disasters on society and the individuals who are members of it. The class is geared toward students in the social sciences including Psychology, Urban Affairs, Criminal Justice, and Sociology. A variety of traumas will be examined (e.g., childhood abuse, domestic violence and crime, war combat, terrorism, and natural disasters). The course examines the social, cultural and political environments in which trauma, trauma research and treatment occur. This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of traumatic stress studies including the nature of trauma, responses to trauma and treatment for disorders of traumatic stress.
  • MET CJ 601: History of Criminal Justice
    Graduate Prerequisites: upper-level or graduate standing.
    This course examines the evolution of the criminal justice system in America, emphasizing the period from the 18th century to contemporary forms of social control. An appreciation of the historical antecedents of crime and justice will deepen students' understanding of the modern-day institutions of law enforcement, courts, and corrections.
  • MET CJ 602: Criminology
    This course explores potential answers to complex and important questions about criminal behavior by drawing on the social science of criminology. Criminology is the interdisciplinary study of the development of law, criminal phenomena and societal responses to crime. The primary emphasis of this course will be discussing and evaluating major explanations or theories of crime. Because criminology is interdisciplinary, we will examine theories that are ground in a range of academic perspectives, including sociological, biological, political, psychological and economic explanations for crime. Course lectures and discussions focus on the historical development of the theories, their major assumptions and propositions, their relevance for public policy and practice. As we progress through each explanation for crime, we critically evaluate the validity of different explanations for crime as well as criminal justice policies and practices that they support.
  • MET CJ 610: Cybercrime
    This course is designed to help students understand and apply the nature of computer crime in the criminal justice field. Several theories (both micro-level and macro-level) will be presented and will be analyzed in depth and applied to computer crime cases both past and present. Students will see how major theories have been re-developed to be applied to computer crime, and by using these theories, students will both develop and explore different strategies for future law enforcement. Students will be presented with common types of fraudulent schemes, as well as several laws that have been enacted and developed specifically for computer crime. In addition, causes, victimization, legal issues, control strategies, and societal costs regarding the "computer-crime" problem will be explored and evaluated.
  • MET CJ 625: Victimology
    The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the discipline of victimology, an emerging area of specialization in the field of criminology. Emphasis will focus on crime victims and their plight, the relationships between crime victims and other social groups and institutions, such as the media, business, politicians, special interest groups, and social movements. The issues of Justice and Redress from the perspective of the victim as well as general society will be stressed. An overview of victim prevention programs and victim assistance programs will be presented. Topics such as the Restorative Justice Model, Victim Repayment, and Victim/Offender Mediation will be included in the course content. While the course follows an interdisciplinary approach and is designed for general interest and appeal, it has particular relevance for students drawn from disciplinary interests in the fields of criminal justice, psychology, sociology, education, health care administration, and political science.
  • MET CJ 631: Youth Crime Problems
    Throughout this course, students will analyze the policy issues concerning juvenile justice and youth crime. Emphasis will be put on the scope and nature of youth crime and the young offender, as well as juvenile justice procedures, programs and institutional roles. Over the semester, students will also be asked to consider delinquency prevention programs, violent offenders, dispositional alternatives, and crimes against youth.
  • MET CJ 632: White-Collar Crime
    The purpose of this course is to examine the nature and extent of corporate and white-collar crime, including detection, deterrence, and criminal liability sanctions, as well as, the social and legal changes related to corporate illegality. Students will use case materials which address securities fraud, money "laundering", professional deviance, and political corruption, in addition to other topics. Students will also analyze policy responses including RICO and other laws, regulations and court processing.
  • MET CJ 650: Terrorism
    This course will include a general introduction to the overt as well as underlying ideology, history, reasons and causes of terrorism. Both domestic and international terrorism will be discussed. Domestic hate groups will also receive particular attention. The roles of politics and the media will be discussed. Students will be exposed to the philosophies of terrorists and terrorism. Counter terrorism will also be discussed at length. Students are expected to participate actively in the course. There will be written assignments, a midterm, a class presentation, and a final paper.
  • MET CJ 656: Forensic Criminal Investigation
    Forensic Criminal Investigation is an examination of the strategies, techniques, and procedures implicated in the process of conducting forensic criminal investigations, i.e. cases that will seek adjudication in the criminal court. Students will examine cold cases, concluded successful investigations, ongoing investigations as well as the perspective and worldview of the perpetrators and victims of violent crimes in an effort to deconstruct and disassemble crimes, crime scenes and the criminal mind.
  • MET CJ 660: Gender and Justice
    This course examines the role of gender in both criminal behavior and the societal response to crime. Gender affects criminal behavior, structures our responses to crime, and presents unique challenges for the criminal justice system. While the course examines the role of gender in these ways for both men and women, the course focuses on the limitations of research, policy and practice that has focused traditionally on male offenders. The course also examines the role of gender in criminal justice organizations and processes.
  • MET CJ 701: Crime and Punishment
    Graduate Prerequisites: upper-level or graduate standing.
    Police officers, corrections officers, probation and parole officers, youth service officers, federal law enforcement agents, and court professionals are all called upon on a daily basis to make critical decisions that significantly affect the lives of those entrusted to them. Students in this course will consider applications of ethical actions as they pertain to issues of social justice. Toward that end, we will forge a strong notion of our definition of just what constitutes social justice.
  • MET CJ 702: Analytical Methods
    This course introduces students to the use of quantitative data in analyzing the criminal justice system. It serves as an introduction to the statistical methods used in applied social science research and furthers students' understanding of the role statistical analysis plays in planning and policy development.
  • MET CJ 703: Research Methods
    This course introduces students to the practice, theory, and philosophy of social science research, with a special focus on criminal justice. It not only broadens students' knowledge of the ethical issues associated with research, but also introduces them to a variety of research techniques such as surveys, field research, and experimental designs. Research Methods will lay the foundation for students to become informed "consumers" of research, as well as "producers" of it.