Biology

  • CAS BI 553: Molecular Biology II (CM)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS BI 552; (CAS BI/CH 421/422 recommended.)
    Continuation of CAS BI 552 with emphasis on eukaryotes. General areas of focus include genome organization, mechanisms of gene regulation, and cell signaling. Topics including genomics, mouse transgenics systems, signal transduction, chromatin structure, and cell cycle.
  • CAS BI 560: Systems Biology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS BI 552; or consent of the instructor.
    Examines critical components of systems biology, including design principles of biological systems (e.g., feedback, synergy, cooperativity), and the generation and analysis of large-scale datasets (e.g., protein- protein interaction, mRNA expression).
  • CAS BI 563: Sensory Biology of Aquatic Animals
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS BI 260; and junior or senior standing, or consent of instructor and enrollment in the Marine Semester.
    Underwater signals, physics of signal transmission, receptors, sense organs, animal behavior. Focus on student-generated research projects: design, animal care, data collection, analysis and presentation.
  • CAS BI 569: Tropical Marine Invertebrates
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS BI 107 and CAS BI 260; and enrollment in the Marine Semester.
    Explores the diversity of marine invertebrates, including body plans, feeding biology, reproductive strategies, and developmental programs. Field biodiversity surveys and behavioral studies in shallow water tropical marine environments, especially seagrass beds and mangrove.
  • CAS BI 572: Advanced Genetics
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS BI 206 and CAS BI 203; CAS BI 552 is recommended.
    An in-depth study of eukaryotic genetics, ranging from the history and basic principles to current topics and modern experimental approaches. Genetics of Drosophila, C. elegans, mice, and humans are explored in detail, including readings from primary literature. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion.
  • CAS BI 576: Carcinogenesis
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS BI 203 ; CAS BI 206 ; CAS BI 552.
    Covers multiple aspects of cancer biology with a focus on molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development and progression, and the implications for therapy. Topics include oncogenes, tumor suppressors, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, mouse models, and chemotherapy. Emphasis on current research. Students may not receive credit for more than one of the following courses: CAS BI 327, CAS BI 576, and GMS BT 520.
  • CAS BI 578: Marine Geographic Information Science
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS BI 260 and CAS ES 144; CASMA213 strongly recommended. Enrollment in the Marine semester required.
    Introduction to marine geographic information systems and spatial analysis for conservation, management, and marine landscape ecology. Comparative examples from Gulf of Maine and tropics. Solve problems in coastal zoning and marine park design, whale and coral reef conservation. Also offered as CAS GE 578.
  • CAS BI 579: Progress in Ecology, Behavior, Evolution, and Marine Biology 1
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: graduate standing in EBE or MB.
    Facilitates presentation and discussion of research ideas, preliminary data, and research progress by all graduate students in Ecology, Behavior, Evolution, and Marine Biology (EBE-MB). All EBE-MB graduate students are encouraged to participate every semester, but receive two credits toward the degree only once, for CAS BI 579 or for CAS BI 580.
  • CAS BI 580: Progress in Ecology, Behavior, Evolution, and Marine Biology 2
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: graduate standing in EBE or MB.
    Facilitates presentation and discussion of research ideas, preliminary data, and research progress by all graduate students in Ecology, Behavior, Evolution, and Marine Biology (EBE-MB). All EBE-MB graduate students are encouraged to participate every semester, but receive two credits toward the degree only once, for CAS BI 579 or for CAS BI 580.
  • CAS BI 581: Seminar in Biology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
    Informal discussion and student reports on subjects of current interest based on an intensive study of the literature. Topics vary. Two topics are offered Fall 2016. Section C1: Exploring Neural Circuits. Current research articles are used to review the new toolsets that are being developed to dissect neural circuits Section G1: Grant Writing. Seminar course in preparing a research grant proposal.
  • CAS BI 582: Seminar in Biology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
    Informal discussion and student reports on subjects of current interest based on an intensive study of the literature. Topics vary.
  • CAS BI 583: Seminar: Progress in Cell and Molecular Biology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Open to graduate students only.
    Facilitates presentation and discussion of research ideas, preliminary data, and research progress by all graduate students in Cell & Molecular Biology (CM). All CM graduate students are encouraged to participate every semester, but receive two credits toward the degree only once, for CAS BI 583 or for CAS BI 584.
  • CAS BI 584: Seminar: Progress in Cell and Molecular Biology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Open to graduate students only.
    Facilitates presentation and discussion of research ideas, preliminary data, and research progress by all graduate students in Cell & Molecular Biology (CM). All CM graduate students are encouraged to participate every semester, but receive two credits toward the degree only once, for CAS BI 583 or for CAS BI 584.
  • CAS BI 594: Topics in Neurobiology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS BI 325 or CAS NE 203.
    Examines contemporary topics in neurobiological research, drawing from recent literature. Students critically evaluate papers, assess the soundness of methods, distinguish correct from incorrect interpretations of data, and discuss the soundness of conclusions. Topic for Spring 2015: Channelopathies: When Ion Channels Go Bad. Also offered as CAS NE 594.
  • GRS BI 607: Animal Behavior
    Ethological approach to animal behavior. Physiological, ontogenic, and phylogenic causes and adaptive significance of behavior are examined within an evolutionary framework, minimally including humans. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
  • GRS BI 610: Developmental Biology
    Contemporary aspects of development, drawing from current literature. Emphasis on the use of experimental approaches to address topics such as polarity in the egg, body axis specification, embryonic patterning and organogenesis. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion.
  • GRS BI 611: Microbiome: Our Intimate Relationship with Microorganisms
    Graduate Prerequisites: CASBI203 (or equivalent) & CASBI206 (or equivalent) or consent of instructor.
    The microbial community - referred to as "microbiome" - that colonizes the human body plays an important role in our health. Topics include (1) the human microbiome; and (2) fundamental aspects of the interactions between animals and the microorganisms that reside with them. Three hours lecture; one hour discussion.
  • GRS BI 614: Ornithology
    Examines the behavior, ecology, and morphology, physiology, classification, and evolution of birds. Flight, navigation, migration, territorial courtship, nesting, and parental behavior. Field trips. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion and demonstrations.
  • GRS BI 616: Herpetology
    Examines the diversity, life history, physiology, behavior, ecology, and evolution of amphibians and reptiles. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Field trips (including required Spring Recess trip to Florida).
  • GRS BI 621: Biochemistry 1
    Introduction to biochemistry, including protein structure and folding enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and allostery; nucleic acid structure and chemistry; recombinant DNA; lipids and membrane structure; bioenergetics; vitamins and coenzymes; introduction to intermediary metabolism. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion, four hours laboratory, graduate project.