Juris Doctor

  • LAW JD 602: Lawyering Skills 1
    Provides training in legal research, legal writing, oral advocacy, client interviewing, and client counseling through simulations of real-world legal disputes.
  • LAW JD 603: Lawyering Skills 2
    Provides training in legal research, legal writing, oral advocacy, client interviewing, and client counseling through simulations of real-world legal disputes.
  • LAW JD 605: Business Fundamentals
    Introduction to Business Fundamentals is an online, self-paced, asynchronous program forming a required part of the JD curriculum. The curriculum consists of modules covering business basics, corporate finance and financial accounting, including the following subjects: capital markets; the basics of financial reporting; balance sheets; income statements and cash flow; business forms and organizations; financing organizations; discounting; and calculating risk, return and valuation. Assessment is based on multiple choice exams. Students may opt-out of the course if they score an 84% or better on the pre-course exam. A score of 70% or better on the post-course exam, following successful completion of the course, is necessary to meet the requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course awards no credits and is graded P/F. It is a graduation requirement for JD students who will be graduating with the Class of 2017 or later. Students may enroll in the program for the fall, spring or summer semesters, but should complete the course by the conclusion of the fall semester of the 3L year.
  • LAW JD 607: Lawyering Lab
    The one-week intensive Lawyering Lab guides students to bring to bear legal concepts, core practice competencies and practical judgment to address simulated client problems and achieve a client's objectives within the bounds of the law --the essence of what clients hire attorneys to do. This is done through lectures to provide necessary background, but more importantly through interactive discussion and "hands-on" exercises--both in and outside of class- -that require students to actually do what lawyers do in solving client problems and achieving their objectives. This includes (1) determining the client's goals; (2) determining the legal constraints and opportunities that affect the client's ability to get what it wants; (3) determining the relevant facts; (4) identifying multiple options for action; (5) assessing the various options to generate possible recommendations, (6) counseling the client; and (7) negotiating and drafting agreements. Students work collaboratively to produce the kind of memos, analyses, and advice written by practicing lawyers. The deadlines for class assignments are tight, as they usually are for lawyers seeking to respond with immediacy to particular client problems. Through the expertise and guidance of the instructors, collaborative exercises with peers, and exposure to some of the day-to-day elements of lawyering, students in the Lawyering Lab learn about law and legal practice in a way that is exciting, innovative, and participant-centered. 1 credit, P/F.
  • LAW JD 700: Introduction to American Law
    The class covers the basic structure and function of US legal institutions: the congress, the president, and regulatory agencies, and, especially, the federal courts. It examines the role of state law and state courts in the American system of federalism. The course also studies the American judicial processes of constitutional analyses, interpretation of statues, and development of common law. Some attention is paid to court procedures, including trial by jury. Finally, students study a few topics that are illustrative of the treatment of individual rights in American law, such as freedom of speech, anti-discrimination law, and protection of private property. The class grants two credits towards the American Law degree.
  • LAW JD 701: Professional Responsibility for Int'l LLMs
    This course offers an approach to the lawyer's responsibilities to clients, the profession, and the public. Topics addressed will be problems of disclosure, conflict of interest, advertising, adversary tactics, competence, attorney fees, and fiduciary duties. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.
  • LAW JD 702: Property for LL.M. Students
    This course exposes LL.M. students to the basic principles of real property law, including possession, ownership, rights in land, conveyances, estates, future interests, real estate contracts, easements, land use disputes, landlord-tenant issues, and land use controls, among others. The course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of the essential doctrines of real property law for LL.M. students interested in taking a U.S. bar exam. Meeting dates - 1/17/2018-2/26/2018.
  • LAW JD 703: Evidence for LLMs
    This course provides LL.M. students with an overview of the substantive rules governing the admissibility or exclusion of evidence at trial. Subjects include competency of witnesses, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, the rule against hearsay and its exceptions, expert and lay opinion testimony, privileged communications, relevancy, procedural considerations, judicial notice, burden of proof, presumptions, form and type of objections, authentication, the best evidence rule and the use of demonstrative and scientific evidence. The course is designed to give students a fundamental understanding of evidentiary rules in anticipation of taking a US bar exam. Meeting dates - 3/12/2018-4/23/2018.
  • LAW JD 704: Tutorial: Empirical Research on Competition
    In this tutorial we study empirical research techniques and participate in ongoing research on measures of industry competition and concentration and factors affecting those measures, including the role of information technology, regulation, and political activity. Familiarity with statistics or econometrics is recommended.
  • LAW JD 706: Writing Supplements
    Students enrolled in the spring section of Trusts & Estates have the option of enrolling in this one-credit Writing Supplement. Designed for students who are interested in practicing in the areas covered by the course, these one-credit supplements are taught by experienced attorneys who practice in these areas. In collaboration with the professor teaching the substantive course, the practitioner instructs students in drafting documents related to the substantive coursework. Writing sections consist of one introductory meeting and a number of follow up meetings (specific dates TBD) to discuss drafts in progress. Because enrollment is limited, you will receive substantial feedback and individualized instruction. Students enrolled in the spring section of Trusts & Estates have the option of enrolling in this one-credit Writing Supplement. Designed for students who are interested in practicing in the areas covered by the course, these one-credit supplements are taught by experienced attorneys who practice in these areas. In collaboration with the professor teaching the substantive course, the practitioner instructs students in drafting documents related to the substantive coursework. Writing sections consist of one introductory meeting and a number of follow up meetings (specific dates TBD) to discuss drafts in progress. Because enrollment is limited, you will receive substantial feedback and individualized instruction. NOTE: This course satisfies the upper-class Professional Skills requirement and counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement.
  • LAW JD 709: Independent Proposal Externship: Fieldwork (C)
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. Students receive credit for an externship done in conjunction with an independent study project. Qualifying placements include the legal departments of non-profits, government agencies, private companies, or law firms (working on pro bono projects only). Placements may be paid or unpaid. Students may find their own placements that must be approved by the Office of Experiential Education, or the Office has resources to help students identify and apply to suitable field placements based on their interests and career goals. Students receive 3-9 variable P/F credits for their fieldwork, as determined in consultation with their placement supervisors. Each credit requires 50 hours of work over the course of the 13-week semester (averaging 4 hours per week). NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: INDEPENDENT PROPOSAL EXTERNSHIP: PAPER (LAW JD 710).
  • LAW JD 710: Independent Proposal Externship: Paper
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students enrolled in the Independent Proposal Externship: Fieldwork course. Students work with a faculty supervisor in writing a 15-20 page research paper related to the subject area of the placement, and submitting seven 4-6 page reflective journals. NOTE: Students who enroll in this component of the externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement or the Upper-class writing requirement. It may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. COREQUISITE: INDEPENDENT PROPOSAL EXTERNSHIP: FIELDWORK (LAW JD 709).
  • LAW JD 711: Judicial Writing (S)
    This course will focus on writing styles and formats unique to the judicial process, such as the bench memo and appellate majority and dissenting opinion. Classes will provide a general overview of the opinion writing function with emphasis on topics such as opinion structure, judicial writing style, the relationship between style and substance, the use of narrative and rhetorical techniques, and ethical considerations in opinion writing. Through a series of writing assignments and in-class exercises, students will learn to how to diagnose and revise difficult and unclear writing, acquire techniques for writing more economically, precisely and unambiguously, and hone their skills in structuring and organizing, analyzing, and writing persuasively. In analyzing judicial opinions and writing from the perspective of a judge rather than an advocate, students will gain a deeper understanding of the judicial process and will become better critical readers and users of judicial opinions. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 14 students. NOTES: This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 712: Legal Writing for Civil Litigation (S)
    This class is designed to give students a variety of legal writing experiences, all related to civil litigation. Students will draft a variety of documents, including discovery-related documents, pleadings, and motions. Students will complete multiple drafts of these documents, meet individually with the instructor to discuss the drafts, and engage in peer editing of their classmates' papers. Students will work with a single fact pattern throughout the semester, and will conduct extensive research as part of the course. In class, students will discuss litigation strategy, research skills and ethical and professional concerns. In addition, the class will also include in-class writing exercises designed to improve the students' writing skills. NOTES: This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This seminar does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 713: Persuasive Writing (S)
    This seminar will focus on improving students' persuasive writing skills through a series of assignments and in-class exercises. Students will draft a variety of documents designed to persuade, including a statement of the facts and memos in support of motions. Some legal research will be necessary for these assignments, but the emphasis will be on writing, not on research. Students will complete multiple drafts of these documents, meet individually with the instructor to discuss the drafts, and engage in peer editing of their classmates' papers to improve their own writing skills. The class will also include discussions of persuasive writing strategies, comparisons of examples of good and bad persuasive writing, and in-class writing exercises. Students will be graded on the basis of their written work, their peer editing work, and on their classroom participation. There will be no final exam. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 14 students. NOTES: This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 717: Health Law Research
    Health law encompasses the engagement of the legal system with a large and dynamic segment of the U.S. economy. In this class, students will gain a familiarity with how to navigate the statutory and regulatory framework of health law, how to evaluate resources, and how complex and multi-part search strategies may be applied to research problems. Students will also gain a deeper understanding of databases beyond Lexis, Westlaw and Bloomberg, and of current awareness sources. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using print, electronic, and web-based resources. Students will be evaluated on several grounds, including class participation, regular assignments, and a short paper and presentation. NOTE: This class satisfies the upper-class Professional Skills requirement and counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. Meeting Dates: January 25 to March 22.
  • LAW JD 719: Transactional Contracts: Drafting and Analyzing Transactional Agreements under U.S. Law (for foreign-trained LL.M. students)
    This course is for foreign-trained LL.M. students. It teaches students basic principles and skills of drafting and analyzing transaction and other business agreements under U.S. law, with a focus on recognizing, and addressing through contractual provisions, key business issues in various transactional contexts, including asset purchases and sales, intellectual property licensing and employment agreements. While the course utilizes lectures to introduce various contract concepts and techniques essential for drafting and analyzing transaction and other commercial agreements, it requires that students complete in-class exercises and homework assignments as a means of building basic drafting skills and a solid understanding of the structure and operation of contractual provisions in a business transaction under U.S. law. Grades will be based on the graded assignments, good faith completion of ungraded assignments, and class participation. CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option.
  • LAW JD 724: Entrepreneurship & IP Clinic (C)
    THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Entrepreneurship & IP Clinic. The Entrepreneurship & IP Clinic if a full-year clinic that provides students the opportunity to perform work for real clients on a variety of matters typically encountered by entrepreneurs in launching new business ventures, such as choice of entity, capital structure, equity allocation and compensation, intellectual property ownership and licensing, financing and employment arrangements. Students will also learn, through their first-hand client work, the ethical rules of professional responsibility regarding entity representation, including identification of the client, identifying potential conflicts of interest, and advising clients and associated persons as to the nature and implications of the attorney-client relationship. In addition to their fieldwork, students attend a weekly seminar that develops concepts and skills to support their fieldwork. The seminar features substantive lectures, student-led discussions and guest speakers, and students present and discuss their ongoing client matters. The clinic meets for two semesters, with more advanced seminar topics and increased responsibility for cases occurring in the spring semester. PRE/CO-REQUISITE: Corporations. Students are also strongly encouraged to take Contract Drafting and some intellectual property coursework (the IP survey course and/or other subject-matter-specific courses). NOTE: This clinic satisfies the upper-class professional skills requirement and counts towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.
  • LAW JD 725: Technology & Cyberlaw Clinic: Fieldwork (C)
    THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Technology and Cyberlaw Clinic. The Clinic provides counseling and guidance to assist MIT and BU students with laws and regulations that relate to their innovation-related academic and extracurricular activities. The clinic provides counseling in areas of technology law including data privacy and security, intellectual property, computer crimes, regulatory compliance, and public records laws. Representation of clients can include client counseling, negotiation with third parties, and, if capacity allows, litigation and other dispute resolution. The fieldwork may also include presentations to MIT and BU students and faculty about areas of law that are implicated in independent research and innovation. PRE/CO-REQUISITE: a course in one of the following three areas: (1) intellectual property (either an IP survey course or other core IP course such as patent, copyright, or trademark); (2) privacy (including information privacy seminar); or (3) cybersecurity. NOTE: The Technology & Cyberlaw Clinic satisfies the upper-class professional skills requirement and counts towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.
  • LAW JD 726: Health Care Fraud and Abuse (S)
    This seminar will use a practical, case-study approach to some of the issues arising in the complex world of health care enforcement and compliance. With emphasis on the procedural mechanisms of the False Claims Act and the substantive law of the Anti-Kickback Act, the Stark I and II laws, the Food Drug and Cosmetic Act, and the government's remedial authorities, the seminar will explore how prosecutors, defense attorneys, whistleblowers, and compliance officials inside health care companies approach their work and advise their clients. The seminar will explore the relationships between regulated industries (e.g., pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, doctors, medical device companies) and government insurance programs (e.g., Medicaid and Medicare), why these relationships generate billions of dollars every year in fraud, and how the interested constituencies are approaching these issues. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION: A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement with the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 students. OFFERING PATTERN: This class is not offered every year. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.