Juris Doctor

  • LAW JD 718: Banking and Financial Law Research
    Banking law has been at the epicenter of recent economic events and major reforms have been passed by Congress and now need to be implemented. Learn how to find laws and regulations, use specialized practice materials and search for agency issuances, among other research tasks. Lawyers practicing banking law often use licensed products other than LexisNexis, Westlaw and Bloomberg in their offices. Students will become familiar with these products in this class. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using major print, electronic, and web based resources for banking law research. Students will be required to complete an assignment for every class using electronic and print resources. NOTE: This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. This course meets from 1/20/2016 to 2/24/2016.
  • LAW JD 719: Transactional Contracts: Drafting and Analyzing Transactional Agreements under U.S. Law (for foreign-trained LL.M. students)
    This course is for foreign-trained LL.M. students. It teaches students basic principles and skills of drafting and analyzing transaction and other business agreements under U.S. law, with a focus on recognizing, and addressing through contractual provisions, key business issues in various transactional contexts, including asset purchases and sales, intellectual property licensing and employment agreements. While the course utilizes lectures to introduce various contract concepts and techniques essential for drafting and analyzing transaction and other commercial agreements, it requires that students complete in-class exercises and homework assignments as a means of building basic drafting skills and a solid understanding of the structure and operation of contractual provisions in a business transaction under U.S. law. Grades will be based on the graded assignments, good faith completion of ungraded assignments, and class participation.
  • LAW JD 720: Remedies
    The course explores the principal remedies available through civil litigation, including compensatory damages, injunctions, declaratory judgments, restitution, and punitive damages, along with remedial defenses. It covers both private-law and public-law remedies. The course examines general principles about the law of remedies that cut across substantive fields and that will be useful to a student or lawyer encountering a remedies problem in any context. It also takes up debates concerning whether law and economics or corrective justice provides a better account of the aims and underlying principles of the law of remedies. The course will be of considerable practical value to anyone interested in civil litigation.
  • LAW JD 722: Environmental Justice Law
    Environmental Justice can be defined as the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people, regardless of race, color, national origin, or income with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws and policies. Over the last two decades efforts to secure environmental justice have become important features of environmental policy and activism. This course will explore why environmental justice concerns have arisen, and what legal mechanisms may be used to address them. We will identify current situations where claims of environmental injustice might be made, and examine how existing legal tools, including the 1964 Civil Rights Act and federal environmental statutes, might be applied to deal with them. The final grade will be determined on the basis of two short papers, a final exam, and class participation. There is no prerequisite for this course. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. OFFERING PATTERN: This class is not offered every year. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule.
  • LAW JD 724: Entrepreneurship & IP Clinic (C)
    The Entrepreneurship & IP Clinic is a full-year program where students earn 6 credits per semester. It will provide the opportunity for students to enhance their knowledge and understanding of these areas and build important practice skills through the representation of clients. In addition to your clinic work, you will participate in a classroom component which is integrated with the case work and examines lawyering skills related to transactional and IP practice, including interviewing, strategic planning, counseling, negotiation and drafting; discusses professional roles and ethical issues; and explores substantive law topics including for-profit business entities, and intellectual property. NOTE: This clinic satisfies the upper-class professional skills requirement.
  • LAW JD 726: Health Care Fraud and Abuse (S)
    This seminar will use a practical, case-study approach to some of the issues arising in the complex world of health care enforcement and compliance. With emphasis on the procedural mechanisms of the False Claims Act and the substantive law of the Anti-Kickback Act, the Stark I and II laws, the Food Drug and Cosmetic Act, and the government's remedial authorities, the seminar will explore how prosecutors, defense attorneys, whistleblowers, and compliance officials inside health care companies approach their work and advise their clients. The seminar will explore the relationships between regulated industries (e.g., pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, doctors, medical device companies) and government insurance programs (e.g., Medicaid and Medicare), why these relationships generate billions of dollars every year in fraud, and how the interested constituencies are approaching these issues. NOTE: This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 students. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option. OFFERING PATTERN: This class is not offered every year. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 728: Government Lawyering Externship/Fieldwork (C)
    The Government Lawyering Externship is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. Accepted students must register for the ungraded fieldwork component and the graded seminar. Through the Government Lawyering Externship Program (GLEP), students work at a state or federal agency. Upon acceptance to the Government Lawyering Externship Program program, the Office of Clinical Programs works with students to identify suitable field placements depending on each student's individual interests and career goals. The range of opportunities in the government is extensive and there are great options out there for every student. COREQUISITE: Government Lawyering Seminar (JD 729)
  • LAW JD 729: Government Lawyering Externship/Seminar
    The Government Lawyering Externship is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. Accepted students register for the ungraded fieldwork component and this graded seminar. The two hour weekly seminar will explore topics including determining who the "client" is for purposes of the attorney-client relationship, the interaction with other government agencies, ethical and moral considerations unique to government attorneys, and the impact of politics on the work of a government lawyer. Students will write weekly journals about their externship experience and will also write a final research paper. COREQUISITE: Government Lawyering Externship: Fieldwork (JD 728)
  • LAW JD 731: Critical Race Theory (S)
    This seminar explores the utility of Critical Race Theory to the study of law. Specifically, this seminar analyzes the centrality of the law in constructing and maintaining -- as well as dismantling -- racism, racial inequalities, and race itself. The latter part of the seminar will consist of a sustained analysis of Critical Race Theory as it speaks to issues of gender and reproduction. Students will write a research paper; with the permission of the instructor, this paper may satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 734: Securities Law Research
    Securities law is a complex and dynamic area of law with unique legal research challenges. Students will learn to navigate the statutory and regulatory framework of securities law, use specialized practice materials and search for securities filings and company information, among other research tasks. Students will become familiar with databases licensed by many firms practicing securities law. Legal information and technologies in this area are constantly changing and new lawyers should be familiar with the most recent research techniques. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using major print, electronic, and web based resources for securities law research. Students will be required to complete several assignments using electronic and print resources. NOTE: This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. This course meets from 10/20/2015 to 11/24/2015.
  • LAW JD 735: Judicial Externship: Fieldwork (C)
    The Judicial Externship is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. Through the Judicial Externship Program, you may work part-time for credit for a judge in the state or federal court system. As a judicial intern, you will work on assignments typically handled during a post-graduate clerkship. You will spend 16-20 hrs./wk. at your field placement, earning 4-5 ungraded credits. COREQUISITE: Judicial Externship: Judicial Process Seminar (JD 736).
  • LAW JD 736: Judicial Externship: Judicial Process Seminar
    The Judicial Externship is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. In this seminar, which is the class component for the Judicial Externship Program, we will discuss several issues related to the roles of the judge and judicial intern. We will discuss issues of confidentiality and ethical considerations applicable to judges and to interns and law clerks. We also will explore the differences between trial and appellate courts, which set the parameters within which judges make decisions. Students will receive advanced instruction in legal research and writing applicable to their placements. We will discuss examples of effective and ineffective lawyering that interns observe in their placements. We also will focus on the legal and philosophical foundations of judicial decision-making, and how those influence decisions. Finally, we will discuss specialty courts, and processes that judges use to help parties resolve disputes, such as mediation and settlement. Students will be required to write regular journals and a 15 page final paper. Students may be required to do a class presentation. There will be no final exam but students will be evaluated on their final paper, journals, class participation, and class presentation. COREQUISITE: Judicial Externship/Fieldwork (JD 735). NOTE: This seminar does NOT satisfy the professional responsibility requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option.
  • LAW JD 739: Semester-in-Practice: Independent Proposal (C)
    The Semester in Practice is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. Through the Semester-in-Practice Program, a limited number of students may spend a semester working full-time for credit (10 ungraded credits) at an externship placement outside of Boston. The Program is designed for students who want an intensive hands-on experience - at an opportunity not otherwise available in Boston - furthering specific career and academic goals. Acceptance to the Program is competitive. In addition to securing an externship at a placement organization, students must complete a separate BU Law application available through the Clinical Programs Office. Under this option, students may develop their own proposal for a full-time externship outside of Boston. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Independent Paper (JD 740).
  • LAW JD 740: Semester-in-Practice: Independent Paper
    The Semester in Practice is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. Accepted students will register for 2 graded credits for completing readings, writing a research paper, and for submitting weekly journals. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Independent Proposal (JD 739).
  • LAW JD 741: Semester-in-Practice: Human Rights - Geneva (C)
    The Semester in Practice is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. Through the Semester-in-Practice Program, a limited number of students may spend a semester working full-time for credit (10 ungraded credits) at an externship placement outside of Boston. The Program is designed for students who want an intensive hands-on experience - at an opportunity not otherwise available in Boston - furthering specific career and academic goals. Acceptance to the Program is competitive. In addition to securing an externship at a placement organization, students must complete a separate BU Law application available through the Clinical Programs Office. Through the Human Rights option, students may spend a semester working in Geneva for a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) committed to the protection of human rights. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Human Rights Paper (JD 742).
  • LAW JD 742: Semester-in-Practice: Human Rights Paper
    The Semester in Practice is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. Accepted students will register for 2 graded credits for completing readings, writing a research paper, and for submitting weekly journals. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Human Rights Externship - Geneva (JD 741).
  • LAW JD 743: Semester-in-Practice: Death Penalty Externship (C)
    The Semester in Practice is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. Through the Semester-in-Practice Program, a limited number of students may spend a semester working full-time for credit (10 ungraded credits) at an externship placement outside of Boston. The Program is designed for students who want an intensive hands-on experience - at an opportunity not otherwise available in Boston - furthering specific career and academic goals. Acceptance to the Program is competitive. In addition to securing an externship at a placement organization, students must complete a separate BU Law application available through the Clinical Programs Office. Students participating in the Death Penalty Externship may work at the Southern Center for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Death Penalty Paper (JD 744).
  • LAW JD 744: Semester-in-Practice: Death Penalty Paper
    The Semester in Practice is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. Accepted students will register for 2 graded credits for completing readings, writing a research paper, and for submitting weekly journals. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Death Penalty Externship (JD 743).
  • LAW JD 745: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering - Washington, D.C. (C)
    The Semester in Practice is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. Through the Semester-in-Practice Program, a limited number of students may spend a semester working full-time for credit (10 ungraded credits) at an externship placement outside of Boston. The Program is designed for students who want an intensive hands-on experience - at an opportunity not otherwise available in Boston - furthering specific career and academic goals. Acceptance to the Program is competitive. In addition to securing an externship at a placement organization, students must complete a separate BU Law application available through the Clinical Programs Office. Through the Government Lawyering option, students may spend a semester working at a government office in Washington. Examples include opportunities with the staff of a Congressional committee or subcommittee, in the legal office of an administrative agency, or with a federal board/commission. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering Paper (JD 746).
  • LAW JD 746: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering Paper
    The Semester in Practice is a one-semester clinical program. Students are required to apply and be accepted to the program before they may register. Accepted students will register for 2 graded credits for completing readings, writing a research paper, and for submitting weekly journals. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering - Washington, D.C. (JD 745).