Courses

  • LAW BK 995: Consumer Financial Services
    This class presents an overview of the laws relating to traditional and innovative consumer financial products and services, including the impact of the new consumer protection provisions of the Dodd-Frank banking law on creditors and consumers. The course focuses on federal consumer financial laws governing installment, revolving, and real estate lending, credit and debit cards; and ATM networks, point of sale payment systems, home banking, stored value and prepaid cards; and other deposit and loan products and services. The course examines the design of retail financial products and considers operational issues, the regulatory framework, and consumer protection laws including The Consumer Financial Protection Act, Truth in Lending, Equal Credit Opportunity, Community Reinvestment Acts, and federal and state laws governing fair credit reporting, trade practices, usury, electronic funds transfers, and funds availability.
  • LAW JD 605: Business Fundamentals
    Introduction to Business Fundamentals is an online, self-paced, asynchronous program forming a required part of the JD curriculum. The curriculum consists of modules covering business basics, corporate finance and financial accounting, including the following subjects: capital markets; the basics of financial reporting; balance sheets; income statements and cash flow; business forms and organizations; financing organizations; discounting; and calculating risk, return and valuation. Assessment is based on multiple choice exams. Students may opt-out of the course if they score an 85% or better on the pre-course exam. A score of 70% or better on the post-course exam, following successful completion of the course, is necessary to meet the requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course awards no credits and is graded CR/NC. It is a graduation requirement for JD students who will be graduating with the Class of 2017 or later. Students may enroll in the program for the fall, spring or summer semesters, but should complete the course by the conclusion of the fall semester of the 3L year.
  • LAW JD 606: Legislation
    Examines the lawmaking process in legislatures, theories and rules of statutory interpretation in the courts, and the relationships among statutory law, administrative law, common law, and constitutional law.
  • LAW JD 607: Lawyering Lab
    The one-week intensive Lawyering Lab guides students to bring to bear legal concepts, core practice competencies and practical judgment to address simulated client problems and achieve a client's objectives within the bounds of the law --the essence of what clients hire attorneys to do. This is done through lectures to provide necessary background, but more importantly through interactive discussion and "hands-on" exercises--both in and outside of class--that require students to actually do what lawyers do in solving client problems and achieving their objectives. This includes (1) determining the client's goals; (2) determining the legal constraints and opportunities that affect the client's ability to get what it wants; (3) determining the relevant facts; (4) identifying multiple options for action; (5) assessing the various options to generate possible recommendations, (6) counseling the client; and (7) negotiating and drafting agreements. 1 credit, pass-fail.
  • LAW JD 700: Introduction to American Law
    The class covers the basic structure and function of US legal institutions: the congress, the president, and regulatory agencies, and, especially, the federal courts. It examines the role of state law and state courts in the American system of federalism. The course also studies the American judicial processes of constitutional analyses, interpretation of statues, and development of common law. Some attention is paid to court procedures, including trial by jury. Finally, students study a few topics that are illustrative of the treatment of individual rights in American law, such as freedom of speech, anti-discrimination law, and protection of private property. The class grants two credits towards the American Law degree.
  • LAW JD 701: Prof Resp/Llm
  • LAW JD 702: Property for LL.M. Students
    This course exposes LL.M. students to the basic principles of real property law, including possession, ownership, rights in land, conveyances, estates, future interests, real estate contracts, easements, land use disputes, landlord-tenant issues, and land use controls, among others. The course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of the essential doctrines of real property law for LL.M. students interested in taking a U.S. bar exam.
  • LAW JD 703: Evidence for LLM Students
    This course provides LL.M. students with an overview of the substantive rules governing the admissibility or exclusion of evidence at trial. Subjects include competency of witnesses, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, the rule against hearsay and its exceptions, expert and lay opinion testimony, privileged communications, relevancy, procedural considerations, judicial notice, burden of proof, presumptions, form and type of objections, authentication, the best evidence rule and the use of demonstrative and scientific evidence. The course is designed to give students a fundamental understanding of evidentiary rules in anticipation of taking a US bar exam.
  • LAW JD 704: Tutorial
  • LAW JD 705: Cr Culture Ext
  • LAW JD 706: Writing Supplements
    Students enrolled in selected upper-class courses have the option of enrolling in one-credit Writing Supplements to these courses. Designed for students who are interested in practicing in the areas covered by the course, these one-credit supplements are taught by experienced attorneys who practice in these areas. In collaboration with the professor teaching the substantive course, the practitioner instructs students in drafting documents related to the substantive coursework. For example, a writing supplement to a family law class could include separation agreements, custody agreements or restraining orders. Writing sections consist of one introductory meeting and a number of follow up meetings (specific dates TBD) to discuss drafts in progress. Because enrollment is limited, you will receive substantial feedback and individualized instruction. NOTE: This seminar satisfies the upper-class professional skills requirement. NOTE: Fall 2014 Section A1 - Supplement to Trusts, Wills & Basic Estate Planning. Fall 2014 Section B1 - Supplement to Family Law. Spring 2015 Section C1 - Supplement to Trusts, Wills & Basic Estate Planning.
  • LAW JD 707: Human Trafficking
    This course is required for students accepted to the Human Trafficking Clinic (JD708). The course will examine international, federal, and state mechanisms to combat human trafficking. The course will also evaluate comparative models for criminal prosecution and protection of survivors. The course will explore serious enforcement challenges in a variety of contexts, including victim compensation, employment rights, immigration relief, and criminal prosecution. Moreover, the class will receive training in client counseling techniques, focusing on the unique challenges when working with vulnerable communities, such as trafficking survivors. PREREQUISITE/COREQUISITE: Immigration Law (JD968) and Evidence (JD831).
  • LAW JD 708: Human Trafficking Clinic
    The Human Trafficking Clinic offers a unique opportunity for students to work on legal cases of human trafficking, a widespread and serious human rights violation. Clinic students provide a variety of legal services, including direct representation of non-citizens trafficked into the United States, advocacy for trafficking survivors, and community education and training. In particular, Clinic students directly represent trafficking survivors to apply for a T-visa, a special form of immigration relief for trafficking survivors and/or in removal (deportation) proceedings before the Boston Immigration Court. Students also will collaborate with a variety of stakeholders, including survivors of human trafficking, law enforcement, government officials, and non-governmental organizations, to identify solutions to combat human trafficking. Through their clinical experience, students will increase their knowledge of trafficking law and learn fundamentals of lawyering, while providing a valuable service to survivors who would otherwise be unrepresented. The Human Trafficking Course examines international, federal, and state mechanisms to combat human trafficking. The course also evaluates comparative models for criminal prosecution and protection of survivors. The course will explore serious enforcement challenges in a variety of contexts, including victim compensation, employment rights, immigration relief, and criminal prosecution. Moreover, the class will receive training in client counseling techniques, focusing on the unique challenges when working with vulnerable communities, such as trafficking survivors. To apply: Applications will be available on-line following the Open House. Applications will be due April 19, 2014. CO-REQUISITE: Students must also register for JD 707.
  • LAW JD 709: Independent Proposal Externship: Fieldwork (C)
    This is a clinical progam. Students must apply and be accepted before registering for this course. Through the Independent Proposal Externship, students may receive credit for an externship done in conjunction with an independent study project. This option is available to students only if there are no spots available in one of our other externship offerings. The Fieldwork Students receive 3-5 variable credits for the fieldwork, determined as follows: 3 credits = 150 hours total (about 12 hrs/wk); 4 credits = 200 hours total (about 15-16 hrs/wk); 5 credits = 250 hours total (about 20 hrs/wk). Qualifying internships may be at a non-profit, government, or in-house counsel placement. An internship may be at a law firm, but only if the student works solely on pro bono assignments. For all placements, the student must be supervised by an attorney, and must work on projects typically handled by an attorney. COREQUISITE: INDEPENDENT PROPOSAL EXTERNSHIP: PAPER (LAW JD 710)
  • LAW JD 710: Independent Proposal Externship: Paper
    This is a clinical program. Students must apply and be accepted before registering for this course. Students work under the guidance of a faculty member and earn three credits for writing a paper and submitting journals. The paper must be at least 30 pages in length. There are eight journals due (5-7 pages each). Students may satisfy the upperclass writing requirement through the paper, under agreement of the sponsoring faculty member. COREQUISITE: INDEPENDENT PROPOSAL EXTERNSHIP (LAW JD 709).
  • LAW JD 711: Judicial Writing (S)
    This course will focus on writing styles and formats unique to the judicial process, such as the bench memo and appellate majority and dissenting opinion. Classes will provide a general overview of the opinion writing function with emphasis on topics such as opinion structure, judicial writing style, the relationship between style and substance, the use of narrative and rhetorical techniques, and ethical considerations in opinion writing. Through a series of writing assignments and in-class exercises, students will learn to how to diagnose and revise difficult and unclear writing, acquire techniques for writing more economically, precisely and unambiguously, and hone their skills in structuring and organizing, analyzing, and writing persuasively. In analyzing judicial opinions and writing from the perspective of a judge rather than an advocate, students will gain a deeper understanding of the judicial process and will become better critical readers and users of judicial opinions. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 14 students. NOTES: This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 712: Legal Writing for Civil Litigation (S)
    This class is designed to give students a variety of legal writing experiences, all related to civil litigation. Students will draft a variety of documents, including discovery-related documents, pleadings, and motions. Students will complete multiple drafts of these documents, meet individually with the instructor to discuss the drafts, and engage in peer editing of their classmates' papers. Students will work with a single fact pattern throughout the semester, and will conduct extensive research as part of the course. In class, students will discuss litigation strategy, research skills and ethical and professional concerns. In addition, the class will also include in-class writing exercises designed to improve the students' writing skills. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 18 students. NOTES: This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This seminar does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 713: Persuasive Writing (S)
    This seminar will focus on improving students' persuasive writing skills through a series of assignments and in-class exercises. Students will draft a variety of documents designed to persuade, including a statement of the facts and memos in support of motions. Some legal research will be necessary for these assignments, but the emphasis will be on writing, not on research. Students will complete multiple drafts of these documents, meet individually with the instructor to discuss the drafts, and engage in peer editing of their classmates' papers to improve their own writing skills. The class will also include discussions of persuasive writing strategies, comparisons of examples of good and bad persuasive writing, and in-class writing exercises. Students will be graded on the basis of their written work, their peer editing work, and on their classroom participation. There will be no final exam. ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 14 students. NOTES: This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 715: Constitutional History: The Founding Years (S)
    This seminar will investigate constitutional history, from the years leading to the American Revolution through the coming of the Civil War, from several different angles, including presidential leadership, judicial interpretation, and legislative mandates. We will also consider how society at large debated, influenced, and helped shape the early Republic and its constitutionalism, paying particular attention to the themes of fluidity, contingency, and participation, and to the meaning of the phrase, "sovereignty of the people." We will examine how law, society, and politics inextricably mixed to set American constitutional development on particular paths that were not predetermined. Topics to be covered will include constitutional thought before and during the Revolution, the constitutional impact of the break with Britain, the origins and drafting of the Constitution, the political thought of various Founders, the development and implications of judicial review, launching the Republic during the administrations of Washington, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison, and the growth of democracy in the Republic in the aftermath of the War of 1812. No prior history background is necessary. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION: A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement with the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. OFFERING PATTERN: This class is not offered every year. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.**
  • LAW JD 719: Transactional Contracts: Drafting and Analyzing Transactional Agreements under U.S. Law (for foreign-trained LL.M. students)
    This course is for foreign-trained LL.M. students. It teaches students basic principles and skills of drafting and analyzing transaction and other business agreements under U.S. law, with a focus on recognizing, and addressing through contractual provisions, key business issues in various transactional contexts, including asset purchases and sales, intellectual property licensing and employment agreements. While the course utilizes lectures to introduce various contract concepts and techniques essential for drafting and analyzing transaction and other commercial agreements, it requires that students complete in-class exercises and homework assignments as a means of building basic drafting skills and a solid understanding of the structure and operation of contractual provisions in a business transaction under U.S. law. Grades will be based on the graded assignments, good faith completion of ungraded assignments, and class participation.