Courses

  • LAW JD 988: Mergers and Acquisitions
    This course will cover the principal legal, tax and business issues of mergers and acquisitions. PREREQUISITE: Corporations or permission of instructor.
  • LAW JD 989: Jessup Moot Court: Problem Solving in International Law
    This course is restricted to students who applied and were accepted as participants for the Jessup Moot Court competition. A full description can be found here: https://www.bu.edu/law/current-students/jd-student-resources/legal-writing-appellate-advocacy-programs/appellate-advocacy-program-competitions/jessup-moot-court-competition/
  • LAW JD 991: International Human Rights (S)
    This is an introductory course to international human rights. The course will introduce students to the concepts of human rights, and the instruments that have codified and provided content to those concepts in the last sixty years. We will examine such questions as: Is there such a thing as human rights law? What standards, mechanisms, monitoring or enforcement machinery exists to make human rights concepts "legal"? Is there such a thing as universal consensus on human rights, or are the concepts relative from one region to the next? What, if any, constraints does human rights law place on the actions of sovereign states? How does the UN machinery operate in human rights law-making, monitoring and enforcement? What is the role of regional organizations, domestic courts and international entities in developing, promoting and implementing human rights norms? The course will take a contextualized approach using cases and current situations to address these questions primarily from a human rights perspective. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION: A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar, or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 993: Creating the Constitution (S)
    Using an eclectic collection of primary and secondary source materials, this seminar conducts an in-depth historical examination of the American constitutional founding in 1787. Anyone interested in what the Constitution meant when it was created is encouraged to enroll. Initial sessions set the scene with discussions of the eighteenth-century imperial constitutional framework, constitutional controversies during the imperial struggle in the 1760s, and the creation of the American state constitutions during the Revolution. In the seminar's core sessions, we explore the crisis of the Critical Period, the Constitution's drafting history, and the central issues debated during the ratification contest. Finally, the seminar examines the first federal administrative state established under the Constitution, as well as some of the constitutional controversies that arose in the immediate post-ratification years. At various points throughout we reflect on how the historical perspectives revealed in the readings and discussions bear on modern-day interpretive issues and methodologies. Grades will be based on seminar participation and a research paper. LIMITED WRITING REQUIREMENT OPTION: A limited number of students may be permitted to satisfy the upper-class writing requirement with the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. GRADING NOTICE: This class will not offer the CR/NC/H option. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 994: American Indian Law
    This is a survey course of the laws and policies influencing American Indians in the United States today. We will review the tortured history of the relationship between American Indians and the United States government and discuss the complex legal and policy issues surrounding civil and criminal jurisdiction and environmental, land use and economic development issues on and off the Reservation. We will focus on the powers of the respective players in each of these fields, including local and state government, the federal government and tribal governments. OFFERING PATTERN: This class is not offered every year. Students are advised to take this into account when planning their long-term schedule.
  • LAW JD 996: International Criminal Law (S)
    This seminar will explore the crimes for which individuals incur direct criminal liability under contemporary international law, as well as selected major issues in transnational cooperation and arrangements for the prosecution of crimes that transcend national borders. In particular, it will consider (i) what crimes qualify as international in this sense, general principles of international criminal jurisdiction, and the historical evolution of the field from its genesis after World War I to Nuremburg to the permanent International Criminal Court established in 2002; (ii) the statutory and tribunal jurisprudence defining the nature and scope of liability for core international crimes, viz., genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes; (iii) modern debates over other, often controversial, international crimes, including aggression and terrorism; (iv) the minimal requirements and forms of individual criminal responsibility for international crimes; and (v) selected defenses and immunities. Prior knowledge of or coursework in international law would be helpful but is not a pre- or co-requisitie. A limited number of students may, with the instructor's permission, fulfill the upper-class writing requirement through this seminar. ** A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar, or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, will be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW JD 998: Health Care Transactions (S)
    Partners, associates and general counsel from leading firms will discuss the deals they were personally involved in. After an introduction to joint venture theory and the regulatory context of health care, everyone in the class examines 2 transactions: a physician recruiting agreement and an ambulatory surgery center JV. The remainder of the course will involve 5 -- 6 complex health care transactions, using actual documents from recent deals. The transactions run the gamut from hospital M&A to biotech licenses. For the transaction you select, you will work in teams to analyze the deal, and will present your conclusions to the lawyers who closed it. Your final project will be a negotiation or drafting assignment drawn from class materials. PREREQUISITES: The course does not have pre-requisites, but Corporations and Health Care are suggested; if you select the biotech transactions, IP and FDA are suggested. NOTES: This seminar satisfies the Upper-class Professional Skills requirement. This seminar does not satisfy the Upper-class Writing Requirement. GRADING NOTICE: This course does not offer the CR/NC/H option. **A student who fails to attend the initial meeting of a seminar (designated by an (S) in the title), or to obtain permission to be absent from either the instructor or the Registrar, may be administratively dropped from the seminar. Students who are on a wait list for a seminar are required to attend the first seminar meeting to be considered for enrollment.
  • LAW LE 650: Legal English 1
  • LAW LE 651: Academic Skills
    This course description is currently under construction.
  • LAW LE 652: Legal Cult
    This course description is currently under construction.
  • LAW LE 653: Legal English 2
  • LAW LE 654: Legal Writing
  • LAW LE 655: Persuasive Advo
    This course description is currently under construction.
  • LAW LE 656: Topics Amer LAW
    This course description is currently under construction.
  • LAW LE 657: Skills U.S.LAW
    This course description is currently under construction.
  • LAW TX 901: Federal Income Taxation I
    This course presents a general introduction to the fundamentals of federal income tax, emphasizing issues common to individual taxpayers (but not including the federal income tax aspects of the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of property, which are the subject of Federal Income Taxation II). Topics include an overview of the federal tax system; gross income, inclusions, and exclusions; identity of the proper taxpayer; concepts and categories of deductions; and basic timing principles.
  • LAW TX 902: Federal Income Taxation II
    Federal income tax aspects of the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of property. Topics include: 1.Realization and recognition, 2.Basis and amount realized, 3.The effects of debt (including its cancellation), 4.Depreciation and amortization, 5.At risk, not for profit, and passive activity loss deductibility limitations, 6.Capital gains and losses, related party transactions, quasi-capital assets and depreciation recapture, and 7.Deferred payment transactions (original issue discount and installment sales). Prerequisite or corequisite: Federal Income Taxation I.
  • LAW TX 904: Estate and Gift Taxation
    Principle issues of estate and gift taxation. Topics include the definition of taxable gifts and exclusions and deductions; determination of the taxable estate of a decedent including problems with lifetime transfers; valuation issues; deductions from the taxable estate with special emphasis on property passing to a spouse; and transfers with retained interests. Reference is made throughout to planning issues relating to estate and gift taxation and is designed to give both a requisite background for those intending additional study of estate planning and a comfortable familiarity with the subject for those going on to other tax fields.
  • LAW TX 905: ERISA Regulation of Retirement Plans
    Regulation of pension and profit sharing plans by the Internal Revenue Code and Employee Retirement Income Security Act, with particular attention to rules applicable to tax-qualified pension and profit-sharing plans, including rules governing the structure of benefits and taxation of contributions and distributions.
  • LAW TX 906: Tax Aspects of International Business
    Tax aspects of international business transactions, both "inbound" and "outbound", with particular attention to fiscal jurisdiction, the foreign tax credit, allocation of income among affiliated companies, treaties, anti-abuse measures aimed at tax haven operations, information reporting and foreign investment in U.S. securities and real estate.