Courses

  • LAW JD 726: Health Care Fraud and Abuse (S)
    This seminar will use a practical, case-study approach to some of the issues arising in the complex world of health care enforcement and compliance. With emphasis on the procedural mechanisms of the False Claims Act and the substantive law of the Anti-Kickback Act, the Stark I and II laws, the Food Drug and Cosmetic Act, and the government's remedial authorities, the seminar will explore how prosecutors, defense attorneys, whistleblowers, and compliance officials inside health care companies approach their work and advise their clients. The seminar will explore the relationships between regulated industries (e.g., pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, doctors, medical device companies) and government insurance programs (e.g., Medicaid and Medicare), why these relationships generate billions of dollars every year in fraud, and how the interested constituencies are approaching these issues. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION: A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement with the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 students. OFFERING PATTERN: This class is not offered every year. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 730: Employment Law Research
    Employment law research involves understanding a range of sources of law from statutes and regulations to case and contract law. Students in this class will learn how to locate the many intertwined sources of employment law while learning how the agencies responsible for enforcement work. Students will learn how to use databases to research law in this context as well as how to find government sources. Classes will involve hands-on activities that will simulate problems students will encounter in practice. These problems will help students to become comfortable researching and finding answers to the particular questions in the employment law setting. NOTE: This class satisfies the upper-class Professional Skills requirement and counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. Meeting Dates: February 28 to April 25.
  • LAW JD 731: Critical Race Theory (S)
    This seminar explores the utility of Critical Race Theory to the study of law. Specifically, this seminar analyzes the centrality of the law in constructing and maintaining -- as well as dismantling -- racism, racial inequalities, and race itself. The latter part of the seminar will consist of a sustained analysis of Critical Race Theory as it speaks to issues of gender and reproduction. Students will write a research paper; with the permission of the instructor, this paper may satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 733: Intellectual Property Law Research
    Intellectual property is a multi-faceted area of practice where it is especially important to be able to keep up with current developments. Students will become familiar with practitioners' tools as well as learning the role of legislative history, sources for securing intellectual property rights and patent and trademark searching. Legal information and technologies are constantly changing, and firms are constantly licensing new databases. Become familiar with the specialized tools used by lawyers in intellectual property practices. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using major print, electronic, and web based resources for intellectual property law research. NOTE: This class satisfies the upper-class Professional Skills requirement and counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. NOTE: Students may not add this course after the first class has been held. This course meets January 16 through February 27.
  • LAW JD 735: Judicial Externship: Fieldwork (C)
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. Students receive credit for working in chambers for a judge in the state or federal court system. The assignments handled by an extern are similar to those handled during a post-graduate clerkship. Students may find their own judicial placements that must be approved by the Office of Experiential Education, or the Office will match the student with a judge. Students receive 4-9 variable P/F credits for their fieldwork, as determined in consultation with their placement supervisors. Each credit requires 50 hours of work over the course of the 13-week semester (averaging 4 hours per week). NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: Judicial Externship: Seminar (JD 736).
  • LAW JD 736: Judicial Externship: Judicial Process Seminar
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students simultaneously enrolled in the Judicial Externship: Fieldwork course. The two-hour weekly seminar examines legal ethics from the perspective of the judiciary, including topics such as conflicts of interest, competency, confidentiality, pro bono obligations, and judicial ethics. The class also focuses on the legal and philosophical foundations of judicial decision-making, specialty courts, alternative dispute resolution, and legal research and writing. The seminar requires students to write a 15-page paper and make a class presentation. In addition, each student keeps a reflective journal chronicling their educational experience and reactions to the practice of law observed at the field placement. NOTE: Students who enroll in this component of the externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement or the Professional Responsibility requirement. It may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. COREQUISITE: Judicial Externship: Fieldwork (JD 735). GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option.
  • LAW JD 739: Semester-in-Practice: Independent Proposal (C)
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. Through the Semester-in-Practice: Independent Proposal students develop their own proposal to spend a semester working full-time for credit at an externship placement, local or away from Boston. Qualifying placements include the legal departments of a non-profit, government agency, private company, or at a law firm (working on pro bono projects only). Externships may be paid or unpaid. NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Independent Proposal Paper (JD 740).
  • LAW JD 740: Semester-in-Practice: Independent Paper
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students enrolled in the Semester-in-Practice: Independent Proposal course. Students work with a faculty supervisor in designing their own reading list, writing a 15-20 page research paper, and submitting seven 4-6 page bi-weekly journals. NOTE: Students who enroll in this component of the externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement or the Upper-class writing requirement. It may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Independent Proposal (JD 739).
  • LAW JD 741: Semester-in-Practice: International Human Rights (C)
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. Through the Semester-in-Practice Program: International Human Rights course, students spend a semester working full-time for credit at an Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) committed to the protection of human rights. Recent placements have included the UNHCR and the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights in Berlin. NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: International Human Rights Paper (JD 742).
  • LAW JD 742: Semester-in-Practice: International Human Rights Paper
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students enrolled in the Semester-in-Practice: International Human Rights course. Students work with a faculty supervisor in designing their own reading list, writing a 15-20 page research paper, and submitting seven 4-6 page bi-weekly journals. NOTE: Students who enroll in this component of the externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement or the Upper-class writing requirement. It may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: International Human Rights (JD 741).
  • LAW JD 743: PRO BONO SCHOLARS: FIELDWORK
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. Through the Pro Bono Scholars Program, students spend their spring 3L semester working full-time for credit at a government agency or non-profit providing direct legal services to indigent clients. Participating students sit for the February New York bar exam, and begin their fieldwork the week after. Students passing the bar exam and completing other NY bar and BU Law graduation requirements are admitted to the NY bar in late-June. COREQUISITE: Pro Bono Scholars Program: Paper (JD 744).
  • LAW JD 744: PRO BONO SCHOLARS: IND. STUDY PAPER
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students enrolled in the Pro Bono Scholars Program: Fieldwork course. Students work with a faculty supervisor in designing their own reading list, writing a 15-20 page research paper, and submitting seven 4-6 page bi-weekly journals. COREQUISITE: Pro Bono Scholars Program: Fieldwork (JD 743).
  • LAW JD 745: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering - Washington, D.C. (C)
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. Through the Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering -- Washington, D.C., students spend a semester working full-time for credit at an externship placement in D.C. Examples include, but are not limited to, opportunities with the staff of a Congressional committee or subcommittee, in the legal office of an administrative agency, or with a federal board/commission. Externships may be paid or unpaid. Students may secure their own placement or work with Professor Sean Kealy, instructor of the Program, for help in identifying and applying to suitable placements based on the student's career and academic interests. NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering Paper (JD 746).
  • LAW JD 746: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering Paper
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students enrolled in the Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering -- Washington, D.C. course. Students work with a faculty supervisor in designing their own reading list, writing a 15-20 page research paper, and submitting seven 4-6 page bi-weekly journals. NOTE: Students who enroll in this component of the externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement or the Upper-class writing requirement. It may not be used to satisfy more than one requirement. COREQUISITE: Semester-in-Practice: Government Lawyering - Washington, D.C. (JD 745).
  • LAW JD 748: International & Comparative Legal Research
    An important component of understanding international law is mastering all the diverse sources of this area of law. Students will learn to navigate the international system as well as the relevant primary sources of law. Student will learn research strategies and skills for locating treaties, decisions of international tribunals, documents of international organizations and other sources of state practice. Among the organizations the course will discuss the United Nations, the OAS, the EU and the WTO. In addition, students will be introduced to strategies for researching the law of foreign jurisdictions. Students will gain hands-on experience in answering legal research questions in the area of international and comparative law. Classes will combine instruction and hands-on exercises using major print, electronic, and web based resources for international law research. NOTE: This class satisfies the upper-class Professional Skills requirement and counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement.
  • LAW JD 749: Disability Law (S)
    This seminar surveys the evolution of federal law as it relates to people with disabilities. We will cover disability discrimination in the areas of employment, education (elementary, secondary and higher education), government services, public accommodations run by private entities, and housing. In exploring these areas we will examine relevant case law and statutes (i.e. the ADA and its amendments, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the IDEA, and the Fair Housing Act) and their implementing regulations and guidance. In addition to studying legal authorities, we will engage in practical classroom exercises and hear from attorneys practicing in disability law-related settings. Readings will be assigned from Colker & Grossman, The Law of Disability Discrimination (8th ed. 2013); Colker & Grossman, The Law of Disability Discrimination Handbook: Statutes and Regulatory Guidance (8th ed. 2013)(also available online), and supplemental material. Grades will be based on class participation and a final paper. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION: A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement with the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 762: Health Law Externship: Fieldwork (C)
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. Students receive credit for working at a public agency, a non-profit, or a private health care organization. Placements may be paid or unpaid. Prior to the beginning of the semester, the course instructor, Mr. Ben Moulton, works with students to identify suitable field placements depending on each student's individual interests and career goals. Once possible placements are identified, students are responsible for applying and being accepted to those organizations. Students receive 3-9 variable P/F credits for their fieldwork, as determined in consultation with their placement supervisors. Each credit requires 50 hours of work over the course of the 13-week semester (averaging 4 hours per week). NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: Health Law Externship: Seminar (JD 764).
  • LAW JD 764: Health Law Externship Seminar
    This CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have received permission from the Office of Experiential Education to enroll. This is the companion academic component for students enrolled in the Health Law Externship: Fieldwork course. The one-hour weekly seminar examines various health law issues as well as the challenges of working in a health care environment. The first meeting will orient you to the program; subsequent meetings will discuss the assigned readings in light of your experiences in the externship. The seminar requires students to write a paper and make a class presentation. In addition, each student keeps a reflective journal chronicling their educational experience and reactions to the practice of law observed at the field placements. NOTE: Students who enroll in this externship may count the credits towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. COREQUISITE: Health Law Externship Program: Fieldwork (JD 762). GRADING NOTICE: This class does not offer the CR/NC/H option.
  • LAW JD 766: Environmental Law Practicum (C)
    THIS CLASS IS RESTRICTED to students who have formally applied to and been accepted to the Environmental Law Practicum. Students receive credit for completing environmental law-related legal projects for a Boston-based environmental law organization, such as the Conservation Law Foundation and Alternatives for Community and Environment. Projects will vary in scope and content based on student interest and the needs of the partnering organization. Project topics include clean energy, clean water, and environmental justice, which concerns the intersection of civil rights, fundamental fairness, and environmental policy. Students may also have the opportunity to work on litigation-related matters. Throughout the semester, students will work both under the supervision of an attorney at the partner organization and under the supervision of Professor Pam Hill. Practicum students must attend six class meetings with Professor Hill. Students receive either 1 or 2 graded credits depending on the nature of the project and the anticipated workload. NOTE: This clinic satisfies the upper-class professional skills requirement and counts towards the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option.
  • LAW JD 768: Criminal Motion Practice and Advocacy
    Advocacy courses in law school tend to focus on the traditional Trial Advocacy model (opening statements, direct and cross examinations, and closing arguments) or post-trial Appellate Advocacy. The vast majority of cases, however, never reach trial. Criminal Motion Practice and Advocacy will look comprehensively at the pre-trial motions that comprise the bulk of criminal litigation. Students will have the opportunity to research, write, and argue their own pretrial motions against opposing counsel. The course will travel chronologically through the life of a criminal case, beginning at arraignment and focusing on the art of motions practice. In class exercises will include Motions to Dismiss based on the sufficiency of evidence, Motions to Suppress searches and seizures, Motions to Suppress Statements, and Motions to Suppress Identification. NOTES: This class does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. This class satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement and counts toward the 6 credit Experiential Learning requirement. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 students. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. PREREQUISITE: Criminal Procedure. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT: A student who fails to attend the first class or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the class. Students who are on the wait list for a section are required to attend the first meeting to be considered for enrollment.