Courses

  • LAW JD 741: Semester-in-Practice: International Human Rights (C)
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Clinical and Experiential Programs Office to enroll. Through the Semester-in-Practice Program: International Human Rights course, students spend a semester working full-time for credit at an Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) committed to the protection of human rights. Recent placements have included the UNHCR and the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights in Berlin. NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: International Human Rights Paper (JD 742).
  • LAW JD 742: Semester-in-Practice: International Human Rights Paper
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Clinical and Experiential Programs Office to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students enrolled in the Semester-in-Practice: International Human Rights course. Students work with a faculty supervisor in designing their own reading list, writing a 15-20 page research paper, and submitting seven 4-6 page bi-weekly journals. NOTE: Students who enroll in this component of the externship may count the credits toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement or the Upper-class writing requirement. It may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: International Human Rights (JD 741).
  • LAW JD 743: NY Pro Bono Scholars: Fieldwork
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Clinical and Experiential Programs Office to enroll. Through the Pro Bono Scholars Program, students spend their spring 3L semester working full-time for credit at a government agency or non-profit providing direct legal services to indigent clients. Participating students sit for the February New York bar exam, and begin their fieldwork the week after. Students passing the bar exam and completing other NY bar and BU Law graduation requirements are admitted to the NY bar in late-June. NOTE: Students who enroll in this program may count the credits toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: NY Pro Bono Scholars Program: Directed Study (JD 744).
  • LAW JD 744: NY Pro Bono Scholars: Directed Study
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Clinical and Experiential Programs Office to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students enrolled in the Pro Bono Scholars Program: Fieldwork course. Students work with a faculty supervisor in designing their own reading list, writing a 15-20 page research paper, and submitting seven 4-6 page bi-weekly journals. COREQUISITE: NY Pro Bono Scholars Program: Fieldwork (JD 743).
  • LAW JD 745: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering - Washington, D.C. (C)
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Clinical and Experiential Programs Office to enroll. Through the Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering -- Washington, D.C., students spend a semester working full-time for credit at an externship placement in D.C. Examples include, but are not limited to, opportunities with the staff of a Congressional committee or subcommittee, in the legal office of an administrative agency, or with a federal board/commission. Externships may be paid or unpaid. Students may secure their own placement or work with Professor Sean Kealy, instructor of the Program, for help in identifying and applying to suitable placements based on the student's career and academic interests. NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering Paper (JD 746).
  • LAW JD 746: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering Paper
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Clinical and Experiential Programs Office to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students enrolled in the Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering -- Washington, D.C. course. Students work with a faculty supervisor in designing their own reading list, writing a 15-20 page research paper, and submitting seven 4-6 page bi-weekly journals. NOTE: Students who enroll in this component of the externship may count the credits toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement or the Upper-class writing requirement. It may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering - Washington, D.C. (JD 745).
  • LAW JD 748: International & Comparative Legal Research
    An important component of understanding international law is mastering all the diverse sources of this area of law. Students will learn to navigate the international system as well as the relevant primary sources of law. Student will learn research strategies and skills for locating treaties, decisions of international tribunals, documents of international organizations and other sources of state practice. Among the organizations the course will discuss the United Nations, the OAS, the EU and the WTO. In addition, students will be introduced to strategies for researching the law of foreign jurisdictions. Students will gain hands-on experience in answering legal research questions in the area of international and comparative law. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using major print, electronic, and web based resources for international law research. NOTE: This class counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 749: Disability Law (S)
    This seminar surveys the evolution of federal law as it relates to people with disabilities. We will cover disability discrimination in the areas of employment, education (elementary and secondary), government services, public accommodations run by private entities, and housing. In exploring these areas we will examine relevant case law and statutes (i.e. the ADA and its amendments, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the IDEA, and the Fair Housing Act) and their implementing regulations and guidance. In addition to studying legal authorities, we will engage in practical classroom exercises and hear from attorneys practicing in disability law-related settings. Readings will be assigned from Colker & Grossman, The Law of Disability Discrimination (8th ed. 2013); Colker & Grossman, The Law of Disability Discrimination Handbook: Statutes and Regulatory Guidance (8th ed. 2013)(also available online), and supplemental material. Grades will be based on class participation and a final paper. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION: A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement with the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 763: Administrative Law Research
    Many practice areas, from environmental law to immigration law, are heavily regulatory. Learn about the structure of administrative law research, from enabling statutes to agency adjudication, in this class. The class will focus on developing your understanding of the structure of administrative agencies and using the various sources of administrative law. You will learn what information is available from government sources and what specialty publishers bring to the table with an emphasis on being cost effective in the workplace. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using the major print, electronic and web based resources in administrative law. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 16 students ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment. Meeting dates -- October 10 to November 28, 2018.
  • LAW JD 766: Environmental Law Practicum (C)
    THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Environmental Law Practicum. Students receive credit for completing environmental law-related legal projects for a Boston-based environmental law organization, such as the Conservation Law Foundation and Alternatives for Community and Environment. Projects will vary in scope and content based on student interest and the needs of the partnering organization. Project topics include clean energy, clean water, and environmental justice, which concerns the intersection of civil rights, fundamental fairness, and environmental policy. Students may also have the opportunity to work on litigation-related matters. Throughout the semester, students will work both under the supervision of an attorney at the partner organization and under the supervision of Professor Pam Hill. Practicum students must attend six class meetings with Professor Hill. Students receive either 1 or 2 graded credits depending on the nature of the project and the anticipated workload. NOTE: This clinic counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.
  • LAW JD 768: Criminal Motion Practice and Advocacy
    Advocacy courses in law school tend to focus on the traditional Trial Advocacy model (opening statements, direct and cross examinations, and closing arguments) or post-trial Appellate Advocacy. The vast majority of cases, however, never reach trial. Criminal Motion Practice and Advocacy will look comprehensively at the pre-trial motions that comprise the bulk of criminal litigation. Students will have the opportunity to research, write, and argue their own pretrial motions against opposing counsel. The course will travel chronologically through the life of a criminal case, beginning at arraignment and focusing on the art of motions practice. In class exercises will include Motions to Dismiss based on the sufficiency of evidence, Motions to Suppress searches and seizures, Motions to Suppress Statements, and Motions to Suppress Identification. NOTES: This class does not satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. This class counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 students. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. PREREQUISITE: Criminal Procedure. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list for a section are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 770: Introduction to Financial Restructuring Practice (S)
    This seminar is designed to provide students with an introductory and practical understanding of certain fundamental aspects of corporate financial restructuring. The seminar focuses on the representation of distressed companies, major creditors, and investors in high-stakes restructuring matters, with an emphasis on (i) comparing out-of-court and in-court restructuring alternatives for distressed companies and their stakeholders; (ii) benefits and risks associated with the commencement and administration of a case under chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code; (iii) the typical timeline, major players, and milestones associated with the chapter 11 process; (iv) strategies for effective restructuring negotiations; and (v) "hot topic" controversies in recent chapter 11 cases. Course materials will consist of recent court decisions and pleadings from noteworthy chapter 11 cases, and select articles concerning significant developments in restructuring law and practice. In addition to class participation, grading will be based upon one term paper of approximately 12 -- 15 pages in length. NOTE: This class does not satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. Meeting dates -- September 6 to November 15, 2018. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 771: Learning From Practice (S)
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Clinical and Experiential Programs Office to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students enrolled in the Learning from Practice: Fieldwork course. This one-hour weekly seminar focuses on the ways in which lawyers develop skills on the job, and identifies best practice for professional development, mentoring, networking, communication, and interacting with clients and the media. The course also examines issues involving diversity, work-life balance, and ethical considerations. The seminar requires students to make a class presentation and keep a reflective journal chronicling their educational experience and reactions to the practice of law observed at the field placement. NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: Learning from Practice: Fieldwork (JD 809). GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option.
  • LAW JD 772: Transaction Simulation: Sale of a Family Business and Related Real Estate
    This course is one of the semester-long transaction simulations offered as part of the School's Transactional Law Program and satisfies the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. The simulated transaction involves the consolidation of ownership of a family-owned retail drugstore company in a manner and through agreements that address the differing expectations and interests of the company's two shareholders: (i) the company's chief executive and majority owner seeking to obtain sole ownership of the business, including interests in real estate used in the business and (ii) his sister, a minority shareholder not active in the business, seeking a risk-free separation from the business and an assured pay-out. The course will consider the respective rights and obligations of these two shareholders as majority and minority owners in a closely held business. The course will also address issues involved in commercial real estate leasing and financing, including negotiating a commercial lease, mortgage and mortgage note from the perspective of each party. The course is intended to expose students to the principal tasks undertaken, and issues faced, by both junior and more senior attorneys in this type of transaction, and in doing so to build skills students will need as they enter transactional practice. The class will be divided into teams, with each team representing one of the participants in the transaction. Students will perform the key analytical, drafting and other legal tasks required to effectively represent their respective clients during various stages of the transaction from inception through closing. The course grade will be based on periodic drafting and other written assignments (individual and the individual's portion of team or group assignments), individual contributions to other team or group efforts, and individual class participation (including oral reports). CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. NOTES: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. The class will also satisfy the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 773: Transaction Simulation: Auction and Sale of a Private Company
    This course is one of the semester-long transaction simulations offered as part of the School's Transactional Law Program and satisfies the Transaction Simulation Requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. The simulated transaction is the auction and sale of a privately-held company in the single-cup coffee brewing industry. The course exposes students to the primary tasks undertaken by both junior and more senior attorneys in a private company auction and sale, and in doing so builds skills students will need as they enter transactional practice. Students will perform analytical, drafting and other legal tasks during each stage of the transaction from inception through closing, including revising and negotiating final terms of a merger agreement for the proposed transaction and preparing the related disclosure schedules. Much of the course work will be done in teams representing the company being sold or a potential purchaser of that company. The course grade will be based on drafting assignments, contributions to team efforts such as in-class presentations and negotiation sessions, and individual class participation. CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. PREREQUISITE: Contract Drafting. PREREQUISITE or COREQUISITE: Corporations. NOTES: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. The class will also satisfy the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 774: Transaction Simulation: Acquisition of Urban Real Estate for Major Commercial Re-Development
    This course is one of the semester-long transaction simulations offered as part of the School's Transactional Law Program and satisfies the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. The simulated transaction involves the sale of an urban site in Cambridge, MA comprised of buildings currently or previously occupied by commercial tenants which is to be re-developed into a high-end mixed-use multi-family and retail building. The course is intended to expose students to various transactional, regulatory and other issues faced, and lawyering tasks undertaken, by both junior and more senior attorneys in this type of transaction, and to enable students, in performing these tasks, to develop important practice skills in the area of commercial real estate. The class will be divided into teams at various stages of the transaction, with each team representing the buyer or the seller, regarding the acquisition of the property, or the local developer or capital partner regarding forming the venture that will acquire this property. Students will perform the key analytical, drafting and other legal tasks required to effectively represent their respective clients during various stages of the transaction from inception through closing. Throughout the semester students will be able to interact with a variety of real estate developers and experts. The course grade will be based on periodic drafting, negotiating and other written assignments (both in-class and homework), contributions to team efforts, and individual class participation. CLASS SIZE: Limited to 12 students. NOTES: This course counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. The class will also satisfy the Transaction Simulation requirement of the Transactional Practice Concentration. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 775: Reproductive Justice (S)
    This seminar explores Reproductive Justice ("RJ") as a paradigm for understanding reproductive oppression -- that is, the subordination of individuals through their bodies, sexualities, and abilities to reproduce. The RJ paradigm picks up where a reproductive rights framework ends. It contends that the fight for equality and dignity in matters relating to reproduction continues beyond a successful argument that the Constitution ought to protect a "right" to privacy, "right" to access contraception, or "right" to an abortion. An RJ framework observes that "rights" are given meaning -- and lose meaning -- according to the race, class, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, immigration status, and physical and mental ability (among other attributes) of the rights bearer. As such, RJ analyzes reproductive experiences within a complex context and with respect to the multiple statuses of the persons involved. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15 students GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 776: Intellectual Property Workshop (S)
    This seminar examines topics from the frontiers of intellectual property law ("IP" law). The class provides students with the opportunity to meet and interact with cutting-edge IP scholars who will be invited to speak. Students will read the speakers' research and works in progress, critique those writings in papers and/or in oral give-and-take discussions with the authors, and will be provided additional reading as appropriate. The goals of this seminar workshop are three: for students to deepen their substantive knowledge of IP law, for students to increase their abilities to participate in scholarly debate and potentially publish their own work, and for established scholars to improve their papers through the input of the workshop group. Ideally, students should have taken or be concurrently enrolled in a course in IP, Copyright, Patent, or Trademark. Students who have not taken such a course (or who are not enrolled currently in such a course) must obtain the permission of the instructor. The seminar offers a variety of writing options. Papers of suitable depth and scope are potentially capable of fulfilling both the IPIL Concentration writing requirement and the JD Upper Class Writing Requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 777: Education Law and Policy (S)
    This seminar considers the legal and policy framework of K-12 public education. During the first two-thirds of the meetings, we will study the historical development of public education; school desegregation and resegregation; school finance; federalism, localism, and accountability efforts; achievement gap and equity reforms such as school choice, charters, and vouchers; single-sex public education and other identity-based public schooling; commitments to students with disabilities; and bullying. For the final third of the course, students will work in pairs to develop a topic for further research, evaluation, and problem-solving, and present their work in person and in writing to the class. Students will leave this course with a foundation in substantive education law and policy, and develop and practice the following skills: oral communication, written communication, law and policy analysis, and collaboration. This is a reading and writing intensive course. NOTES: This class does not satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 778: Introduction to Risk Management and Compliance
    This course covers the core legal concepts underlying compliance -- the new paradigm in corporate accountability -- and its impact on transnational business operations. We will examine the Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations; the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the Sarbanes Oxley Act, as well as guidance issued by the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission. You'll learn how to: * Identify an enterprise's compliance obligations; * Assess the legal risks associated with those obligations; * Build a compliance and ethics program that effectively mitigates legal risk; and, * Generate value through compliance and ethics.