Foundations Curriculum

  • GMS FC 701: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences I: Protein Structure, Catalysis and Interaction
    The first module of the Foundations in Biomedical Science course "Protein structure, catalysis and interactions" will provide students with a quantitative understanding of protein structure, function, posttranslational modification and the turnover of proteins in the cell. In addition, students will gain facility with thermodynamics, catalysis, kinetics and binding equilibria as they apply to proteins and also to other molecules in biological systems (e.g. nucleic acids, lipids, vitamins, etc.). This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FC 702: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences II: Structure and Function of the Genome
    The second module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the mechanisms of biological processes that influence the inheritance, regulation, and utilization of genes. Genetic and genomic, molecular, cell biological, and biochemical experimental approaches to understanding these processes will be explored. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities of utilizing these technologies in medical treatments. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FC 703: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences III: Architecture & Dynamics of the Cell
    The third module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the movement of proteins and membranes with the cell, the secretory process, the cytoskeletal framework of the cell and the resulting cell-cell interaction and communication with the matrix. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical experimental approaches to understanding these processes will be explored. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities of utilizing these technologies in medical treatments. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed to-wards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Science. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FC 704: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences IV: Mechanisms of Cell Communication
    The fourth module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the mechanisms of cell communication. This module will begin by discussing overarching concepts before examining the specific types of molecules that initiate and transduce signals. Examples of cell signaling and subsequent cellular responses will then be considered in different contexts to provide a framework on which future learning can be applied. As the module progresses, the complexity of the systems explored will increase from individual cells to multicellular environments such as tissues, organs, and organisms. In addition, normal processes as well as the dysregulation of cell-cell communication is disease will be studied. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete progressive sequence. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 705: Translational Genetics and Genomics
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course will explore the process by which insights from basic science research ultimately lead to new strategies for patient care with a focus on examples from genetics and more recent genome-wide experimental approaches. The course will cover examples of translational research using genetic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, approaches in human and/or model systems. Research that leads to new approaches for establishing disease diagnosis, prognosis, therapy, and personalized medicine will be discussed. The ethical and societal implications of these developments will also be considered. 2cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 706: Molecular Metabolism
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This optional module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences curriculum focuses on the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate cell and tissue-specific fuel metabolism. The course will present an integrated view of biochemistry and the control of cellular and organismal functions with regard to nutrient utilization. Classes include small group discussions of key papers. Mechanisms that allow cells to survive variations in nutrient supply (starvation, feeding, nutrient excess/stress) and how these mechanisms contribute to metabolic derangements contribute to disease pathogenesis (e.g. diabetes, obesity, cancer) will be discussed. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 707: Physiology of Specialized Cells
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course is one of the elective course modules (Module V) of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences curriculum. Knowledge of cellular and molecular physiology is critical to understanding the higher order of functioning of tissues, organs, and organs systems. The objective of the course is to discuss the specialized adaptations of cells that help them to function in their respective tissues and organs. This course will also provide a framework to bridge the gap between the biochemistry and the molecular and cellular biology that students have acquired in the core modules (I through IV) and organ physiology and pharmacology that will be addressed in the second year. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 708: Professional Development Skills
    This course introduces basic professional development skills for PhD students in the following areas:communication skills, research compliance/law/bioethics, and personal professional development.
  • GMS FC 762: Thinking in Biomedical Research
    The primary goal of this course is to use the framework of the scientific literature to develop Critical Thinking Skills to generate novel hypotheses with a focus on establishing novel biological mechanisms and pathways. Critical Thinking skills will be used to examine research findings and theories to uncover inconsistencies, bias, or faulty logic. The student will be expected to build on their careful evaluation and analysis of the papers to create a novel hypothesis each week and design a single experiment to address their question. The weekly course discussion will be student led and this will facilitate the development of teaching skills. Generally the papers to be discussed will be an older, classic paper, which established an important new concept and a newer paper that builds on that theme. Grading is based on weekly participation in class discussions, presentations, and a concise final written assignment. 2cr, spring
  • GMS FC 952: Research in Cell & Molecular Biology
    Var cr