Courses

  • MET AT 762: Mathematical Finance for Actuarial Science
    Graduate Prerequisites: MET MA225 Multivariate Calculus, MET MA581/CAS MA581 Probability, andMET AT 721 Mathematics of Compound Interest
    This course covers the analysis of derivative products and their use in insurance and risk management strategies. It covers selected aspects of rational valuation of derivative products like put-call parity, binomial option, and Black Scholes option pricing model. 4cr.
  • MET AT 782: Pension Mathematics and Mortality Tables
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: (MET MA581 or CAS MA581) and MET AT721
    This course covers pension actuarial funding methods and the use of life contingencies. Included are analyses of the funding methods allowable under ERISA, their computation, and uses. We will also review the use of mortality tables, and discuss the various actuarial functions that are used in pension actuarial calculations. Finally, the course will review implications for pension funding under the IRS Code.
  • MET AT 981: Internship in Actuarial Science I
    The course is offered to students who seek practical applications of actuarial principles in insurance companies, financial institutions, pension consulting firms, and other related fields.
  • MET AT 982: Internship in Actuarial Science II
    Graduate Prerequisites: MET AT722 and AT731 and cumulative GPA of 3.3 or higher and consent of instructor
    The course is offered to students who seek practical applications of actuarial principles in insurance companies, financial institutions, pension consulting firms, and other related fields. The course requires students to participate in an internship program within the industry. Students need to submit monthly progress reports and a final semester report to the Chairman, Department of Actuarial Science at Boston University.
  • MET AT 990: Seminar in Actuarial Science
    Seminars are offered for special topics related to actuarial science, life insurance, casualty insurance, insurance medicine, mortality and mobility, health outcomes, economics, policy, pension, social insurance, mathematical finance, statistics, and other related fields. Variable cr.
  • MET AT 991: Directed Studies I
    The course is offered to students who plan to engage in special research topics under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Application is made through the Department of Actuarial Science.
  • MET AT 992: Directed Studies II
    The course is offered to students who plan to engage in special research topics under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Application is made through the Department of Actuarial Science.
  • MET BI 105: Introductory Biology for Health Sciences (N)
    Principles of biology: emphasis on cellular structure, heredity, development, and organic evolution. Intended for nonmajors as well as for those concentrating in the health and paramedical sciences. Laboratory course. Three hours lecture, two hours lab.
  • MET BI 106: Human Anatomy (N)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET BI 105.
    Gross structure of the human body: skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Laboratory course. Three hours lecture, two hours lab.
  • MET BI 107: Biology I: Evolution, Ecology, and Behavior
    Assumes year of high school biology and chemistry. For premedical students and students who plan to concentrate in the natural sciences. Required of biology concentrators. It is recommended that MET CH 101 and CH 102 be taken prior to or concurrently with this sequence. Each course has three hours lecture and three hours lab.
  • MET BI 108: Biology II: Cells, Genetics, Development, and Physiology
    Assumes year of high school biology and chemistry. For premedical students and students who plan to concentrate in the natural sciences. Required of biology concentrators. It is recommended that MET CH 101 and CH 102 be taken prior to or concurrently with this sequence. Each course has three hours lecture and three hours lab. Course examines cells, genetics, development, physiology, and neurobiology.
  • MET BI 203: Cell Biology (CM)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET BI 108 and MET CH 102.
    Principles of cellular organization and function: biological molecules, enzymes, bioenergetics, membranes, motility, regulatory mechanisms. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion.
  • MET BI 206: Genetics (CM)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET BI 108; or equivalent.
    MET CH 203 recommended. Principles of heredity as derived from genetic, biochemical, and cytological evidence in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion.
  • MET BI 211: Human Physiology (N)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET BI 105; or equivalent.
    Designed for non-biology majors. Introduction to physiology. Principles of physiology with special reference to humans. Laboratory course. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.
  • MET BI 303: Ecology (EBE)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET BI 107.
    Basic principles of ecology, population dynamics and behavior, interrelationships of plants and animals and their physical and chemical environment. Structure and function of ecosystems and community dynamics. Laboratory course. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.
  • MET BI 315: Systems Physiology (PER/NEURO)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET BI 108 and MET BI 203.
    An introduction to the basic physiological principles applied across all levels of organization (cell, tissue, organ system) and intended to prepare the student for more advanced courses in physiology. Topics include homeostasis, neural, muscle, cardiopulmonary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive physiology. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.
  • MET BI 407: Animal Behavior (EBE)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: MET BI 107; or equivalent.
    Ethological approach to animal behavior, including humans; physiological, ontogenetic, and phylogenetic causes and adaptive significance of behavior within an evolutionary framework. Laboratory course. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.
  • MET BI 426: Neurobiology of Consciousness
    Your brain is a bizarre device, set in place through natural selection of your ancestors and your own experience. One thing that clearly separates your brain from the brain of any other non-human animal is the propensity of your brain for imagination and creativity. In this class we will dive into the neuroscience of imagination: from neurons to memory to neurological control of novel conscious experiences. We will study what makes your brain unique and the selectional forces that shaped the brains of our ancestors. We will discuss what makes human language special and how it evolved. This interdisciplinary class is intended for paleoanthropologists who want to learn neuroscience, psychologists who are interested in the question of the origin of language, biologists who are interested in the uniqueness of the human mind, neuroscientists who want an exposure to paleoanthropology and linguistics, philosophers fascinated by neurological basis of behavior and other students interested in an understanding of the mind of a man and the evolution of the brain.
  • MET BI 491: Research in Biology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: senior standing, minimum GPA of 3.0 (B) in biology, consent of instructor, and approval of research outline by Department of Biology.
    Laboratory or field research projects in biology may be chosen under supervision of Department of Biology. Minimum 12 hours per week in laboratory or fieldwork, not including preparation or evaluation time. Both semesters of research may count toward concentration credit in biology if two semesters of work are completed.
  • MET BI 492: Research in Biology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: senior standing, minimum GPA of 3.0 (B) in biology, consent of instructor, and approval of research outline by Department of Biology.
    Laboratory or field research projects in biology may be chosen under supervision of Department of Biology. Minimum 12 hours per week in laboratory or fieldwork, not including preparation or evaluation time. Both semesters of research may count toward concentration credit in biology if two semesters of work are completed.