Juris Doctor

  • LAW JD 985: Corporate Finance
    Graduate Prerequisites: CORPORATIONS
    This course covers the foundations of corporate finance. It starts with the concepts of time value of money, discounting, and present value. With that background it then considers the major financial decisions made by corporate managers. Topics include the valuation of financial assets and liabilities, criteria for making investment decisions, business valuation, relationships between risk and return, portfolio theory, market efficiency, capital structure choice, and cost of capital. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option.
  • LAW JD 986: Legal Writing Fellows
    This class is restricted to students who have applied and been accepted as Writing Fellows for the First Year Writing Program. Accepted students must register for both the fall and spring sections of the class.
  • LAW JD 988: Mergers and Acquisitions
    This course will cover the principal legal, tax and business issues of mergers and acquisitions. PREREQUISITE: Corporations or permission of instructor.
  • LAW JD 989: Jessup Moot Court: Problem Solving in International Law
    This course is restricted to students who applied and were accepted as participants for the Jessup Moot Court competition.
  • LAW JD 990: Feminist Jurisprudence (S)
    This seminar examines the evolution of feminist legal theory and its critique of the U.S. legal system and its norms. It takes up various debates within feminist jurisprudence and examines its application to many contemporary issues of law and public policy. The seminar provides an introduction to feminist jurisprudence and the various "generations" of such scholarship, as well as its relationship to other forms of legal theory. Students will learn about several prominent strands of feminist legal theory, including liberal (or sameness), relational (or difference), radical (or dominance), Critical Race and anti-essentialist, postmodern, and "Third Wave." We will consider the relationship between feminist jurisprudence and other forms of critical theory, such as Critical Race Theory, Queer Theory, and masculinities theory. The seminar will assess debates within feminist jurisprudence concerning how best to understand gender, the ideals of sex equality and equal citizenship, questions of sameness and difference between women and men, and over whether, in view of differences among women based on class, ethnicity, race, sexual orientation and the like, it is desirable or possible to speak about "women" - or "men" - as a meaningful category. Topics covered vary, but will likely include some of the following: legal regulation of sexuality, marriage, reproduction, and family; work/life conflict; employment discrimination (including sexual harassment); political leadership and representation; pornography; poverty and social welfare policy; violence against women; war and military service; international human rights; and the debate over multiculturalism and its impact on sex equality. The format of the seminar is primarily discussion, with some lecturing. The written requirement may be satisfied either by a research paper (which may be used to satisfy the certification requirement) or three shorter papers on assigned questions (which may also be used to satisfy the certification requirement) or a take-home exam. Students will also write several short reaction papers about the readings. OFFERING PATTERN: This class not offered every year. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 991: International Human Rights (S)
    This is an introductory course to international human rights. The course will introduce students to the concepts of human rights, and the instruments that have codified and provided content to those concepts in the last sixty years. We will examine such questions as: Is there such a thing as human rights law? What standards, mechanisms, monitoring or enforcement machinery exists to make human rights concepts "legal"? Is there such a thing as universal consensus on human rights, or are the concepts relative from one region to the next? What, if any, constraints does human rights law place on the actions of sovereign states? How does the UN machinery operate in human rights law-making, monitoring and enforcement? What is the role of regional organizations, domestic courts and international entities in developing, promoting and implementing human rights norms? The course will take a contextualized approach using cases and current situations to address these questions primarily from a human rights perspective. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION: A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar, or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 994: American Indian Law
    This is a survey course of the laws and policies influencing American Indians in the United States today. We will review the tortured history of the relationship between American Indians and the United States government and discuss the complex legal and policy issues surrounding civil and criminal jurisdiction and environmental, land use and economic development issues on and off the Reservation. We will focus on the powers of the respective players in each of these fields, including local and state government, the federal government and tribal governments. OFFERING PATTERN: This class is not offered every year. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule.
  • LAW JD 998: Health Care Transactions (S)
    This course is centered in the health care sector. Partners, associates and general counsel from leading firms will discuss the deals they were personally involved in. After an introduction to joint venture theory and the regulatory context of health care, everyone in the class examines 2 transactions: a physician recruiting agreement and an ambulatory surgery center JV. The remainder of the course will involve 5 - 6 complex health care transactions, using actual documents from recent deals. The transactions run the gamut from hospital M&A to biotech licenses. For the transaction you select, you will work in teams to analyze the deal, and will present your conclusions to the lawyers who closed it. Your final project will be a negotiation or drafting assignment drawn from class materials. The course is taught by Dan Roble (partner emeritus, Ropes & Gray, Boston) and Jeff Heidt (partner at Verrill Dana, Boston), based on the course created by Professor Outterson. PREREQUISITES: The course does not have pre-requisites, but Corporations and Health Care are suggested; if you select the biotech transactions, IP and FDA are suggested. NOTES: This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.