English

  • GRS EN 699: Teaching College English I
    The goals, contents, and methods of instruction in English. General teaching-learning issues. Required of all teaching fellows.
  • GRS EN 705: Seminar: The Writing of Plays 1
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom one act or a full-length play must be submitted in the period just before classes begin.
    A workshop in the writing of plays. Manuscripts are read using professional actors from the Boston community, and plays are discussed in class. Individual conferences. Limited enrollment.
  • GRS EN 706: Seminar: The Writing of Plays 2
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor, to whom one act or a full-length play must be submitted during the period just before classes begin.
    A workshop in the writing of plays. Manuscripts are read using professional actors from the Boston community, and plays are discussed in class. Individual conferences. Limited enrollment.
  • GRS EN 722: Medieval Performance
    Introduction to performance culture in the four centuries before Shakespeare. Reads liturgical and sacramental ritual, guild and court drama, civic and royal pageant, heresy trials, lyric poetry and song, through terms developed by contemporary language and performance theory.
  • GRS EN 724: Old Age in Early Modern Literature
    An introduction to the discipline and practice of "literary gerontology" or age studies through a survey of Elizabethan and Jacobean representations of late life. Attention to relevant classical and continental resources as well as modern critical contexts.
  • GRS EN 725: English Secular Lyric of the Seventeenth Century
    Faced with authorial challenges posed by ascendant female writers, how did male poets in seventeenth- century England defensively conceive, construct, and maintain a "masculine line" in secular lyrics? Hetero- and homosocial relations in Donne, Jonson, Drayton, Carew, Herrick, Marvell, Rochester, others.
  • GRS EN 727: Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Poetry
    Major concentration on Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson. Students may choose other poets from a list including Davenant, Marvell, Cowley, Philips, Behn, Wilmot, Killigrew, Prior, Finch, Montagu, Addison, Gray, Collins, Smart, Seward.
  • GRS EN 728: Hist/Thry Novel
    This course description is currently under construction.
  • GRS EN 729: The Shelley-Byron Circle
    The "Satanic School": The works of Percy and Mary Shelley and Lord Byron, focusing on their association in Switzerland and Italy, 1816-22. Works include Percy's Prometheus Unbound and The Cenci, Mary's Frankenstein, and Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and Don Juan.
  • GRS EN 730: Modern Long Poem
    The long poem as sequence, notebook, atypical research, non-novel, nearly genreless book: excerpts and sometimes whole works by Crane, Williams, Stein, Pound, Loy, Auden, Prince, Zukofsky, Olson, Hill, Howe, and others, American and British.
  • GRS EN 732: The Literature of Atlantic Modernity, 1700-1900
    A theoretical and historical examination of transatlantic literature, with a focus on capitalism, aesthetics, and print culture. Readings in Marx, Weber, Raymond Williams, Benedict Anderson, Paul Gilroy, Defoe, Franklin, Wheatley, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Irving, Bronte, Melville, and James.
  • GRS EN 734: Social Difference and the Rise of Corporate Capitalism in American Literature
    Against the backdrop of recent scholarship, the course examines how Cahan, Howells, James, Wharton, Dreiser, and Dunbar indexed materialism, philanthropy, literary marketplace, and cultural capital in terms of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, and political ideology.
  • GRS EN 742: Knowing and Judging
    What is the status of aesthetic and interpretive claims? Are they rational, cognitive, or calculative? Are they expressions of preference, emotion, ideology, wisdom? Readings in aesthetics from Kant onwards, including Cavell, Fried, Gadamer, Sontag, Jameson, affect theory, Digital Humanities.
  • GRS EN 744: Less Read Nineteenth Century British Novels
    Studies in less often read major novels from the British nineteenth century, including "The Heart of Midlothian," "Mary Barton," "Hard Times," "Villette," "Daniel Deronda," and "New Grub Street." Some emphasis on cultural thickness and old sectarian groups versus modern populations.
  • GRS EN 745: Information Revolutions and Transatlantic Nineteenth-Century Literature
    What happens to literature with the rise of mass print culture, quantitative science, bureaucracy, and facticity? Poe, Dickens, Melville, Thoreau, Whitman, Browning, Henry James, and Wilkie Collins. Historical methods, plus some information theory, philosophy of science, and digital humanities tools.
  • GRS EN 746: The South in Modern American Fiction
    Exploration of how US South figured in imagining national modernity. Modernism as problematic with Southern bent: Faulkner, Welty, Toomer, Erskine Caldwell, Hurston, R.P. Warren, Wright, O'Connor. Equal attention to broad, systematic examination of scholarship on major topics in modernism.
  • GRS EN 776: Stevens and Auden: Rhetoric and Poetry
    Modernism tried to forge a new unrhetorical language, but two radically different poets, Stevens and Auden, both "return to rhetoric" as a condition of thought and language to be exploited and reformed. Focus on public/private divide, poetry in war times.
  • GRS EN 778: Succession and Early Modern Tragedy
    Early modern stagings of the logic and tragedy of succession. Readings include historical texts on Tudor- Stuart succession crises, several Shakespeare plays (incl. Lear, Macbeth), less canonical plays (Spanish Tragedy, Massacre at Paris), and contemporary letters (Queen Elizabeth, Arbella Stuart).
  • GRS EN 786: Caribbean Provocations
    Significant texts from the Anglophone Caribbean from 1912 to the present, challenging to read and to theorize. Locally inspired innovations in form, language, and perspective across genres. Likely authors: Naipaul, Harris, Kincaid, Walcott, Antoni, McKay, Goodison, Morris, Roach, Brathwaite, Johnson.
  • GRS EN 788: Transnational Modernism
    This interdisciplinary course explores how globalization shaped the emergence of modernist styles in the U.S. and the Caribbean. Topics include transatlantic migration; the effects of mobilization and world war; the rise of black internationalism; and modernist indebtedness to Asian cultures.