English

  • GRS EN 604: History of Criticism 1
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    A historical survey of western literary-critical standards from the earliest surviving formulations in classical Athens to the dawn of the twentieth century. Writers include Plato, Aristotle, Dante, Johnson, Hegel, Nietzsche, Du Bois, Freud; questions of truth, rhetoric, pleasure, selfhood, politics.
  • GRS EN 606: Literary Criticism II
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    Survey of literary critical perspectives and trends in humanistic theory relevant to literary interpretation from the middle of the twentieth century onward, including formalism, structuralism, post-structuralism, gender studies, new historicism, and post-colonial studies. Frequent writing assignments of varying lengths.
  • GRS EN 665: Critical Studies in Literature and Society Topic for Fall 2011: Enlightenment In America
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    A literary introduction to some varieties of Enlightenment in the Americas. Reading essays, sermons, novels, poems, and objects produced between 1690 and 1845, course traces the ideologies and technologies of "Progress" in Britain's Colonies, the Caribbean, and the United States
  • GRS EN 675: Critical Studies in Literature and Gender: Representing Gender in American Literature and Film
    Gender representations in American literature, film, and graphic novels from the 1950's through the present. Works include Lolita, Catcher in the Rye, Streetcar Named Desire, Diary of a Teenage Girl, and Paris is Burning.
  • GRS EN 684: Crst Lit&Ethnic
  • GRS EN 693: Crst Lit & Arts
  • GRS EN 695: Critical Studies in Literary Topics
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    Topic for Fall 2016: Time and Literature 1800-1930. From 1800-1930, momentous changes in technology (railway, telegraph, photography) and science (geology, Darwin, Einstein) inspired a re-conception of time. This course examines narrative time in Byron, Wordsworth, Hardy, Woolf and Proust in relation to these strange new ideas about time.
  • GRS EN 696: Critical Studies in Literary Topics
    Graduate Prerequisites: graduate standing.
    Topic for Spring 2012: Animals and Literature Since 1800. Can we cast ourselves into the inner lives of alien creatures, from amoebas to elephants? Animals in literature and film, and theoretical shifts in the category of animal. Authors include Byron, Hardy, Darwin, Woolf, and Kafka.
  • GRS EN 699: Teaching College English I
    The goals, contents, and methods of instruction in English. General teaching-learning issues. Required of all teaching fellows.
  • GRS EN 705: Seminar: The Writing of Plays 1
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom one act or a full-length play must be submitted in the period just before classes begin.
    A workshop in the writing of plays. Manuscripts are read using professional actors from the Boston community, and plays are discussed in class. Individual conferences. Limited enrollment.
  • GRS EN 706: Seminar: The Writing of Plays 2
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom one act or a full-length play must be submitted during the period just before classes begin.
    A workshop in the writing of plays. Manuscripts are read using professional actors from the Boston community, and plays are discussed in class. Individual conferences. Limited enrollment.
  • GRS EN 717: Before Class: Early Modern Distinctions
    The symbolic violence of social distinctions (gender, wealth, religion, race, occupation, learning, birth, accent, etc. etc.) among Elizabethans. Tudor-Stuart works, high and low genres from humanist philosophy to Shakespearean drama, libels, graffiti, court transcripts; social theory from Castiglione to Bourdieu.
  • GRS EN 720: Conflict and Representation in Jacobean Culture
    This seminar considers the representation of social/political conflicts in the Jacobean period (1603-1625),organized around topics of sovereignty, patronage, witchcraft, gender, and the marketplace. Texts include: Macbeth, The Revenger's Tragedy, The Alchemist, King James's writings, poetry of Jonson and Donne.
  • GRS EN 724: Old Age in Early Modern Literature
    An introduction to the discipline and practice of "literary gerontology" or age studies through a survey of Elizabethan and Jacobean representations of late life. Attention to relevant classical and continental resources as well as modern critical contexts.
  • GRS EN 727: Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Poetry
    Major concentration on Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson. Students may choose other poets from a list including Davenant, Marvell, Cowley, Philips, Behn, Wilmot, Killigrew, Prior, Finch, Montagu, Addison, Gray, Collins, Smart, Seward.
  • GRS EN 730: Modern Long Poem
    The long poem as sequence, notebook, atypical research, non-novel, nearly genreless book: excerpts and sometimes whole works by Crane, Williams, Stein, Pound, Loy, Auden, Prince, Zukofsky, Olson, Hill, Howe, and others, American and British.
  • GRS EN 732: The Literature of Atlantic Modernity, 1700-1900
    A theoretical and historical examination of transatlantic literature, with a focus on capitalism, aesthetics, and print culture. Readings in Marx, Weber, Raymond Williams, Benedict Anderson, Paul Gilroy, Defoe, Franklin, Wheatley, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Irving, Bronte, Melville, and James.
  • GRS EN 735: The Satanic School: Byron and the Shelleys Unbound
    The work of the "Satanic School" of writers--Byron, Percy Shelley, and Mary Shelley--during their collaborative post-Waterloo period. Readings include the major shorter works as well as Prometheus Unbound, Frankenstein, and portions of Childe Harold and Don Juan.
  • GRS EN 741: Money and Marriage in American Fiction, 1796-1925
    Marriage as literary plot, legal contract, market commodity, sexual arrangement, gendered constraint, in American fiction from the eighteenth to the twentieth century, with background readings in law, economics, history, criticism. Authors include Foster, Phelps, Howells, Hopkins, Wharton, James, Fitzgerald.
  • GRS EN 742: Knowing and Judging
    What is the status of aesthetic and interpretive claims? Are they rational, cognitive, or calculative? Are they expressions of preference, emotion, ideology, wisdom? Readings in aesthetics from Kant onwards, including Cavell, Fried, Gadamer, Sontag, Jameson, affect theory, Digital Humanities.